Categories Earnings Call Transcripts, Finance

Bank of Hawaii Corp. (BOH) Q2 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

BOH Earnings Call - Final Transcript

Bank of Hawaii Corp  (NYSE: BOH) Q2 2020 earnings call dated July 27, 2020

Corporate Participants:

Cindy Wyrick — Director of Investor Relations

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Mary E. Sellers — Vice Chairman and Chief Risk Officer

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Analysts:

Casey Haire — Jeffries & Company — Analyst

Ebrahim H. Poonawala — Bank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Jeffrey Rulis — D. A. Davidson & Company — Analyst

Andrew Liesch — Piper Sandler — Analyst

Jacquelynne Bohlen — Keefe, Bruyette & Woods — Analyst

Laurie Havener Hunsicker — Compass Point LLC — Analyst

Presentation:

Operator

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by, and welcome to the Bank of Hawaii Corporation Second Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call. [Operator Instructions]

I would now like to hand the conference over to Cindy Wyrick, Director of Investor Relations. Please go ahead.

Cindy Wyrick — Director of Investor Relations

Thank you, Carmen. Good morning. Good afternoon, everyone. Thank you for joining us today. On the call with me this morning is our Chairman, President and CEO, Peter Ho; our Chief Financial Officer, Dean Shigemura; and our Chief Risk Officer, Mary Sellers.

Before we get started, let me remind you that today’s conference call will contain some forward-looking statements. And while we believe our assumptions are reasonable, there are a variety of reasons the actual results may differ materially from those projected. During the call, we’ll be referencing a slide presentation as well as the earnings release, a copy of the presentation and release are available on our website, boh.com under Investor Relations.

And now, I’d like to turn the call over to Peter Ho.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Great. Thanks, Cindy. Good morning, everyone. Before I start our comments, let me just give you a little commentary on Hurricane Douglas, which came through the islands this weekend. Yesterday, Douglas actually missed the Big Island without actually go into a hurricane warning, passed by both Oahu and Maui where we were in a hurricane watch, but really had somewhat nominal impact from the storm, and then thankfully cleared Hawaii late last night or actually early this morning. So from that standpoint, we obviously feel blessed and fortunate to have made it through this near-miss, and given the circumstances we’ll certainly take that.

Today marks Bank of Hawaii’s six month anniversary in our dealing with the COVID-19 pandemic as our First Executive All-Hands Meeting was held on January 27 of this year. And I have a notation in my outlook calendar that describes that meeting as a meeting to discuss the virus in China. How things have changed in six months. As you know, COVID-19 has had a dramatic effect on nearly all aspects and walks of life globally and nationally. Hawaii certainly has been impacted no differently. And while we’re one of the nation’s best performing states by infection statistic to date, the consequences of the virus have been economically dramatic.

This past Friday, our board met to hold a regularly scheduled board meeting. At that meeting, I presented a six month review of our COVID-19 response. And I thought before we get into the heart of our quarterly review, I’d share with you some of what I shared with them. I segmented my review into our core stakeholders, our community, our customers, our teammates, and of course, our shareholders.

From a community standpoint, we recognized that as a leading company in the islands for nearly 123 years, people expect us to take a leadership role and to give of ourselves freely in times of crisis and need. From a leadership standpoint, I and other members of our management team and board of directors are actively engaged in numerous philanthropic organizations, government-sponsored task forces and private sector committees engaged in supporting and leading our community at this time.

Our foundation also made early in the pandemic, a $3 million gift to the Hawaii Community Foundation to provide COVID-19 humanitarian health and economic support to the community. This is a largest corporate gift to date in the islands. And as was our hope, helped to spur further support from the corporate community. I note that funding, as I mentioned, was provided directly from our foundation. This capital base is separate and distinct from the bank.

Finally, from a community standpoint, Bank of Hawaii Foundation recently released a study called COVID-19 in Hawaii, Facts and Insights. The study was performed by Anthology Research, a respected local market research company. It was based on live and online survey data from over 1,000 respondents, making it the largest study of its kind in Hawaii. To date, we believe the study will help better inform the general community and help local policymakers make informed decisions.

From a customer standpoint, we’ve been very active in providing real solutions and resources to many parts of our customer base. We made over 4,500 PPP loans, totaling over $560 million. We’ve helped more than 17,000 people realigned their loan terms in support of the near-term dislocations caused by the pandemic. With numerous government stimulus and deferral programs a foot during the pandemic, we saw contact center volumes spike 69% in the month of April, requiring enormous commitment and support from our contact center staff.

Also, as customers have sheltered closer to home, we’ve seen unprecedented digital banking activity. Thanks to many years of focus on our digital channels, we’ve been gratified to see year-to-date mobile deposit growth of 36%, online deposit account openings growth of 300%, online mortgage app growth of 142% and online HELOC app growth of 79% year-to-date as compared to last year.

As for our teammates, we’ve been able to hold FTE levels steady. With our Cafeteria operation suspended, we’ve created a program called Meals-To-Go, preparing a weekly to-go-meal available to all employees. To date, we have distributed nearly 13,000 meals serving over 50,000 people. We encourage our employees to share their meals with family, friends and neighbors. Our employees’ health is our paramount concern and we spent over $280,000 on PPE and plan to spend ultimately approximately $2 million on flexiglass barriers and thermal scanning equipment. We’ve built a phone-based daily health screening app for our employees, and are in the process of upgrading our filtration and air replenishment infrastructure to multiples of industry standard.

Finally, for our shareholders, to date, we’ve been able to weather the storm while maintaining solid, financial and business results. Our market valuation, as measured by price-to-book, continues to lead our marketplace. We continue to gain market share in both loans and deposits on a one year basis through 3/31 of this year. We continue to fortify our balance sheet from credit losses in a measured, appropriate and balanced way.

Before I turn the call over to Mary, who will brief you on credit quality, and then Dean, who will discuss our financials, I wanted to finish off with a quick review of the local Hawaiian economy. Unemployment in Hawaii moved from 2.4% in March to 23.8% and 23.5% in April and May as the stay at home orders and travel quarantine orders went into place in the islands. June unemployment, however, improved dramatically to 13.9%, in part as a result of the partial reopening of the local economy and in part due to the PPP and other federal stimulus programs.

The green columns represent UHERO’s most recent forecast, which is foundationally what we incorporate into our own risk and financial modeling. As you can see, these numbers peak up in the following quarters. Ultimately, the direction of future unemployment will be impacted by whatever new federal stimulus comes about and the timing of such as well as the trends in infection rates here in the islands to less drive policy decisions around the rate of reopening.

On the next slide, you will see a longer term forecast for unemployment. And on the next page, you see GDP and personal income forecast, showing 2020 declines of 11% and 5%. I think I would apply the same contingencies on directionality of the accuracy of these forecast at this time. Fundamentally, Bank of Hawaii remains well positioned. We have solid credit statistics. Our base operation continues to grow in a challenged environment. Our liquidity and capital levels are robust.

Now let me turn the call over to Mary Sellers.

Mary E. Sellers — Vice Chairman and Chief Risk Officer

Thank you, Peter. At the end of the quarter, the loan portfolio, net of PPP balances, totaled $11.3 billion, and reflective of our island economies remained 60% consumer and 40% commercial, with 76% secured with high quality real estate with a combined weighted average loan-to-value of 56%. We believe this portfolio construction, built off conservative underwriting and disciplined portfolio management, will continue to provide a superior outcome and continue to allow us to support our customers and community through these difficult economic times.

Credit metrics remained strong and relatively stable in the second quarter. Net charge-offs totaled $5.1 million or 18 basis points annualized on average loans, up $1.4 million for the linked period and up $2.8 million year-over-year. Non-performing assets totaled $22.7 million at period end, up $2.1 million from the first quarter and up $900,000 from the second quarter of 2019. Criticized loans outstanding increased $1.4 million to $201.6 million or 1.71% of total loans. The credit provision was $40.4 million, which after net charge-offs of $5.1 million, resulted in a $35.2 million increase in the allowance for credit losses. The increase is reflective of our best estimate of increased losses in the portfolio given the company’s credit risk profile and the current outlook and forecast for our market with the impact of COVID-19.

As Peter noted, the estimate was anchored off UHERO’s most recent baseline forecast, but also considered the uncertainty of this path to recovery. At the end of the quarter, the ratio of the allowance for credit losses to total loans and leases was 1.47% or 1.53%, net of PPP loans. And the reserve for unfunded commitments was $2.5 million at the end of the period, down $800,000 from the first quarter and down $4.3 million from December 30, 2019.

Through the end of the second quarter, we provided payment relief to over 17,000 customer accounts on loan balances totaling $1.9 billion or 16% of total loan and leases outstanding. After peaking in April, we saw a significant decline in new requests for assistance from our customers, both consumer and commercial. 73% of the consumer loans with payment deferrals are secured with residential real estate with a weighted average loan-to-value of 61%. 49% of these customers made at least one payment in the second quarter. 89% of the commercial loans with payment deferrals are secured with a weighted average loan-to-value of 51%. 92% of these customers made at least one payment in the second quarter.

As previously discussed with COVID, a number of industries, particularly retail, lodging and restaurant and entertainment, are facing significant challenges. In total, our commercial loan exposure to these industries remain flat for the linked period at 11% of total loans, exclusive of PPP. Our retail segment totaled $600 million or 5% of total loans with 91% secured by real estate with a 54% weighted average loan-to-value. 1.7% is unsecured and deferred. And 99.9% of the unsecured exposure continues to pay interest.

The lodging segment is $500 million or 4% of total loans. 77% is real estate secured with 85% having a loan-to-value of less than or equal to 65%. 0.4% is unsecured and deferred. And 100% of our unsecured exposure continues to pay interest. Finishing with the restaurant and entertainment segment, this segment is $100 million or 1% of total loans. 39% is real estate secured with a weighted average loan-to-value of 63%. $23.5 million is unsecured and deferred with an average exposure of $400,000. 96.9% of the unsecured exposure continues to pay interest.

I’ll now turn the call back to Dean.

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Mary. As Peter stated, this was a good quarter for us despite the challenging environment. We continued our trend of loan growth in the second quarter with balances increasing by $453 million linked quarter and by over $1 billion year-on-year. The second quarter loan growth of 4% was driven by $543 million of PPP loans. Normalizing off the PPP loans and repayments on line draws resulting from the COVID pandemic, loans grew modestly by $16 million in the quarter, and we expect moderate loan growth for the rest of the year.

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In the second quarter, we experienced a record increase in deposits of nearly $1.4 billion or 8.5% linked quarter and $2 billion or 12.5% year-on-year, continuing our long history of deposit growth. While deposits resulting from PPP loan fundings and consumer economic impact payments contributed to the growth, deposit growth in the quarter came predominantly from our core consumer and commercial customers. We increased our balances by nearly $1.2 billion or 7.4%.

In addition, we have reduced our public time deposits by $53 million in the quarter to $610 million. Our deposit funding costs continued to decline during the quarter, ending at approximately 16 basis points. The low cost continues to provide us with flexibility for growth and profitability and as a mitigant against the impact of lower interest rates.

Subject to market conditions, we continued to opportunistically reduce the rates. With a comparatively low loan-to-deposit ratio of 68%, our solid and growing deposit base provides additional asset funding opportunities and pricing flexibility, while reducing our funding risk profile against risk assets. The portion of the excess liquidity was deployed into our investment portfolio and increased balances by $300 million to $6 billion.

We maintained a high credit quality and liquidity by adding AAA-rated securities with reliable monthly cash flows. AAA-rated securities represent 95% of the portfolio balances and 100% are A-rated or better. The duration of the portfolio was 3.11 years at the end of the quarter and well within our risk tolerances. The investment portfolio remains a stable and secure source of liquidity or funding for our balance sheet.

Our strong risk-based capital levels improved in the second quarter and remained substantially above the well capitalized minimums. We added to our excess capital levels improving our CET 1 and Tier 1 capital ratios by 23 basis points to 12.04%. Our capital position was further enhanced by a reduction in risk assets, which decreased to 55% of total assets. We continued to hold significant amounts of capital in excess of minimum regulatory and well capitalized levels. Our Tier 1 capital consists of $552 million more of pre-tax dollars than is required to remain well capitalized and $826 million above the regulatory minimum. These represent funds that can be deployed for growth or loss mitigation.

Now I’ll provide additional details on our financial results. Net income in the second quarter of 2020 was $38.9 million or $0.98 per share. Net interest income on a reported basis in the quarter was $126.7 million, up $700,000 from the previous quarter and up $2.6 million from the second quarter last year. Included in the second quarter net interest income was an interest recovery of $2.9 million. As Mary discussed, we recorded a credit provision of $40.4 million this quarter.

Non-interest income totaled $51.3 million in the second quarter of 2020, up $5.2 million from the previous quarter and up $5.9 million from the second quarter last year. Non-interest income in the second quarter included a gain of $14.2 million from the sale of our remaining Visa shares. Adjusted for the Visa sale, lower non-interest income was due to lower deposit fees, other service charges and customer derivative revenue. For the third quarter of 2020, we expect non-interest revenue to be approximately $37 million to $38 million. Challenges continued due to lower levels of customer activity during the ongoing disruptions from the COVID pandemic.

Non-interest expenses in the second quarter totaled $88.9 million, a decrease of $7.4 million from the previous quarter and a decrease of $3.8 million from the same quarter last year. The second quarter — in the second quarter, we accrued $1.1 million in special bonuses, which were — which ended in June for employees working on-site. In addition, we accrued $2 million in corporate incentives, which is down from $5.5 million accrued in the second quarter of 2019.

Non-interest expense in the first quarter of 2020 included seasonal payroll expenses of $3.1 million and severance expenses of $4.7 million that were partially offset by the elimination of corporate incentives. For the remainder of 2020, we expect our quarterly non-interest expenses to be flat with the second quarter at approximately $89 million. The effective tax rate for the second quarter was 20.05%. We estimate the rate will be approximately 20% to 21% for the remainder of the year.

Our return on assets was 0.82%. The return on equity was 11.58%. And our efficiency ratio was 50%. Our net interest margin in the second quarter was 2.83%, down 13 basis points from the first quarter and down 21 basis points from the second quarter of 2019. The decrease was primarily due to lower interest rates and much higher levels of liquidity due to strong deposit growth, partially offset by seven basis points from the interest recovery.

After adjusting for the interest recovery, we expect our net interest margin will decline by approximately six basis points to seven basis points in the third quarter from the continued impact of lower rates and additional liquidity. However, net interest income is expected to be approximately flat with the second quarter, net of the interest recovery as loan growth and asset mix change are expected to mitigate the impact of the lower margin.

Our estimates conservatively assume PPP loans are carried for a full 24 months. Shareholders’ equity was $1.35 billion at the end of the second quarter. During the second quarter, we paid out $26.8 million or 68% of net income in dividends, and our share repurchase program remains suspended. And finally, our board declared a dividend of $0.67 per share for the third quarter of 2020.

Now I’ll turn it back over to Peter.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Great. Thanks, Dean. So thank you for your interest in Bank of Hawaii today. And now, we’d be happy to entertain whatever questions you might have.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instructions] Our first question is from Casey Haire with Jefferies. Please go ahead.

Casey Haire — Jeffries & Company — Analyst

Yeah, thanks. Good morning, everyone. Good to hear that Hurricane Douglas did not do any damage. Good to hear.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

It was the close one, Casey.

Casey Haire — Jeffries & Company — Analyst

You guys [Indecipherable], Peter?

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

I hung that thing up a long time ago, my friend.

Casey Haire — Jeffries & Company — Analyst

Understood. Just kidding. Okay. So maybe I’ll start on credit quality. Mary, some of the slides are very helpful in terms of the forecast, obviously, could take a couple more years before we get back to normal. But sort of as you guys think about your reserve build, taking it up again this quarter, what is that we’re looking at when tourism is open up to the island and the governor just pushed it back a month? Can you just frame it around that in terms of what your forecast assume for when the islands are open again to tourism and just some sensitivities around there as we try to think about reserve build going forward?

Mary E. Sellers — Vice Chairman and Chief Risk Officer

Sure. Well, we actually got UHERO, which really had the tourism industry opening very gradually late into the third quarter with very little occupancy occurring in 2021 — 2020 and really being pushed out into 2021, and even at that point, really being at 40% to 50% of where we were in 2019.

Casey Haire — Jeffries & Company — Analyst

Okay. And so I mean, in terms of the visitors back in 2021, is there — does it assume 50% return to pre-pandemic levels? Just trying to size what you guys are baking in or UHERO is baking in?

Mary E. Sellers — Vice Chairman and Chief Risk Officer

So pre-pandemic was about 80% occupancy. So at 40% to 50%, it would be at about half.

Casey Haire — Jeffries & Company — Analyst

I understand. All right. And then on the PPP loans for two years, you guys [Technical Issue] you guys. Should we assume that that means that the [Technical Issue] the cash balances are going to — you guys are going to run with that liquidity for that same amount of time? And then just following up on the NIM. The investment securities yields, what are the reinvestment rates? And how long if we don’t get any relief from — on yields, how long will it take for the securities book to bottom?

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Okay. So I think there are like four questions in there. The PPP loans, cash deposits, those have already started running off. I mean, if you compare the amount of loans versus what we identified as the deposits, which were about $200 million, we expect that to continue to run off probably into the third, maybe trickling into the fourth quarter, but expecting it to run off in the third quarter.

In terms of the margin for the investment portfolio — on the reinvestment yield is roughly about 1%, I mean, the kind of securities that we’re buying. So roughly 1%. And then the kind of where it would bottom out, it would take a while for it to bottom out. But I would say maybe a year or two year for it to hit kind of a lower level.

Casey Haire — Jeffries & Company — Analyst

Okay, very good. Thanks for taking — sorry, go ahead.

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

No, I was just going to ask you if there were other questions that you had.

Casey Haire — Jeffries & Company — Analyst

No, no. There was a bunch in there. All right. I’ll step back. Thanks guys.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Casey.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Ebrahim Poonawala with Bank of America Securities. Please go ahead.

Ebrahim H. Poonawala — Bank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

I just wanted to follow-up on the margin, Dean. I guess, if you go back last quarter, I think at the time — again, recognizing that there were a lot of volatility, but I think your guidance was one basis point to two basis points of margin compression looking out. As you look at what happened in the margin in the second quarter, close to mid-270s with extra interest accrual for recovery. And when I look at your guidance for the third quarter, just talk to us in terms of, has anything changed in terms of what you were thinking about asset yields back in April versus today or is all of this attributable just to the excess liquidity that you will see because of deposit growth and PPP?

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

So the — what happened was, we had not expected the LIBOR rates for the short-end to come down as much as it did over the quarter. We expected that to drift lower throughout the rest of the year. So that came down about 70 basis points, 80 basis points in the quarter. So that changed the results quite a bit. In terms of the liquidity, that did impact us. About half of the drop was due to liquidity in additional deposits. So we’re looking at — so the guidance that I provided, six to seven kind of on a normalized basis, does take into account some further reductions due to rate and then some additional from the liquidity side.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Some build up.

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Some build up with liquidity, yeah.

Ebrahim H. Poonawala — Bank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Got it. So — and I guess — and that does include PPP without any — could you remind us what the PPP fees was, outstanding fees — if we assume all of this comes back, how much is the PPP fees remaining at the end of the second quarter?

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Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Well, so my forecast assumes that we don’t see any prepayments. And therefore, we do not accelerate the recognition of the fees. So that’s all built into that forecast.

Ebrahim H. Poonawala — Bank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Understood. I was just asking the total recognition fees which were outstanding, but I can follow-up later. Just as a separate question, Peter, if we can just talk about the deferral trends comparing $1.9 billion at the end of — or I guess end of second quarter versus $1.1 billion when you reported 1Q results. Just talk to us, like you provided some good color around the characteristics of these borrowers. But when we think about the customer deferral trends, your peer provided some still stats around how many of them went back to paying status over the last few months. Just give us a sense about what you think will happen in terms of the commercial borrowers going back paying? And do we need a full-fledged reopening of tourism and the economy in order to get there?

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Let me ask Mary to start and I can chime in. Mary?

Mary E. Sellers — Vice Chairman and Chief Risk Officer

Sure. In our approach to providing relief to the customers, we really took advantage of the CARES Act, which allowed us to be very flexible in what we were doing. And so we provided months of relief that aligned with what the GSEs were doing. As we’ve noted, 92% of our commercial deferral customers are making their payments, and 49% on consumer. And in our discussions with them, it appears that many did take it strictly as a precautionary measure an ability to really build some liquidity during the period. I think the majority of those are secured. And so clearly working with them should they need to continue to have some sort of relief would be very manageable.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Ebrahim, I guess, the only thing I would add there is, I think that the deferral activity is maybe not a great indicator of future economic health or credit consequence because of what Mary just described, which is a lot of frankly reasonably healthy borrowers I think out of a bit of conservatism and understandably so chose to ask and were granted some form of deferral.

Probably the more interesting space is in the criticized segment, which is where, at least from our standpoint, we’re driving that more from the standpoint of understanding what the base liquidity level is of our borrowers moving forward and with a view that this could take — this whole thing could take a year or plus to resolve. And to the extent that they have the kind of capital and liquidity to support that, that obviously was one form of rating, and if not, another form of rating.

Ebrahim H. Poonawala — Bank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Got it. And that makes sense, Peter. And then just through that if I can ask one last question. Just when we think about the resiliency of the Hawaiian economy, like if tourism fails to open over the next few months in any meaningful way, just talk to us in terms of; one, the ability of the economy, the local government to withstand that pain? And is there a break point where you think where a lot of these borrowers who have the liquidity maybe you can manage through another three months in the lockdown mode where things start sort of like falling off a cliff, like something that you would worry about in terms of duration?

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, a lot of items there. Well, I think that the easiest data point to point to is the kind of the delta in unemployment from early pandemic to kind of mid-pandemic dropped pretty substantially, and that was a result of the partial reopening. So moving from a shelter in place to a partial reopening without any visitors in the islands. Number one. And number two, kind of the effects of PPP and stimulus checks and UI plus ups and the like.

So I think our ability to withstand the crisis net of bringing visitors in, but with some form of federal stimulus, might be a little bit north of what — kind of what we experienced in the April, May to June timeframe. But you’re right. I think for the economy to get back on a full footing we’ll require a resumption of visitor inflow. And I would — I hesitate a little bit to think too much of that as a State of Hawaii issue, because irrespective of whether the state decides to amend its quarantine rule or not.

I think the real issue is what’s happening nationally and somewhat globally from an infection standpoint, and that probably has a bigger factor in driving more of the demand side of the equation. And I just think as long as we’re in this uptick mode nationally, the outlook for the visitor industry is not terribly buoyant. And to the extent that we can as a nation get that back under control, I think things kind of take over from there.

As it relates to your question on the resiliency of the State of Hawaii, the state actually has a relatively high credit rating relative to the other 49 states, and we’ll just have to see like every other municipality. But as of right now, there isn’t a sense that things will be shutting down imminently.

Ebrahim H. Poonawala — Bank of America Merrill Lynch — Analyst

Got it. I know there were a lot of things. I appreciate the color. Thank you.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Jeff Rulis with D.A. Davidson. Please go ahead.

Jeffrey Rulis — D. A. Davidson & Company — Analyst

Thanks. Good morning.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Jeff.

Jeffrey Rulis — D. A. Davidson & Company — Analyst

Just a couple of questions on the — maybe on the non-interest income. Dean, I appreciate the guidance there, but wanted to dig a little deeper. The Visa position, is that gone at this point?

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, yeah.

Jeffrey Rulis — D. A. Davidson & Company — Analyst

Okay. And then the — I guess, I assume that — I think that had associated kind of carry cost to it. Is that barring other investment securities gains, losses that’s more of a neutral event going forward?

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

No. The shares that we sold were ones we just held on our balance sheet. So what’s represented now in the income statement is the previous sales. So we do still have that swap in place.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Those are still Class B.

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, Class B. Yeah. So when the shares convert that will go away.

Jeffrey Rulis — D. A. Davidson & Company — Analyst

I see. Okay. Thank you. And then on the service charge — again, I guess baked into your guidance is a little lower run rate. But wanted to kind of see how that may be progressed or sort of built through the quarter. I don’t know if there was — April, was it pretty void of any activity and then it slowly begin to perk up? And I guess, more to Peter is the strategy there. When — I don’t know if there were fee waivers, but when is the appropriate time to kind of bring that back in? And when do you kind of get back to some level of — some of that’s activity driven by the consumer, but wanted to see if there’s anything on your end that the pace of that build going forward? Thanks.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, it’s a good question, Jeff. So Q1 to Q2, we saw about a $6.5 million reduction in those sorts of fees, okay? And so that would be OD, that would be FX, that would be ATM, merchant services, kind of very transactional debit interchange. And so as a baseline, I would probably subtract that number out moving forward. And then you’re right, I think that as the state — and those numbers kind of generally reflect pretty draconian stay at home posture from an economic activity standpoint.

So you’re right. As the quarter progressed and as the economy opened up a bit, we did see some levitation in those levels. That was driven by volume levels increasing. And we actually as of 6/30 have reinstituted our ATM fees, which is actually the only fee that we waived during that period. So some fees will float up, some not so much, like foreign exchange probably won’t move up until we started getting visitors back into the marketplace. But I think it’s reasonable to think that that $6.5 million downward delta could replenish just in the current state maybe by a third I’d call it, something like that.

Jeffrey Rulis — D. A. Davidson & Company — Analyst

Great. Okay.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Is that helpful?

Jeffrey Rulis — D. A. Davidson & Company — Analyst

Yeah, that is. It’s perfect. And then maybe just last one for Mary. The NPA additions in the quarter, any comment on were those pre-COVID stressed or just the make-up of what came in?

Mary E. Sellers — Vice Chairman and Chief Risk Officer

It was one residential loan that actually was having challenges pre-COVID. We have entered into a repayment plan, and it should go back on accrual in the first quarter of 2021.

Jeffrey Rulis — D. A. Davidson & Company — Analyst

Great. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. And our next question comes from Andrew Liesch with Piper Sandler. Please go ahead.

Andrew Liesch — Piper Sandler — Analyst

Hi, good morning, everyone.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Andrew.

Andrew Liesch — Piper Sandler — Analyst

Hi. So just a quick question, just revolving around the provisioning going forward. And just how much of the provision is driven by the UHERO unemployment rate forecast? We saw a nice drop here in June. If that continues and if it levels out here or trends low or below what their forecast — their latest forecast is, how should we look at the provisioning going forward if the unemployment rate does appear to be below what they’re forecasting?

Mary E. Sellers — Vice Chairman and Chief Risk Officer

Well, we did base it on UHERO. So it is driven off that. We did have a bias touche for the uncertainty in that recovery. So I wouldn’t expect that we’d need to continue to build the reserve at the same level moving forward, although of course in this unprecedented period, we want to continue to build reserves.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So Andrew, just to emphasize that the reduction in, the 13.9%, I guess played somewhat into our provisioning. But because UHERO actually didn’t revise their Q3 and Q4 unemployment estimate, which were kind of back into the 20% range, that’s really what’s baked into our provisioning. And I guess, I would say, as we think forward to future provisioning, my sentiment is that our unemployment, if you do want to use that as kind of a guideline, 13.9% feels like a little bit of an overreaction to the downside. And likely, we’ll probably see unemployment levels in between that 13.9% and that 24%-ish number in the earlier months. So I don’t think that the end of provisioning is in store for us any time soon, although I guess, I would say that Q2 was probably a pretty meaningful number for us.

Andrew Liesch — Piper Sandler — Analyst

Okay. Thank you. That’s really helpful. And then just on operating expenses, some of those were lower — fewer transactions, less customer activity. So how much I guess customer activity would that need to increase for expenses to get back to maybe the run rate that you were at like a year or so ago? Heard your comments in response to Jeff about maybe some of those transactions going back by about a third. But do we need to have tourism come back fully for a higher run rate or expenses — and expenses are — can we stay below $90 million for the foreseeable future?

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Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. The level of transactions did impact the expenses. It’s — I wouldn’t say it’s going to be a very material increase as the transactions do come back, but it will probably drift closer to $90 million if we get something above 50% kind of return — kind of economic activity on the fee side. So some increase, but not much.

Andrew Liesch — Piper Sandler — Analyst

Okay. Thanks, that’s very helpful.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Andrew, I think the expense side is going to be kind of that upward or downward — upward delta, I’ll call it. It’s going be driven more by our provisioning activity versus economic activity. But the economic activity, as you point out, has some impact, but it’s pretty small, like $1 million or so.

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, yeah.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

It’s really [Speech Overlap]

Andrew Liesch — Piper Sandler — Analyst

Okay. So it’s really just the provision and like certain accruals, that way maybe through salaries and benefits that have the bigger effect on expenses?

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. It’s really variable comp, but yeah, that’s right.

Andrew Liesch — Piper Sandler — Analyst

Okay. All right. Thank you. I’ll step back.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question is from Jackie Bohlen with KBW. Please go ahead.

Jacquelynne Bohlen — Keefe, Bruyette & Woods — Analyst

Hi. Good morning.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Hi, Jackie.

Jacquelynne Bohlen — Keefe, Bruyette & Woods — Analyst

Dean, I was wondering, how did premium amortization behave between this quarter and last quarter?

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

So it did go up by I believe $1.3 million to about $7.5 million. So it did increase quite a bit.

Jacquelynne Bohlen — Keefe, Bruyette & Woods — Analyst

Okay.

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

On a percentage basis. And that’s reflective of just the market with more users being where they are. There’s a lot of refi activity.

Jacquelynne Bohlen — Keefe, Bruyette & Woods — Analyst

Okay. And what are you assuming next quarter in the margin guidance you provided?

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

In terms of premium, I don’t have…

Jacquelynne Bohlen — Keefe, Bruyette & Woods — Analyst

Yeah, in terms…

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. I don’t have exactly what we factored in, but it is assuming a higher premium for the quarter.

Jacquelynne Bohlen — Keefe, Bruyette & Woods — Analyst

Okay. That’s all I needed. It’s just ballpark in kind of what you were thinking in that. Okay. Thank you. And then this one, Peter, is probably for you. I’m just wondering if you could provide an update on kind of where you are standing in terms of longer term reinvestments that you’ve been doing? And if any of that has been paused? If any of it is going ahead? And also how customer behavior, and you gave great statistics on digital adoption, how that might be impacting any future efficiency projects you have in the works?

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So I guess I would say, Jackie, that the situation with COVID has in some ways accelerated a lot of the direction that we were heading in any way. So as you know, we’ve made a lot of investment to date in our digital platforms and continue to do so. And I think we’ll continue to do so simply because they generate return for us. So they either generate more revenue or they help us bring down, make things more efficient.

So I want to — at this point, fortunately, we’ve got most of the fat end of the investment curve in already from an investment standpoint. We do have some kind of tangential investments to make. We have some larger decisions to make, call it, a year plus out, hopefully outside of this horizon. But ultimately, the idea is that we generate more revenue there, so that’s a positive. And that probably doesn’t get in the way of our investment making decision even in this environment.

As it relates to footprint, which I think is what you’re probably driving towards. Pre-pandemic, we were 68 branches. We skinny that down to 31 into the teeth of the pandemic. And now we’ve widened out back to about 40. And we’re going to see what happens moving forward from a customer transaction standpoint in the branches, because we’ve seen that activity fall pretty precipitously. Our guess is that once things go back to normal, that will result in some upward shift in visitor traffic back to the branches. But I think that there is probably a fair number of folks who now that they’ve been exposed to our digital capabilities probably remain digital customers. So I don’t think that the numbers bounce back to pre-pandemic levels, and that obviously creates some efficiency opportunities for us down the path.

Jacquelynne Bohlen — Keefe, Bruyette & Woods — Analyst

Okay. So I would guess that the evaluation of that assuming we have resolution on the virus could be put in with some of the larger decisions you were talking about in about a year or so?

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, yeah. I mean I think those are always ongoing conversations. But yeah, I think we won’t really know what the true transaction volumes will look like in our branches until we get to some more normal state of activity.

Jacquelynne Bohlen — Keefe, Bruyette & Woods — Analyst

Okay, makes sense. Great. Thank you for all the detail. I appreciate it.

Operator

Thank you so much. [Operator Instructions] Our next question is from Laurie Hunsicker with Compass Point. Please go ahead.

Laurie Havener Hunsicker — Compass Point LLC — Analyst

Yeah. Hi, good morning.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Laurie.

Laurie Havener Hunsicker — Compass Point LLC — Analyst

Dean, I wondered if we could just go back to the margin guidance that you were giving of down six basis points to seven basis points next quarter, were you doing that off of the headline as 2.83 [Phonetic] or were you backing out the interest recovery book, so coming off of the 2.77 or 2.76 margin?

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

Yes. It was off of the adjusted. So if you kind of did the calculation, puts us at about 2.7% margin.

Laurie Havener Hunsicker — Compass Point LLC — Analyst

Perfect. Okay, perfect. Okay. Then the other question that I had was, and I appreciate that you’re not including any of the PPP fees, forgiveness fees in your margin. But of your $562 million, what are the total fees that you expect over the life of those loans?

Dean Y. Shigemura — Vice Chairman and Chief Financial Officer

In total it’s about $18 million.

Laurie Havener Hunsicker — Compass Point LLC — Analyst

$18 million. Okay, that’s great. And then, Mary, just a question for you. Office exposure, where do you guys stand? And do you have an LTV on that?

Mary E. Sellers — Vice Chairman and Chief Risk Officer

I do. It’s 12% of our total commercial mortgage book, and the weighted average LTV is 59%.

Laurie Havener Hunsicker — Compass Point LLC — Analyst

Okay, great. And then same question on leverage loans. Do you have a dollar amount? And then also, maybe help us think about how much of that is gov-con, government contracts?

Mary E. Sellers — Vice Chairman and Chief Risk Officer

We have $54 million in leverage exposure. It’s 3% of our total C&I. 26% is essential — I mean, sorry, 74% is kind of essential businesses. I don’t think any is really related to government contracts.

Laurie Havener Hunsicker — Compass Point LLC — Analyst

Okay, that’s helpful. And then I guess just kind of going back — maybe, Peter, this is more a question for you. Can you help us think about what your target is for your reserves to loans?

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, we don’t actually target. We don’t — so that would be kind of different from how we set the reserve. So the reserve actually — it’s really a function of what the reserve requirement that creates to your provision. And that’s really not targeted as much as it is a calculation around what we’re seeing environmentally. So obviously, it’s a function of what is our — what are the markets that we lend money into, looking like what are the reasonable, supportable prospects moving forward within a one year timeframe against what’s the intrinsic quality of our loan portfolio. And so actually we’re fortunate in that. We have a lower risk asset profile as a percentage of total earning assets that most banks — which gives us a little bit of intrinsic advantage in terms of being able to afford the provision and other things and earnings support, if you will.

Laurie Havener Hunsicker — Compass Point LLC — Analyst

Okay. I mean, again, just looking at your reserves ex the PPP, you’re at 153, 154, something like that. I mean, you had a huge gain, Visa gain this quarter. If we look at your loan loss provision of $40.4 million, if you hadn’t had that Visa gain, would you have thought about that number differently? I mean I realize there is some softness in terms of there is massive unknowns, right? And so I’m just trying to understand directionally, as you said, look, maybe it comes down obviously, I appreciate there is a lot of unknowns, I’m just trying to think about how much maybe the Visa gain played in or how — just even directionally, how you’re thinking about where you’re comfortable with that number?

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So…

Laurie Havener Hunsicker — Compass Point LLC — Analyst

Maybe I’m asking this question twice. But yes, thanks.

Peter S. Ho — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.So kind of the first — the answer to the first question is no. Our provisioning and our reserving really don’t have anything to do with our decision to either take or not take the Visa gain. That was at — that’s investment that we’ve had for many, many years, and actually a bit of the process of selling portions of that investment for years now. But from a provisioning standpoint, I guess, what I would say is that these are uncertain times. And so there is a certain level of inaccuracies that’s just built into everyone’s provisioning that for those companies that have the ability, the earning capacity to provision in a healthy way, I think that’s probably a smart thing to do. So you saw that in the quarter. It was a large number, and it was not necessarily a number — it wasn’t a number driven by any potential earning outcome, whatsoever really. It’s kind of a separate analysis.

Laurie Havener Hunsicker — Compass Point LLC — Analyst

Okay, great. Thanks. I’ll leave it there.

Operator

Thank you. And I’m not showing any further questions in the queue. I would like to turn the call back to Cindy Wyrick for any final remarks.

Cindy Wyrick — Director of Investor Relations

I’d like to thank everyone for joining us today and for your continued interest in Bank of Hawaii. As always, please feel free to contact me if you have additional questions or need further clarifications on any of the topics discussed today. Thanks everyone.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

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