Categories Earnings Call Transcripts, Technology

Fabrinet (FN) Q4 2022 Earnings Call Transcript

FN Earnings Call - Final Transcript

Fabrinet (NYSE: FN) Q4 2022 earnings call dated Aug. 15, 2022

Corporate Participants:

Garo Toomajanian — Vice President of Investor Relations

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Csaba Sverha — Chief Financial Officer

Analysts:

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

Tim Savageaux — Northland Capital Markets — Analyst

Ethan Widell — B. Riley — Analyst

Presentation:

Operator

Good afternoon. Welcome to Fabrinet’s Financial Results Conference Call for the Fourth Quarter of Fiscal Year 2022. [Operator Instructions]

I would now like to turn the call over to your host Garo Toomajanian, VP of Investor Relations.

Garo Toomajanian — Vice President of Investor Relations

Thank you, operator, and good afternoon, everyone. Thank you for joining us on today’s conference call to discuss Fabrinet’s financial and operating results for the fourth quarter and fiscal year 2022, which ended June 24, 2022. With me on the call today are Seamus Grady, Chief Executive Officer; and Csaba Sverha, Chief Financial Officer. This call is being webcast and a replay will be available on the Investors section of our website located at investor.fabrinet.com.

During this call, we will present both GAAP and non-GAAP financial measures. Please refer to the Investors section of our website for important information, including our earnings press release and investor presentation which include our GAAP to non-GAAP reconciliation. In addition, today’s discussion will contain forward-looking statements about the future financial performance of the company.

Forward-looking statements are subject to risks and uncertainties that could cause actual results to differ materially from management’s current expectations. These statements reflect our opinions only as of the date of this presentation and we undertake no obligation to revise them in light of new information or future events except as required by law. For a description of the risk factors that may affect our results, please refer to our recent SEC filings, in particular the section captioned Risk Factors in our Form 10-Q filed on May 3, 2022. We will begin the call with remarks from Seamus and Csaba, followed by time for questions.

I would now like to turn the call over to Fabrinet’s CEO, Seamus Grady. Seamus?

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Garo. Good afternoon, everyone, and thank you for joining us on our call today. We delivered a strong fourth quarter performance with revenue that was at the upper end of our guidance range and non-GAAP earnings per share that was above our guidance. We produced these results in spite of ongoing supply chain headwinds. Strong demand across our key end markets helped drive revenue of $587.9 million, an increase of 15% from a year ago and 4% from Q3.

Record non-GAAP earnings per share of $1.68 was the result of strong execution and exceptionally strong margins with non-GAAP operating margin reaching new quarterly high of 10.7%. Our results for the year as a whole represented several records for Fabrinet. Fiscal 2022 revenue of $2.26 billion increased 20% from the prior year and with non-GAAP operating margin of 10.3% for the year. We generated $6.13 in non-GAAP earnings per share, an increase of 31% from a year ago reflecting strong execution throughout the year.

Looking at the quarter more closely, we delivered record optical communications revenue with both telecom and datacom revenue up sequentially and year-over-year. Automotive, which remains our largest non-optical communications category also had a record quarter, while industry laser was down sequentially, but remains within the range of the last several quarters. Overall demand for our services continues to be very strong as demand and revenue have increased over the course of the year so as the corresponding impact of supply constraints that we’ve discussed for the last several quarters. Parts and components that are in tighter supply are still largely commodity parts that impact all of our end markets.

While we have started to see some improvements in supply availability for certain parts, the most significant constraint to our growth continues to be the supply environment, which we are managing as effectively as possible. To ensure the capacity does not become a limiting factor for our growth, we have been constructing our largest manufacturing building today. We are pleased to announce that we recently opened our 1 million square foot Building 9 at our Chonburi campus. This one building expands our global footprint by approximately 50% and provides us with ample capacity to continue growing our business over the next several years.

As we mentioned last quarter, we are in discussions with a number of customers looking to expand in our new building and we’re making good progress on that front. In fact, we have already begun installing equipment for our first customer at Building 9, and expect that if all goes well we could start to see revenue from this facility by the end of the September quarter. In addition, we are in the process of installing equipment for two additional customers who are slated to start production by the end of the calendar year.

Looking ahead to the first quarter and fiscal 2023, we are very optimistic about our long-term prospects for continued growth and strong profitability. In the last two years, we demonstrated our ability to improve margins while simultaneously delivering double-digit revenue growth which illustrates that our long-term strategy is working. As we look ahead, we are optimistic that we’ll be able to continue to deliver on our goals of driving top-line growth and expanding operating margins. As a result, we are confident that we can now target non-GAAP operating margins of above 10% compared to our prior targets in the upper 9% range.

In summary, our strong fourth quarter was a high loss on which to end an accident year. Despite the supply challenges the industry is experiencing, we delivered strong top-line growth with record hearings demonstrating the inherent leverage in our business model. We are optimistic that we can extend this track record of profitable growth as our business continues to scale in fiscal 2023 and in the years ahead.

Now I’d like to turn the call over to Csaba for additional financial details on our fourth quarter and our guidance for the first quarter of fiscal 2023. Csaba?

Csaba Sverha — Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Seamus, and good afternoon, everyone. With strong demand trends, we continue to be in a supply-constrained environment, still, we managed to achieve revenue that was at the upper end of our guidance range at $587.9 million, representing 15% growth from a year ago and 4% growth from the third quarter. With improving margins, our bottom line grew faster than the top line with non-GAAP earnings per share of $1.68, which was $0.09 above the top end of our guidance range and 28% increase from a year ago and 12% increase from Q3.

I would like to point out that we were able to achieve these results without including expedite fees in our revenue. Rather we pass on these expenses directly to customers, so there is no impact on our income statement. This is important because it means we do not expect to be negatively impacted by the removal of these fees as supply constraints begin to ease. By end market, optical communications revenue was $464.7 million, up 20% from a year ago and 6% from Q3. Within optical, telecom revenue was a record $371.9 million, up 20% from a year ago and 4% sequentially. Datacom revenue of $92.8 million increased 20% from a year ago and 14% sequentially. By technology, silicon photonics revenue was $151.1 [Phonetic] million, an increase of 37% from a year ago and 4% sequentially.

Revenue from products rated at speeds of 400 gig or more was $178.9 million, up 34% from a year ago but down 5% from Q3 as the supply constraint impact increased on some of these products in the quarter. Meanwhile, revenue from 100 gig product increased 14% sequentially largely due to revenue that was pushed from Q3 to Q4 as the qualified alternative parts for a certain program as we discussed last quarter.

Non-optical communications revenue was $123.2 million and represented 21% of total revenue. Within non-optical communications automotive revenue reached a record $56 [Phonetic] million, up 5% from last quarter, assisted by improvement in supply availability. Industrial laser revenue was $37.2 million, down 5% sequentially but remaining stabled trends over the last few years. Other non-optical communications revenue was $30 million.

As I discuss the details of our P&L, expense and profitability metrics provided are on a non-GAAP basis unless otherwise noted. A reconciliation of GAAP to non-GAAP measures is included in our earnings press release and investor presentation which you can find in the Investor Relations section of our website. Strong execution produced very healthy margins in the quarter. Gross margin reached 13% with a foreign exchange tailwind contributing about 20 basis points. We expect gross margin to moderate in the first quarter due primarily to an annual merit increases.

Operating expenses in the quarter were $13.5 million or 2.3% of revenue in line with expectations. This produced record operating income of $62.8 million or 10.7% of revenue. While we expect operating margin to dump in a small amount in the first quarter, we are optimistic that many of the operating efficiencies we have enjoyed in fiscal 2022 will under as we look ahead. We are excited to be able to deliver on our commitment to increase margins over time. And as such we are now targeting trending operating margins to be above 10%, though we could see quarterly bps below that level from time to time.

Effective tax rate was 3.3% for the fourth quarter. Non-GAAP net income was $62.6 million or $1.68 per diluted share, which is a quarterly record and above our guidance range. On a GAAP basis, net income was $1.51 per diluted share. For the full fiscal year 2022, revenue was a record $2.26 billion, an increase of 20% on fiscal 2021, with operating margins of 10.3% for the year. Non-GAAP net income was also a record at $6.13 per share, or an increase of 31% from a year ago.

Turning to the balance sheet and cash flow statements. At the end of the fourth quarter, cash, restricted cash and investments were $478.5 million, down $36.6 million from the end of the third quarter. Operating cash flow was $16.3 million with capex of $14.3 million, free cash flow was $2.1 million in the quarter. For the year, free cash flow was $34.7 million. With construction of Building 9 now complete, we expect free cash flow to increase significantly in fiscal 2023.

During the quarter our buyback activity increased to both our 10b5-1 plan and open market purchases. We repurchased approximately 353,000 shares at an average price of $88.67 per share for a total cash outlay of $31.3 million. For the year, we repurchased approximately 630,000 shares for a total cash outlay of nearly $60 million reflecting our commitment to return value to shareholders. As a result, $21.3 million remained in our share repurchase authorization at the end of the quarter. Since then [Phonetic], our board has authorized an additional $78.7 million for repurchases, increasing the total authorization to $100 million.

Now I will turn to our guidance for the first quarter of fiscal year 2023. Demand for our services remains very strong across our business. Those supply chain constraints persist and have gotten worse in some areas, we are encouraged to see some pockets of improvement and we anticipate the supply chain headwinds will be slightly lower than in Q4 at approximately $25 million to $30 million. Keep in mind that Q1 is a 14-week quarter which is warmly longer than a typical quarter and this should be considered when making comparisons to other periods. We estimate the impact of this extra week to be $20 million of additional revenue in Q1, which we will not see in Q2.

With these factors in mind, we anticipate revenue of $620 million to $640 million in Q1. Due to our annual merit increases, which I mentioned, we expect gross margin and operating margin to moderate from the fourth quarter. As such, we anticipate non-GAAP net income to be in the range of $1.72 to $1.79 per diluted share. In summary, we are very pleased with our strong execution in the fourth quarter and all of fiscal 2022. We are optimistic that positive demand trends can continue and then coupled with the potential easing of supply constraints, gives us confidence that we can continue to deliver strong top line growth and increasing margins over the long term.

Operator, we are now ready to open the call for questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instructions] Our first question comes from the line of Alex Henderson of Needham & Company. Alex Henderson, your line is open.

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

Great. Thank you very much. First off, congratulations. A great quarter. Obviously executing superbly which is what we would expect from you. Clearly, the exchange rates are helping your numbers considerably as a result of the fact that you sell in dollars and part of your costs are in local currencies. Can you talk a little bit about the structure of your hedges as we go into FY ’23? I assume that you are fully hedged to year-end and then lesser and lesser over time, but how does that — how does the current exchange rates impact your structure? And relative to the offset against obviously the economy in Thailand is doing quite well, there is obviously inflation to deal with. So I assume you’re seeing wage inflation as an offset. Can you talk a bit about those two in context of each other? Thanks.

Csaba Sverha — Chief Financial Officer

All right. Hi, Alex, this is Csaba. Thanks. So let me address first, the exchange rate question. So we haven’t really changed our hedging profile recently. So we maintain our hedging program, which is a layered hedge, we are hedged out 100% for the next quarter, 50% for the quarter after, and 25% in the third quarter. So obviously, in the last two quarters, it has already resulted 20 basis point gross margin tailwinds in our numbers. So obviously in the last quarter the Thai baht [Phonetic] has continued to depreciate. So we continue to expect that this is going to represent a tailwind as we wind down our hedges and continue buying the currencies as we execute the program. So that’s one part. So it’s been 20 basis point in last quarter and 20 basis points in Q3, so we expect this to continue in the future.

Now, when it comes to inflation and headwinds, we typically have our annual merit increases in our fiscal first quarter. So given the higher inflation rates, that’s also reflected in our annual merit increases. So that’s certainly going to represent a bit of headwind in Q1, which we anticipate that we can make it up in the next couple of quarters by efficiency improvements. So again while we have continuous tailwind from exchange rate in the first quarter, we do anticipate a little bit of deterioration on gross margins from the inflation and from the merit increases. But overall, in Q4, our bottom line has benefited about $0.06 from exchange rate. So we — it’s been a nice pick up over the last six months.

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

So if I look out into the FY ’23 period, since year-end ’22 on this print, you’ve posted a very nice 20% growth rate 15% in the most recent quarter. You’ve got a significant backlog on the supply chain. Your customers have significant backlogs and their customers have significant backlogs. As you think through the mechanics of all of that, I mean, looking at CNS [Phonetic] got over 100% of a full year product sales, and backlog and has never had seen cancellation. How do you mechanically think through the growth rate should we be thinking 15% to 20% for ’23 as an attainable level, or are you — do you have other macro concerns that you’re winning against that?

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

I think I’ll — this is Seamus. We’re just going to guide one quarter at a time. We’re not going to get too far ahead of ourselves. We do continue to see very strong demand for, let’s say, the encouraging part. We’re limited by component supply I think like everybody right now, but demand continues to be very strong and we’re not seeing really any letup in demand. We’re seeing a slight improvement in supply. So that’s a little bit encouraging, much too early to our victory, but it is encouraging to see supply beginning to alleviate somewhat. But we’re not going to guide really beyond Q1 at this point, but we do remain like I said, we do remain quite optimistic about the overall demand environment that we see.

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

You can’t blame a guy for trying. One more question and then I’ll cede the floor. So relative to the supply chain issues, obviously, parts availability is a big piece of it. But the other piece of it is the expedite fees that you’re passing through and not recognizing in your costs. Are those [Technical Issues] and what about the spot market and pricing parts in general? Any news flow on those particular issues?

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. The expedite fees, you’re correct. We passed those through to our customers. We don’t mark to offer anything like that and we don’t count it as revenue. So the nice thing about that is as the expedite fees go away, hopefully, over the coming quarters, there’s zero impact to us in terms of our revenue. On the expedite fees and the brokers and whatnot, no particular change. Maybe prices coming down a little bit in the broker market. That’s a bit anecdotal but we are seeing some reduction in the big premiums we were seeing a year ago. It has begun to ease a little bit in the broker market. But it’s a bit anecdotal at this stage, a bit early to draw any big conclusions, but maybe improving a little bit.

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

Great. I’ll cede the floor. Thanks.

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Alex.

Csaba Sverha — Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Alex.

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instructions] Our next question comes from the line of Tim Savageaux of Northland Capital Markets. Tim Savageaux, your line is open.

Tim Savageaux — Northland Capital Markets — Analyst

Okay, thanks. I’m sorry. Good afternoon, and congrats on the great results.

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Tim Savageaux — Northland Capital Markets — Analyst

So looking at your kind of segment commentary, it does seem like you saw some strength or pick up on the ROADM side in the quarter or at least on your kind of non-speed rated products. I want to confirm if that’s the case and whether that is indicative of improving supply, given that’s been a real pain point there. And then whether you’d expect that to continue. If you look at your apples-to-apples guide $587 million to $610 million [Phonetic], I guess, would be comparable. Mid-range, do you expect telecom to continue to drive that or any other particular segments moving around there in the guide? Thanks.

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

I think on the ROADM strength, Tim, it’s hard for us to comment on that without maybe inadvertently giving guidance for one or two of our customers. So we’ll maybe leave our results to speak for themselves. We have more than ROADMs in non-speed rated. There are several other components and products in there. But yeah, we — so we won’t really comment on ROADM specifically. But yeah, you’re right, our non-speed rated business is quite strong.

The midpoint of our guidance when you adjust for the additional $20 million we’re getting for the 14th week, you’re exactly right. The midpoint of the guidance would be $610 million when you back out the $20 million that we’re picking up with the 14th week. So I think that’s — we believe, nice growth quarter-on-quarter, nice growth year-on-year. We’re just really limited by component supply but doing our very best, and I think our team has done a fantastic job to get our share of the components and maybe in some cases our own fair share of the components. So I would like to thank our team for the great job they’ve been doing there to help us get through the supply situation. But yeah, so $610 million at the midpoint of the guidance and the overall very, very strong demand and just purely limited by supply chain.

Tim Savageaux — Northland Capital Markets — Analyst

Okay. Maybe I’ll try one more time. Yeah, but if you look at that $610 million, I guess, in terms of the sequential growth or you can take it year-over-year or however you want. Did you look for broad-based strengths across the various element of your business? Or you saw, well, see a nice pickup in Datacom last quarter as well. So anything like that to call out in terms of particular drivers across the segment?

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. I think telecom is quite strong. Datacom was strong, but some of that growth in datacom came from, you may recall, we had $15 million because of a qualification issue the prior quarter that got pushed into Q4. But still, even with that, datacom remains quite strong. We feel — I think we feel good about all the markets we serve. Laser continues to be a little bit soft, but datacom is — we see it being strong. Telecom is strong. Automotive is very strong for us and particularly LiDAR. We have some really good growth in LiDAR. We’re also starting to see some good growth in 400ZR and some very good growth in 400ZR. A little bit early to start calling it out separately as its own category, but it’s probably getting there over the next few quarters. So good solid growth drivers across all the segments we serve maybe with the exception of laser which is a little bit flat for us.

Tim Savageaux — Northland Capital Markets — Analyst

Great. Thanks.

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Tim.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question is a follow-up from Alex Henderson of Needham & Company. Alex Henderson, your line is open.

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

Super. Thanks. So I was hoping we could talk a little bit about the systems business, whether you’ve seen any progress in terms of bringing additional customers on and how you see the systems portion of your business participating in the quarter that you reported and then the outlook going forward?

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So we’re — we continue to pursue, as you rightly pointed out, Alex, we continue to pursue new systems business at both existing customers and new customers and really in situations where we’re already making a lot of the content. It is to build — box build on its own isn’t really a good fit for us. We’re already producing a lot of the content, it can be a really good fit for us. The timing of new wins, it’s very hard to predict as they’re usually driven by maybe external catalysts to do with program changes and other suppliers and whatnot. So there’s usually a number of external catalysts that we don’t particularly control. So it’s hard to predict the timing of those.

But like I say, while we’re optimistic there will be more system business for us to announce in the future. We can’t really predict when that might be. Again, the current supply environment is not helping things because, of course, with any big system transfer, the first thing you have to do is build a buffer of inventory. And it’s — as you’d appreciate, it’s hard to build a buffer when most companies are struggling to get enough parts to build just the minimum that’s required to satisfy the immediate demand.

So — but it’s still very much in our focus and I think we’ve shown with the significant wins we’ve had over the last few years. We’re able to bring on that business in a way that actually helps our margin because we can do it without adding any — really any incremental operating expenses. Our operating expenses have remained quite flat over the last several years as we’ve grown the revenue nicely. But nothing specific to announce at this point, Alex, but still very much in focus for us.

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

Yeah. It sounds if I could just dig into that a little bit. So can you talk about whether it’s growing faster or slower than the corporate average? And can you talk about whether the net impact on margins is positive, negative, neutral relative to that business?

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

It’s very hard to say. Really, it varied by program. Some programs are a little bit higher than the average. Some programs are lower. Overall, in terms of growth, it’s probably a net contributor to growth because we’ve been bringing on those big programs and then growing those programs both with the same — with the programs we originally transferred, let’s say, but also new wins since we’ve transferred those programs. So we’ve grown both the volume with the programs we transferred. We’ve also won additional programs with those customers. So overall, I think it’s been a net contributor to growth. Margin, it’s probably at or above the corporate average, but like I say, we’re able to do it without any incremental opex. So it does help the overall situation.

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

Understand. And so you have now grandfathered the original handoffs, that’s fully apples-to-apples plus incremental program growth. So I assume that that’s an ongoing kind of trajectory. Is it your sense that the existing customers have a fair amount additional business that they could hand off to you? Or do you think that they’re relatively stated in terms of the transferals?

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

I think it depends on really which company we’re talking about or which companies we’re talking about. Obviously, some companies are bigger than others and would have a lot of business that they outsource still with our competitors. So we like to make sure we maximize our market share. We don’t need to produce everything for our customers, but we do like to be an important and significant supplier for our customers. So I think there’s certainly plenty of headroom left to grow with the system business that we’ve already won. We’ve already got some very nice growth, but I think there’s still a lot of runway left to continue to grow that business.

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

One more question around technology. Co-packaged Optics has been kind of just off the edge of the headlights for a while. Has there been any change in that sector? Or is it something that’s starting to percolate through your opportunity set? Or is it still pretty far out and pass the headlights?

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

I think it’s a little bit of both. So we are working on co-packaged optics, let’s say, products that have co-packaged optics with our customers to develop the processes that would be required to produce those co-packaged optics products in the future when they become more mainstream. So we’re working on that. There’s another school of thought that says, of course, co-packaged optics, the pluggable optics will continue for a very long time. And we’re working with, let’s say, a separate number of customers who are very focused on making sure the pluggables continue for a long time. We’re quite, if you like, agnostic to the technology, whichever one wins, we don’t mind. We’re happy to work with all our customers.

In terms of co-packaged optics becoming mainstream, yeah, I think you’re right, it’s a bit beyond the headlights right now. It’s probably — if I had to put a date on it, it’d be hard to see it happening anytime soon, probably three years out, two-and-a-half, three years out, something like that. So we’re working — like I said, we’re working with customers on co-packaged optics. We’re also working with other customers on all kinds of exactly pluggable solutions that would mean the pluggables will continue for a very long time.

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

Just last question and I’ll cede the floor again. So in the 400 gig plus arena, obviously, very nice growth. But I assume that you’re also seeing additional new products coming into the pipeline that had yet to ramp. Can you talk a little bit about what that pipeline looks like relative to the 400-gig plus segment. Is there a continuation of additional products that are going to drive that growth at strong rates for an extended period of time?

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. There’s a couple of categories, I would say. There’s 400ZR in the telecom space that’s really just starting to get going. And like I said, we’re seeing some nice revenue from it. It’s growing very nicely. We have three customers in particular that have — well, four customers I should say. Three are shipping. One is maybe struggling a little bit with the design and the power envelope, but three of our customers are shipping volume now varying degrees of volume. But three of our customers are shipping 400ZR product right now. And then, of course, we have 800 gig and what we see is the adoption of 800 gig inside the data center about to take place as well. So there’s a nice — I would say, a nice pipeline of again, for us, it falls into the category of 400 gig and above. We don’t like to give too much detail beyond that because, again, we’re always — Alex, we’re always concerned that we don’t want to inadvertently announced the products on behalf of one of our customers. But suffice to say, we have a nice pipeline of both 400ZR and 800 gig products that we’re working on.

Alex Henderson — Needham & Company — Analyst

Perfect. Thank you very much.

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Thank you very much, Alex.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Ethan Widell of B. Riley. Ethan Widell, your line is open.

Ethan Widell — B. Riley — Analyst

Hi. Thank you for taking my question. I was wondering if your component shortages are concentrated in any of your reporting segments or verticals or if they’re more broadly distributed? Thanks.

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

They’re very broadly distributed actually. And it’s not — typically, it’s not any particularly exotic component that’s in question it’s usually [Phonetic], let’s say, standard commodity type electronic components. But no, it’s not unique to one. All of our industry segments that we support are equally, I would say, equally affected by the component shortages.

Ethan Widell — B. Riley — Analyst

Okay, thanks. That’s helpful. And then one follow-up. You mentioned having a buffer of inventory. And I was wondering if you could provide any color as to kind of how you expect to see that change as conditions normalize.

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. We have — our inventory has grown over the last while, as we’ve tried to position inventory to support our customers’ demand and sometimes you have if you need 100 components, you have 99 of them and if you don’t have that last one, you can’t ship. So we end up carrying maybe a little bit more inventory on the balance sheet than we’d like to in an ideal world. But the good news is it’s good inventory and it’s inventory that’s tied to specific customer demand and customer orders. So there’s no particular risk. If anything, it presents an opportunity for us as we clear, let’s say, the components that were short that caused the inventory to increase in the first place. As we clear those component issues and begin to get match that, we should begin to see that — those inventory levels alleviate as we convert inventory to cash and ship products for our customers. So it does give us, hopefully, a little bit of an advantage in the coming quarters as we start to see those component shortages [Technical Issues] to satisfy the customers needs.

Ethan Widell — B. Riley — Analyst

Certainly. Thank you.

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

You’re welcome.

Operator

Thank you. We have a follow-up question from Tim Savageaux of Northland Capital Markets. Tim Savageaux, your line is open.

Tim Savageaux — Northland Capital Markets — Analyst

Thanks. I wanted to follow up on the 400 gig front. And you called out ZR is getting increasingly driving growth there. I wonder if you can maybe quantify that a little bit? I know you’re probably off a small base, but any sense for where that contribution is right now? Or where you expect it to be? And despite that, what I assume would be a very strong sequential increase in ZR, you did see an overall decline in 400 gig revenues? And wonder if you could talk about the drivers there.

Csaba Sverha — Chief Financial Officer

Hi, Tim. This is Csaba. Let me take that. So overall 400ZR has been ramping over the last four quarters. So on an annual basis, again, it represents high single-digit portion of our revenue. So we said we would start calling out when it reaches 10%, it’s not quite there, but the growth in this segment has been quite significant over the last couple of quarters. So sequentially, it grew in Q4 to Q3, but overall, on a yearly basis it’s now representing about high single-digit of our revenues.

Now in terms of the other part of the 400 gig portfolio, I mentioned in my prepared remarks, that we did have a little bit of surprise in that segment from material constraints. So that took us — set us [Phonetic] back a little bit. Otherwise, if we had those components, we could have been higher and sequentially up in that segment, too. So the temporary decline is supply related, but overall, the strength is there from ZR and it’s high single digits.

Tim Savageaux — Northland Capital Markets — Analyst

Great. Really appreciate that color. And don’t see a filing out yet, but I wonder if you can comment for us on 10% customers, maybe in number and what they were in the aggregate or to the extent you can disclose something part of the filing.

Csaba Sverha — Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, sure. 10-K is coming out tomorrow, so we will have that disclosed in our 10-K. We had three customers over 10%. Descending order, Cisco was a 25%, slightly higher than 25% customer. Infinera was above 12%, and Lumentum was above 10%. So these three customers have represented, overall, I think, above 48% of total revenue.

Tim Savageaux — Northland Capital Markets — Analyst

Awesome. Thanks again.

Csaba Sverha — Chief Financial Officer

Welcome.

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Tim, you’re welcome.

Operator

Thank you. At this time, I’d like to turn the call back over to Seamus Grady for closing remarks. Sir?

Seamus Grady — Chief Executive Officer

Thank you for joining our call today. We are excited to deliver a strong performance in Q4 and all of fiscal 2022 despite supply chain issues impacting many industries. We are optimistic that with continued strong demand and significant new capacity, we will be able to deliver more strong performances in the quarters and years ahead. We look forward to speaking with you again and seeing those of you who will be attending the Jefferies conference at the end of the month. Thank you, and goodbye.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

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