Categories Earnings Call Transcripts, Industrials

IDEX Corp. (NYSE: IEX) Q1 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

IEX Earnings Call - Final Transcript

IDEX Corp. (IEX) Q1 2020 earnings call dated Apr. 24, 2020

Corporate Participants:

Mike Yates — Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Analysts:

Deane Dray — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Mike Halloran — Robert W. Baird — Analyst

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

Nathan Jones — Stifel — Analyst

Allison Poliniak — Wells Fargo — Analyst

Joseph Giordano — Cowen and Company — Analyst

Andrew Buscaglia — Berenberg — Analyst

Brett Linzey — Vertical Research Partners — Analyst

Walter Liptak — Seaport Global — Analyst

Matt Summerville — D.A. Davidson — Analyst

Presentation:

Operator

Greetings and welcome to the IDEX Corporation’s First Quarter 2020 Earnings Conference Call. [Operator Instructions]

I will now turn the conference over to our host Mike Yates, Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer. Thank you. You may begin.

Mike Yates — Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer

Thank you, Diego. Good morning, everyone. This is Mike Yates, Vice President and Chief Accounting Officer for IDEX Corporation. Let me start by saying thank you for joining us for a discussion of the IDEX’s first quarter 2020 financial highlights. Last night we issued a press release outlining our Company’s financial and operating performance for the three months ending March 31st, 2020. The press release along with the presentation slides to be used during today’s webcast can be accessed on our Company’s website at www.idexcorp.com.

Joining me today is Andy Silvernail, our Chairman and CEO; and Bill Grogan, our Chief Financial Officer. The format for our call today is as follows. We’ll begin with Andy providing an overview of IDEX’s performance drivers and addressing the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on our operations as well as the Company’s response to date. Bill, we will then discuss our first quarter 2020 financial results and walk you through an assessment of the Company’s liquidity and financial durability through several scenarios. And finally Andy will conclude with our current framework for second quarter and closing remarks. Following our prepared remarks, we will open the call for your questions.

If you should need to exit the call for any reason, you may access a complete replay beginning approximately 2 hours after the call concludes by dialing the toll-free number (877) 660-6853 and entering conference ID number 13694804 or you may simply log on to our Company’s homepage for the webcast replay.

Before we begin, a brief reminder, this call may contain certain forward-looking statements that are subject to the Safe Harbor language in last night’s press release and in IDEX’s filings with the Securities and Exchange Commission.

With that, I’ll turn the call over to our Chairman and Chief Executive Officer, Andy Silvernail.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Mike. I appreciate everyone joining the IDEX’s Q1 earnings call today. I’m starting off on slide 6. The world is spinning with great uncertainty, but as you leave this call today, I want you to feel certain about one thing, IDEX is well positioned to survive and thrive through this COVID-19 crisis. We have the quality of businesses. We have the people and we have the financial wherewithal. We’ve invested in our Company aggressively over the years to build a very special organization. Most important we build a culture. We’ve built a culture with incredibly talented teams who run great businesses that matter to the world. Our culture has helped us react very early to this crisis. We’ve made swift and smart decisions to keep our people safe, to keep our businesses moving and ensure liquidity, making sure that we do everything we can to help win this COVID-19 fight.

IDEX has an important mission that we capture in four words, trusted solutions, improving lives. Our mission has never been more important. In a world consumed with physical, emotional and the financial impact of COVID-19, IDEX plays a critical role in keeping people safe and healthy while helping directly with a fight to defeat it. I’m going to move now to slide 7.

There are so many ways that IDEX is in this fight. In our Fluid & Metering segment, we enable food, energy and industrial supply chains. In Fire, Safety and Diversified we’ve acted swiftly to quadruple the production of our mobile medical tents used by hospitals as they struggle to handle the surge in COVID-19 cases. In the Health & Science Technologies, we’re making compressors using ventilators, mobile carts that produce hospital grade air where it’s not available and compressors for mobile disinfecting sprayers. And of course, we’re also a critical supplier, enabling the genetic sequencing that decoded the RNA of the coronavirus enabling the development of test for COVID-19 and its antibodies as well as finding therapies and hopefully an eventual vaccine. There are dozens more examples across the Company, where we bring essential products to a market in need.

I’m turning now to slide 8. I want to pause here for a moment and thank all of our people across IDEX, especially those in manufacturing, shipping and other rules that require presence in our facilities. We have robust safety protocols at our sites worldwide to protect our people performing essential jobs. The safety of our people will always be the most important consideration as we continue in this new environment. In a crisis, especially, one that’s devastating as this, your true values are exposed. I’ve never been proud of the people of IDEX. From the first sign of the COVID-19 crisis in China, our teams have been collaborating, problem solving and acting. Well, great strategy is a product of this crisis. We’re also seeing the best in who we are.

I’m now moving on to slide 9. On March 20, I held a conference call with investors where I laid out our operating context and our priorities to steer IDEX successfully through this crisis. Much has changed in five weeks, but our point of view and our priorities remain the same. We built our strategy and our operating plans based on four phases of this evolving crisis. I believe we’re now moving out of Phase 1 the acute phase and into Phase 2 which will be a period of ongoing uncertainty and significant challenge for the next three to six months. There’ll be a little visibility as quarantines are lifted and we all work to gradually restart the economy safely.

During this phase, we expect to see a significant drop in demand and production capability as customers, suppliers and our own teams are regularly impacted by shutdowns and shortages. The third phase will be learning to live and work with COVID-19. This will require significant changes to much of what we do. And this period will extend until there is a solution that gives people confidence to engage socially and professionally without fear. While this phase will not be easy, we’ve seen from our businesses in China which have rebounded quickly that we can successfully pivot our approach.

The final phase will be the post virus world. I know we all look forward to this day when normal returns. I’m convinced however that normal will be redefined just as it has been in other severe crisis, like The Great Depression, The Second World War, 9/11 and the financial crisis, there’ll be significant and permanent societal and economic changes. The coronavirus will shape our lives and our economy in countless ways, some easily predictable and others yet unknown. Over the next 12 to 18 months as we move through these phases, it is our job as leaders to successfully transverse Phases 1 through 3 and interface 4 with a Company that is financially strong and an organization that is positioned to thrive.

I’m now turning to slide 10. We’ve outlined four strategies that guide our way to a better future. Our top priority is safety, protecting our teams as we try to remain open, to serve customers that are central to our society. When we are normally highly decentralized, this is a time when we have carefully weighed safety protocols and mandated certain standards worldwide. These have included temperature checks at beginning of all shifts, guidelines for face coverings, cleaning and sanitizing practices and processes for addressing a variety of scenarios from COVID-19 cases to possible exposures.

Our COVID-19 issues and response team has led the way and regularly provides guidance for our local sites as issues arise. And because of the strong procedures, we have in place and the handful of instances where employees have contracted the virus, few of any coworkers have been quarantined. Not only is this good for business, but it’s great for the health, well being and morale of our employees. I’m glad to report that every IDEX employee who has contracted COVID-19 has so far recovered.

To ensure business continuity, which is our second priority, we have developed plans for each site to use in the event of a ramp down of operations. We want to ensure, things are handled smoothly and in a way that prepares the business to return quickly to operations. We are also regularly addressing supply chain concerns. While our supply chains are generally shorter than many of our other global manufacturers, we have quickly addressed issues from lock downs and travel restrictions. So far, our business continuity planning like our security plans can help us avoid more significant business disruptions.

In the months ahead, we expect we’ll be choppier, this extensive planning and support structure, we’ve built should serve our businesses well. Our third area of focus is liquidity. IDEX entered this time with a strong cash position and we have remained cash flow positive, since the beginning of the crisis. Our goal is to remain so throughout, protecting our liquidity and our balance sheet. We’re working with our businesses and finance leaders to help them manage their period unlike anything we have seen in their careers. Bill Grogan, our CFO has instituted a daily cash management practices that he is working with all of our leaders across the globe.

Finally, we’re playing offense, that means different things in different areas of our business. In some instances, it means pivoting to focus on the needs of customers who are now booming as they’re selling essential products. In other instances, it’s meant helping businesses in need like we did in Novotema that’s just outside Bergamo in Italy that was closed. Our sister company PPE in England stepped in and produced seals for medical ventilator manufacturer as Novotema was struggling.

Playing offense also means being prepared to accelerate acquisitions when the market unfreezes and a thoughtful approach to share repurchases. With that I’m going to pause here, I’m going to turn things over to Bill, and he’s going to walk you through an overview of our financials and liquidity.

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Andy. I’ll start with our consolidated financial results on slide 12. Q1 orders of $645 million were down 2% overall and organically. The slowdown in our industrial end markets that we discussed during our previous call was compounded by the impact of the pandemic and most of our geographies and end markets. However, there was positive momentum in our Life Sciences and Pharma businesses. The backlog we built will help fill the decrease in orders we expected in Q2.

First quarter sales of $594 million were 4% — were down 4% overall and 5% organically results early in the quarter were better than expected in most areas of the business outside of China. But as the impact of COVID-19 ramped most of our businesses, with the exception of Life Sciences and Pharma took a negative turn and drove us to the low end of our guide. Q1 gross margins expanded 10 basis points to 45.7% and were up in all three segments, primarily driven by strong price capture, continued productivity initiatives and discretionary cost control. These actions more than offset the negative margin impact of lower volume leverage.

Operating margin was 23.5% down 30 basis points from the prior year mainly driven by the dilutive impact of the Velcora acquisition, which had op margin of 8%, but EBITDA margin of 25% and lower volume leverage. This was offset by our gross margin expansion and SG&A cost actions we took in the fourth quarter of last year. Our Q1 effective tax rate was 20%, which was higher than the 19.5% in the prior year due to a reduction in excess tax benefits related to share-based compensation. First quarter net income was $102 million resulting in an EPS of $1.33, down $0.11 or 8% compared to the prior-year EPS. Finally, free cash flow was $72 million, down 5% compared to the prior year, both 71% of net income compared to 69% last year.

Turning to slide 13 on liquidity. Free cash flow for the trailing 12 months ending March 31st was $473 million or 113% of net income. We continue to be well positioned to weather the current environment. IDEX has consistently generated positive free cash flow in excess of net income through margin expansion, ongoing working capital initiatives, and an effective capital allocation philosophy. LTM adjusted leverage was 1.5 times, providing sufficient capacity to fund all of our business needs and allowing us to quickly pivot to offense as the economic environment improves.

Leverage increased slightly in the quarter as we drew $150 million on our revolver in late March in response to temporary challenges in the short-term funding markets. Cash and cash equivalents totaled $569 million at the end of the quarter. We also have $642 million of availability under our $800 million revolving credit facility. With cash on hand, available financing and conservative leverage, we are confident in our ability to continue to meet our obligations, fund operations and make critical investments in the business.

In relation to $300 million of notes due at the end of the year, we are currently exploring potential options including availing ourselves to the capital markets. As Andy mentioned, we have put in place additional processes to enhance our focus on liquidity and we have actively monitoring conditions with our customers and our suppliers to ensure that we’re able to maintain positive cash flow and mitigate the impact of the challenging environment on cash and working capital. We’re taking all necessary actions to make sure we’re appropriately positioned to operate effectively during this period.

Moving on to slide 14. While we believe that we are well suited to operate in this environment, we are continually monitoring the impact of COVID-19 on our operations and are modeling a number of possible scenarios. These examples are meant to give our investors a picture of our durability, not a reflection of what we expect for full year sales, under our current cost structure, which reflects the structural actions we took in the fourth quarter of 2019. We believe that our annualized breakeven revenue, the point at which we continue to generate positive cash flow is approximately $1.8 billion or 30% decreased to our 2019 sales results.

To be proactive in this uncertain environment, we have developed a playbook with actions to reduce that breakeven point. We have identified, approximately $120 million worth of additional cost reductions, which will drive our breakeven revenue closer to down 35%. This would include bonus actions, eliminating travel, marketing and suppliers and many other discretionary cost items. If the conditions warrant it, we are prepared to take structural cost actions and generate an additional $40 million of reductions resulting in a breakeven revenue point of down 40%.

Lastly, although we intend to fund our dividend, if we were to suspend it, our breakeven point would be as low as 50% down on an annualized basis. We are taking all prudent actions to manage discretionary spending, as we continue to gauge the impact of this volatile environment. At this point, we do not believe that further structural actions are necessary, but we’re staying closely tuned into our end markets and supply chains and are prepared to take additional steps if necessary.

With that, I’ll turn it back over to Andy to review our current view on the second quarter.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Bill. Hey, everybody, I’m on slide 15. As I mentioned in my opening remarks, we believe the next three to six months are going to be extremely challenging, everyone will face the same uncertainty as we reopened the economy safely and execute in an environment were COVID-19 exists and impacts operations potentially in waves. While we believe strongly in the IDEX business model and we’re very well positioned, we acknowledge the challenges that we face across our business units.

We expect revenue in the second quarter could be down as much as 15% to 25%. We know that some of our end markets will be significantly challenged, but those headwinds will be somewhat offset as we continue to deliver mission-critical components to essential customers worldwide. We’ve taken prudent actions to significantly reduce our discretionary costs across our businesses and the steps we took in the fourth quarter of 2019, have positioned us to react to a market that is significantly more challenging than we expected when we started the year. We are closely monitoring our markets and our businesses, and we will react quickly to changes.

To conclude, I’m extremely proud of how our employees have responded to this crisis. And even though the next 12 to 18 months will be challenging for all of us. I know that we will meet this challenge and come out strong on the other side.

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With that, let me pause here and turn it over to questions from the audience. Thank you.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you. At this time, we’ll be conducting our question-and-answer session. [Operator Instructions] Our first question comes from Deane Dray with RBC. Please state your question.

Deane Dray — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Thank you. Good morning, everyone.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Deane.

Deane Dray — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Hey, it’s great to hear the IDEX team and I’m wishing everyone the best. I appreciate the — all of the details in terms of the potential scenarios this morning. And the first question really picks up where Bill left off on page 14 on those scenarios, because, Andy I want to say for the past year, you’ve been asked about the IDEX playbook for a normal recession.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Deane Dray — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

And it really feels like I don’t even know what that is anymore, because we’re far beyond that.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Even do we, Deane.

Deane Dray — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

So it’s just — the idea here is you said if things progress or get worse, it just feels like we’re already there. So talk about — and I know this is a tough conversation, but the deeper cuts that you’re likely going to have to take, like is that $120 million of cost out, is that enough? What are the milestones that you’re looking for here, and then maybe some comments on decrementals?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, you bet. So first of all, first look at the $120 million, that stuff that we are very actively putting our arms around in taking the cost out of, and obviously you can see that even impacted in a positive way to some degree in the first quarter, because we started those actions really as we are coming into February, early part of March. And so there is some benefits there. So we’re grabbing that lever already and we’re grabbing it very aggressively, Deane. So that’s the first thing.

One of the main priorities that I have going through this crisis is to maintain as much of the structure and the talent that we can in IDEX appropriately. And so I am willing for a short period of time to eat some of the incremental cost, Deane to maintain that talent base and to position the Company well. That being said, as you know, we’re very diversified to decentralize business. And so you have companies that, some companies are absolutely growing in this environment and some are really taking it on the chin. And so we’ll have to, you get the appropriate footprint in the appropriate places depending upon how much deeper and how much longer this goes, and but our first priority is to certainly keep the integrity of IDEX intact as much as possible.

So I look at that secondary group of actions that the incremental $40 million steps that we will take, if we have to, but would prefer not to, Deane. In terms of decrementals if you look at it on a sequential basis versus year-over-year, I think that’s probably a good way to look at it, obviously we’re very high contribution margin company, so we have contribution margins in the low-60s. And so if we can offset a good chunk of that and end up in the 40s or 50s without having to make massive structural changes to the Company, we would do so within the short term. But obviously in the longer term, you’ve got to have the appropriate cost structure.

Deane Dray — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

That’s really helpful. And then I just — I appreciate the four phases that you’ve laid out. And I don’t want to minimize how much heavy lifting and frankly some pain to get through all four of these phases. But looking beyond into that new normal, and maybe the ideas of when you will start to shift to offense.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Deane Dray — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

And you’ve got balance sheet now, you didn’t chase expensive deals in the last couple of years, when does M&A makes sense? We know markets have to normalized a bit, but when do you start to flip the switch and play offense here?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, some of that is in our control and some is not. In terms of overall playing offense, we’re doing some of it right now, Deane, we are. If you look across our business, those places where essential products are booming, so, disinfection many of our health and science markets, pharma reshoring, which we think is going to be a major trend. We are playing offense now. We have redirected our people and investment and are making sure that we can, first and foremost help with this fight, but also make sure that we’re doing the right things for our shareholders, our owners.

And so some of that’s happening now. As regards to M&A, there are really two challenges with M&A. First — the first one is having enough confidence in your own situation to deploy that liquidity in our balance sheet. And the second is that you have willing sellers. We are doing an awful lot of work right now on both sides of that equation. So let me talk about the liquidity side. So there is liquidity that is to survive that a lot of people are having to utilize. And at the end of this, they will have a stretched balance sheet and a very difficult circumstances. That is not our situation and I don’t want it to be our situation. Our drive and why we have so much focus on this breakeven level of cash flow is because I want a balance sheet that is deployable, aggressively deployable as the world starts to settle itself.

And so if we can maintain this north of $1 billion of liquidity, as cash flows become more certain, and the market stabilize, we will get aggressive, no doubt about that. Now the other side of the equation is, who are the sellers, and so, as you can imagine right now and you guys are talking to a lot of folks, that’s frozen. It’s just a frozen marketplace. I think it will take through a quarter or so for that to start to unfreeze when Boards of Directors and families are going to look at the situation and recognize that it’s going to take a while and at an attractive price in this marketplace might make sense, but I think it will take a little bit of time being.

Deane Dray — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Thank you. And best of luck to everyone.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Deane.

Operator

Thanks. Our next question comes from Mike Halloran with Baird. Please state your question.

Mike Halloran — Robert W. Baird — Analyst

Hey, good morning, everyone.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Mike.

Mike Halloran — Robert W. Baird — Analyst

So a couple of things. First, when you look at that down 15% to 25%, what’s that predicated on? Is that based on what you’re seeing now? Are there signs of stability after that initial shock downwards? Any kind of context on what kind of logic, you’re using to get to the 15% to 25% down?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So, what I first say is that the 15% is our experience as March unfolded and what we’re seeing here in early April and being a short cycle business, we certainly saw the reaction pretty quickly, both on the ups and the downs by the way in terms of things that are struggling. The industrial businesses are certainly taken it on the chin more so than other businesses. So if you look at FMT, it’s just going to be more painful there, you’ve got the combination of the coronavirus impact and then of course what’s happening in the energy world that’s unfolding. So that 15% is what we’ve experienced here for, call it six, seven weeks Mike, my view is it’s likely to get worse than the 15% and we see kind of slippage happening in a number of places that especially have more impact if you’ve got to say, if you’re in energy, you’re in transportation, those places in particular are really getting pounded. And others are holding up. So I feel pretty comfortable with that range, Mike.

Mike Halloran — Robert W. Baird — Analyst

And then, you alluded to it earlier, but maybe just talk about how you guys are thinking about what the structural changes could look like here? What are some of the things that you’re thinking you might rotate to obviously some of the pharma medical stuff you already mentioned? Anything else you’re thinking about and then how do you prepare for it in the short term here and down set with all the other things as you have up in the year?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. You know I think one of the things that really works in our favor in this environment is our structure. It could be an impediment. We put that rapid response team in place very early on, because we knew that our decentralization and in terms of kind of how we’re structured worldwide, we knew that we could end up with kind of 45 different answers. And so there were certain things that you just couldn’t have 45 different answers on. And we’ve been able to move very quickly.

In this case, in terms of playing offense, Mike, our structure helps us at time, because the places that are really struggling with massive demand fall-offs you can isolate them specifically and you can start redirecting resources to things that are exiting. I’ll give you an example. So in the world of health and science, we have a significant demand for engineering right now, because of all the new things that are developing whether it’s from testing which you’re seeing, PCR test take off, that we’re helping with. We needed engineering, and we actually redirected engineering from our — from our business in rescue to help our business in health and science.

And so we’re doing a bunch of things like that, Mike. So we’re definitely moving to those opportunities and moving people and resources. In terms of those, the big structural changes, I think they’re going to happen around a lot of things touching our health and science world. I think — if I think about, say the food supply chain that’s going to be an area that I think will be impacted. There’s a lot of talk of reshoring in terms of moving things out of more difficult or more risky environments, and that will happen. That was already happening, but it’s not like a big boom like, I think it’s a relatively slow phase. But overall, I feel like we’re positioned well, and our structure really helps us move to the areas where opportunity and demand are likely to be and move away from places that are likely to be hit harder.

Mike Halloran — Robert W. Baird — Analyst

Thanks for that. And then one just clarification, on slide 14, the breakeven cash flow, is that a free cash flow before capex or after capex?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

After.

Mike Halloran — Robert W. Baird — Analyst

All right. Great. Thank you. Appreciate it.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Bill, that’s right, isn’t it?

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Mike Halloran — Robert W. Baird — Analyst

Yeah. Great. I thought that, I just want to make sure. I appreciate it.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, thanks.

Operator

Our next question comes from Scott Graham with Rosenblatt Securities. Please state your question.

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

Hey, good morning. And as usual, Andy, thank you for your frankness and clarity.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, thanks, Scott.

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

So — sure, so, I just want to make sure that we’re, on the least thinking about what you’re saying about decrementals correctly. So if we are at 15% to 20% thinking for decline in this quarter sales. If I choose the midpoint and say minus 20% just for example sake.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

I’m taking that number multiplying it by 50% and that’s your decline in operating income this quarter, is it simple as that, right?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, plus or minus. Yeah.

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

Okay. That’s close enough. And within that, how much of the $120 million discretionary are we talking about? In other words, what I’m trying to get to hear is that…

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

I got you, yeah.

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

Is it $50 million this quarter, next quarter, it could be $40 million so on, that would be helpful.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Okay. I think I understand your question, Scott, but if I don’t get it right, just reiterate or help me out here. So the $120 million is an annual number, right. And because we’re not that seasonal, and our fixed cost structure doesn’t that variable, you could basically take the $30 million a quarter. And that’s going to come out of there. And that’s pretty much coming out now. It might be a little bit more as time goes on, but that’s coming out pretty darn rapidly. And that’s what enables you to go from instead of having to be a 62% or 63% negative flow through, that’s what helps you kind of ratchet that down over time. So Bill, is anything you’d add there?

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

No, I think some of the items, maybe a little bit less in the second, that would ramp up, but it’s close.

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

Okay. Okay. That’s…

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Did I answer your question, Scott?

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

Yes, for all intensive purposes, the $30 million quarterly is kind of the exit rate right now.

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, it is…

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

I mean we’ve clamped down so hard here that we’re not spending money on things that don’t have kind of a direct, that aren’t essential, right? That $120 million is really clamping that down.

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

Okay, got you. Two other questions, what would be the trigger for the $40 million. What level of sales? Is it this 35% to 40% decline in sales. That’s the trigger for the structural?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

You know, there is — to some degree, Scott, it is an amount, but more than anything else, it’s what we think the duration is going to look like. Right. So if we’re going to reset the business, let’s just say down 20%, let’s just use that number just as an example. And you’re no longer a $2.5 billion Company, you’re now a $2 billion Company, you have to have a different cost structure, right, if you think that’s going to be sustained for a period of time. And so that’s what we’re really trying to evaluate is, what we think the duration and the depth is likely to be, and it’s a combination of those two that would trigger us to look at the $40 million.

We didn’t feel like we had to do that today. We felt like we should buy ourselves some time and we have with $120 million. And so we’ll continue to evaluate that as you know, we took out a big chunk here in the fall. We took out $15 million and we had another $5 million, which obviously we’ve gone and got. So we were although we hadn’t predicted this. We did predict a tough year. And so we went and proactively got that $20 million out. And so we’ll decide on depth and duration here as we go through this quarter to figure out whether or not we want to take out the other $40 million.

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

No, I got you. That’s very clear. And then I think you’re actually in that answer, just answered my third question which was sort of the way that slide 14 was structured to do 30% 35% and 40% and higher revenue declines that is both depth and duration in these numbers.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

It is. It is. Yeah.

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

Right. Your organic, you’re thinking for the second quarter, if it’s minus 15% to 25%, even if it ends up at 25% what you were talking about here is on an annualized basis, there would be a duration here that would get us to these numbers.

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Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

That’s right, Scott. And I want to be very clear. Bill said that in his in his remarks, but just so everyone hears this correctly. We are not — do not use these as a guidance for where we think the world is going. This is really for an example only, and we are trying to get a couple messages across the year. And I think probably they’ve landed, but to adjust in case, message one was, there is a lot that can happen in this world, before we become, before we have a cash flow issue. And therefore, we don’t have a liquidity issue. We have tons of liquidity. But we’re not going to — I don’t believe we’re going to utilize that liquidity to stay afloat. I want to utilize that liquidity to play really aggressive offense.

And so hopefully that came across the number one, we’re in a great position from a cash flow standpoint, and number two, our liquidity is really being pointed towards playing offense from the moment is correct aggressively.

Scott Graham — Rosenblatt Securities — Analyst

Yeah. Page 14 is much clear to me now. Thank you, guys.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Great. Thanks, Scott.

Nathan Jones — Stifel — Analyst

Our next question comes from Nathan Jones with Stifel. Please state your question. Good morning, everyone.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Nathan.

Nathan Jones — Stifel — Analyst

I guess I’ll go a little further on the cash flow side. Slide 14, here we’re looking at revenue changes and expense changes, maybe we could look at the working capital side of this.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Nathan Jones — Stifel — Analyst

I guess you should clearly have some source of cash out of inventory, maybe you could talk about what you’re expecting there. If you’re seeing any slowdown in DSOs or changes in receivable collections or any changes in customer behavior, as maybe they’re getting stressed out, any more color you can give us on that side of the equation.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, I’ll comment on this. And then, Bill, I’ll let you comment on it also. From, in terms of how we’re managing this. I think this in a couple of ways. The first one is inventory. We got to make sure it comes out naturally as volume gets affected. Right. That is — that has been a winning move in any slowdown for us. And historically, we have taken out inventory and that’s obviously had a very positive cash effect in any kind of slow down. So you should expect us to continue to do that and take cash off the balance sheet or cash out of inventory rather than on the balance sheet.

In terms of payables and receivables, my philosophy here is, don’t be the bank, meaning, we can get caught between customers and suppliers. At the same time, I want to be very careful about not damaging customers and suppliers here. So if we can — if we can end up neutral in that regard, and really play that strategically, I think that’s important. Obviously we’ve got suppliers that we want to make sure they are healthy, they are our partners. This is not a time to beat on them when they’re struggling. At the same time we can’t finance them. And so as our customers are coming to us and asking for relief, we’re really weighing that against what we can do across the working capital spectrum. And so we’re being pretty firm. We’ve got excellent service levels. We’ve got great lead times competitively. We’re not going to become the bank.

Nathan Jones — Stifel — Analyst

Okay. So the target payables and receivables net cash neutral and inventory is the source.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Nathan Jones — Stifel — Analyst

Okay. My second question is on pricing, you guys have reported positive net pricing every year for as long as I can remember, including 2009.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Nathan Jones — Stifel — Analyst

This is clearly a little different, I think maybe a little steeper in the short term here, do you guys think you can still be net price positive or at least net price neutral in this kind of environment?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

I’m pretty hopeful that we can stay positive. The price that we put out at the beginning of the year, that was already out and going. And so I don’t see why that won’t stick. That — I think there will be some challenges next year as we think about pricing about whether or not we can, how aggressive we can be there. Bill, on those two topics, do you want to — you want to give your view?

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I would say, our price capture in the first quarter was in line with what we experienced for most of last year. And I guess my only comment on the working capital pieces, there are some selective businesses that took some actions at target to build some buffer stock relative to supply chains in certain countries that we’re shutting down. So first quarter inventory performance was good, impacted slightly, based upon some of those builds and to Andy’s point we fully anticipate to believe that off here in the second quarter. But price capture is still strong across the portfolio.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Bill, what’s your view of price here as we think about this year unfolds?

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I mean, obviously we’ll get more challenging, as we go through the balance of the year as customers are more impacted, but I think our core pricing initiatives that we have across the portfolio, we will remain positive. Does it come down slightly potentially, but overall, price cost, still positive for us.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Nathan Jones — Stifel — Analyst

Okay, thanks a lot. I’ll pass it on.

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Nathan.

Operator

Our next question comes from Allison Poliniak with Wells Fargo. Please state your question.

Allison Poliniak — Wells Fargo — Analyst

Hi guys, good morning.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Hey, good morning, Allison.

Allison Poliniak — Wells Fargo — Analyst

So, Andy, I just want to talk maybe higher level IDEX, you built a really solid foundation. Here, you talked about that and then you mentioned through these phases, but particularly if you go to that, the new normal, is there anything that’s really coming to late here in terms of portfolio growth, it sounds like you’re starting to pivot some of that near term organic investment to some of these new applications and just trying to get a sense if that’s temporary or if it’s sort of potentially a new direction here for IDEX?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So I think we’ve had a lot of things come out of it, Allison. In terms of opportunities that where people have come to us on trying to help with very specific things relative to the COVID-19 crisis. And as we have evaluated those, we’ve been pretty careful and what I mean by that is what we don’t want to do is take a bunch of people and resources and ship them to something where the lead time is so long that effectively when you bring your solution to bear, it doesn’t matter anymore. And so there are going to be a bunch of boom and bust cycles in this, of different things that are coming to market, both because they are very effective and then, that is no longer needed or they weren’t particularly effective and they washed away.

And so we’re trying to avoid those kind of things and we’re trying to move the portfolio to things that are really about helping the fight, where we have capabilities, and we can ramp really quickly. And I use the mobile medical tents out of our better unit in Germany. We sold more in the month of March, we sold as much in the month of March as we sold all of last year. And so we’ve ramped that up. They’ve literally quadrupled their overall capacity here as we go through the rest of this year. And so that makes a ton of sense. It doesn’t take any major investment or capability that we don’t have. So we’re moving into those sorts of things very aggressively.

As we think longer term, I think there are some trends here that are very natural for us. So obviously around global testing that was already a trend that, that was growing, and it was what we had positioned ourselves behind an IDEX Health & Science, and that is going to accelerate. I think that’s indefinite. And what I mean by testing is, is testing kind of anything and everything that analytical equipment is used for and bio-diagnostic testing is used for. That stuff is just going to continue to grow very aggressively and we’re going to continue to position ourselves against that.

And then things like, I think — I think the pharma reshoring is the real deal, and so our material process business as an example, we will absolutely play in that. And I think that’s going to be a long-term trend, it’s going to take a long time for that to happen, but I believe that that sort of thing is going to develop. And then you have kind of all those other trends that I think are going to get accelerated, because people frankly have had to change their lives so much that it’s going to be easier to move into some of these trends. I’m thinking trends like digitization, mobile communications and how that impacts even say, a Viking pump where the customer is going to become a lot more comfortable utilizing and expecting digital results and information based results, and I think that will move some of those things forward faster.

Allison Poliniak — Wells Fargo — Analyst

Great, that’s helpful. And then you mentioned China, it sounds like it’s coming out of — it’s coming through this and going into the recovery phase. As this rules through globally, any lesson learned or your approach, has it evolved differently, as you head each region based on what’s been going on in China? Any color there?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, that’s a great question, Allison, and I think, kind of moving from east to west in terms of how this has — this crisis has unfolded, we’ve been learning along the way. And we’ve done a few things. So our Chinese businesses, they really led the way here and, in creating protocols for safe working. And we have every single one of our plants is up right now. Not everything is at full capacity, but even our places in Northern Italy are up and working. And I’ll give a lot of credit to that because, we learned very early on, had to ramp down, had to ramp back up and had to work in an environment where the virus is with you. And we created a protocol and a playbook out of that. We then changed that and augmented that for different parts of the world, and we actually very soon, we actually shared that with the MAPI group, the Manufacturers Alliance for Productivity and Innovation, we shared with them that and they shared with all of their members.

And our team just did a great job putting that together. And so that’s the basis of that and we’re continuing to learn. We also here, I guess it was last week we did a general managers call, a global general managers and site managers call and we had four of our general managers from Italy on that call, taking people through their experience. And I mean the physical experience of what they’ve gone through the emotional side of it, how to keep people safe. We did a kind of a virtual lunch and learn for everybody around those learnings. And so one of the things that we’re trying to leverage here is the network effect of having so many sites around the world where we can learn and share and get the best practices out of people’s hand. So, and we’ve been trying to do that really intently, Allison.

Allison Poliniak — Wells Fargo — Analyst

That sounds great. Stay safe everybody. Thanks.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Allison.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Joe Giordano with Cowen. Please state your question.

Joseph Giordano — Cowen and Company — Analyst

Hey, guys, good morning.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Joe.

Joseph Giordano — Cowen and Company — Analyst

So, you guys just closed an energy deal. I know it’s kind of a specific niche technology. Can you just talk about your overall exposure there? What you’re seeing in the way you guys play in the energy markets?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, so Joe, I think as you know, we are principally a midstream player and so we’re not really anywhere near the wellhead, for the most part, we have some things here and there, but not a ton. Look across the energy business, which today is sub 10% of our total portfolio, we have an expectation that that’s really going to get hammered here. So far we haven’t had that — it hasn’t been as severe as we expect it to be, but we are certainly seeing all those indicators now on the order front. And so we’ll have to get our cost structure, right and our overall footprint right to make sure that we can sustain that.

I think everybody learned the lesson in 2015, 2016, that the overall impact of capital spending and how the energy economy impacts the global economy can’t be overestimated. Right. It’s — that’s going to be, it’s going to obviously you can exacerbate this whole situation and we’re going to have to make sure that our businesses are positioned correctly as we go forward. But thankfully, we’re not in the — on the wellhead and seeing some of these just ridiculous declines. And we will see declines, but it won’t be like we’re seeing upstream.

Joseph Giordano — Cowen and Company — Analyst

When you think of, I mean, it’s hard now to think about like new investments, you have to make when you’re –we’re trying to rip out costs at the same time, but as you think about your global footprint, there is something like this make you have to step back and like rethink the way you even have your facility set up, like there’s a workflow have to look different in the future. Do you have to — this headcount, have to be totally different and that has to be more automated like what kind of — how do you just think about how your global plants look coming out of that?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

You know, Joe, I think that question as we move now, through that, what I call Phase 3 is going to be one of the most important questions that we are we’re wrestling with, because when you think about a manufacturing facility, especially one that is principally assembly and test. I mean, obviously, we do have businesses that are more than that, but we tend to be light machining assembly and test and we have a couple of businesses that have the foundries, and that’s pretty unusual though.

And in world like that, obviously, we’ve all embraced lean manufacturing here for many decades and the natural output of lean manufacturing, the cellular manufacturing, which does not work with social distancing, the way it’s constructed today. People are not six feet apart. And so we are, we will, we’re already in the process of doing that. How do you see the elements, how do you keep the elements of lean manufacturing, which is the elimination of waste and bringing down lead times. How do you keep those while having the principles of social distancing in place and that’s something that we’re working on, I know a lot of people are.

And we’re not going to move the batch manufacturing, we’re not going to do that sort of thing and destroy three decades of great work. But it does change how people work and not just in the manufacturing environment, so, you can change in the office environment. It’s going to change it how we interact with customers. So many things like that are going to change and tell people have that comfort to be closer together again.

Joseph Giordano — Cowen and Company — Analyst

Thanks for the color.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Joe.

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instructions] Our next question comes from Andrew Buscaglia with Berenberg. Please state your question.

Andrew Buscaglia — Berenberg — Analyst

Hey, guys.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Andrew.

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Andrew Buscaglia — Berenberg — Analyst

If you could — if you could talk, I’m getting the sense directionally for the year, FMT gets hit probably the worst and then Fire & Safety maybe second worse than Health & Science, maybe third worst, because there are some partial offsetting factors. Would you agree with that?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

I would.

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yeah.

Andrew Buscaglia — Berenberg — Analyst

Okay. In those other segments, are there — you’re talking about some partially offsetting factors maybe in Health & Science. Are there any in the other two segments? Is there anything else you’re seeing that could go the other way as a positive?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Yeah. So I think as you — as you look at say, let’s look at FMT first, I think that obviously the whole agricultural space has been really beaten up, but I do believe that food supply chains are going to be — continue to be really critical. And so I think that’s a — and overall, a good trend as you talk about ag in terms of where we play there. And that would be both for the material handling business, material process business and for Banjo, I put in both of those. Our ADS business, we are seeing some benefit to actually, there are some very interesting analytics that can be done for what’s going on in sewer systems, believe it or not.

I know that sounds incredibly strange, but there is a whole bunch of modeling that, and analytics that are allowed to or can happen, because of our ability to monitor those system. So our ADS business we think we’ll probably hold up pretty well in there. And then I think that the more industrial facing kind of general industrial is going to have a bunch of things that are pretty negative offset by small things that are positive. So example, if you’re selling into the chemical industry, obviously, there are some chemicals around disinfectants and things like that, that are absolutely booming, and then you have other things that are going into large capex that are likely to really struggle.

So there are few trends there over and diversified. On the fire side that interestingly enough, there are a number of applications where you can use some of that technology for disinfecting, so you’ll see some of that. You’ve got a really long a very, very long pipeline of for — in the fire business forward for trucks and the US particularly, you’ve got over a year of backlog. What we don’t know yet is whether or not we’ll see cancellations. We have not seen that yet, but we’ll have to monitor that pretty closely. We’ve seen in China, the rescue business pick back up aggressively has slowed down as tenders slowed down and then has picked back up aggressively. And so I think those hold up. BAND-IT and Dispensing both, I think take it on the chin here in the short-term, because their exposure one around the retail space. And for Dispensing and then for BAND-IT you’ve got some exposure to transportation and oil and gas, that will get hit, but other parts will do quite well.

Andrew Buscaglia — Berenberg — Analyst

Okay. Yeah that’s good. That’s some good color.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks.

Andrew Buscaglia — Berenberg — Analyst

If you could — if you could maybe just one last question on, same question but related to margins, I would think FMT would get hit hardest, because it seems like in Fire & Safety you got some, you’ve made some changes there that structurally maybe they, maybe those are okay or not okay. But fair better than FMT, is that safe to say.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. I think…

Andrew Buscaglia — Berenberg — Analyst

In terms of, like the decline it will see.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, I think FMT will fare, will be the most challenged and then Diversified and then Health & Science.

Andrew Buscaglia — Berenberg — Analyst

Exactly. Yeah. Okay, got it. Thank you.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Thanks, Andrew.

Operator

Our next question comes from Brett Linzey with Vertical Research Partners. Please state your question.

Brett Linzey — Vertical Research Partners — Analyst

Hey, good morning, everyone.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Brett.

Brett Linzey — Vertical Research Partners — Analyst

Wanted to come back to your comment, in the past six to seven weeks, you mentioned you’re running down mid-teens. What does the range look like there? And then just thinking about the complexion across the geographies as we do reopen commerce, how are you thinking about the pace of return between the US and Europe?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, just to make sure I understand, Brett, the question you’re asking. Are you asking kind of the range of outcomes kind of business by business, like how bad to how good is that what you’re…

Brett Linzey — Vertical Research Partners — Analyst

Well, I mean, yeah, I mean you’re saying on average things around mid teens. I mean there’s probably some growth in there which does imply, some business is down, 30% 40%, is that — is that the right math?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, we’ve got a couple of businesses that we think are going to be down in that 40% range. Very few are, is that to severe, but then you do have a couple, and again it’s energy, transportation exposure. We don’t have really hospitality exposure, so to speak, so we don’t have that. But we do have some businesses that are down there that much and we expect we’ll probably in the next quarter or two, we’ll have that kind of impact. We don’t think that will stay long, and I think that your question, our experienced in China has been a very, very aggressive snap back. And but it’s actually bifurcated. You have businesses that are kind of COVID facing, so to speak, that are helping with the fight that are growing like crazy.

And then you’ve got a few businesses that are kind of really in the dumpsters, but it’s actually come back pretty quickly. I don’t think that that’s the model for the rest of the world and for a number of reasons. Obviously, China has some very unique circumstances in how they are able to manage the people and businesses and democracies just don’t have those tools. And that’s the cost of democracy, which is I think a good cost. And so I think it’s going to look a lot more like we’re seeing in Europe, which is you’re going to see people starting to figure out how to live with this virus and figure out, how can you still have social distancing, but get back to work, get back to friends and family. And so that means it just takes longer.

And that’s what we’re seeing certainly in Italy, and that’s what I expect here. And just to be clear, our expectation here is that, this is going to be fits and starts. I am not someone who has bought into a super aggressive, everything gets fine in the fall, sort of thing, I think that’s crazy talk. And I think we have to face the reality that’s in front of us. And you know what, if we get lucky and for some reason this goes away with weather or something else, or a vaccine is found more quickly than we think or you have very, very effective treatments, great news. I don’t think anybody should bank on that and I certainly wouldn’t manage the Company expecting that.

Brett Linzey — Vertical Research Partners — Analyst

Okay, great. And I appreciate that. And then just one last one, I was hoping you could spend just a moment on the evolution of the portfolio and not so much from a product standpoint, you gave a lot of good examples earlier, but just in terms of service or the recurring elements of the portfolio. What’s that mix look like today. I mean obviously service is going to be impacted here near term, but kind of in a new normal, what is the recurring limit IDEX look like?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. We’ve never been a company that has the classic, sort of, high recurring revenue, so to speak, and the reason I say that is that, we don’t have a big parts business but we tend to sell into like for like very, very high percentage of our applications. And so, you know, Bill, I don’t know what’s your estimate of total sort of recurring? How would you, how would you characterize that?

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

That’s greater than 50%.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, I agree with that. And so, look, when you have the financial crisis. Our total business was down 14% during that year right after that over the entire year. Our Health & Science business was down 5% and I think our industrial businesses were down say 20%, and those environments would set us up off. We have a better portfolio positioning than we did then. I mean it’s less cyclical and is more Health & Science in the mix. And so I feel, I feel good about that. So overall, I think our portfolio and our position is pretty good. Albeit, there will be a couple of places that will get hit really hard.

Brett Linzey — Vertical Research Partners — Analyst

Okay, great. I really appreciate all the detail probably what’s [Phonetic]…

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instructions] Our next question comes from Walter Liptak with Seaport Global. Please state your question.

Walter Liptak — Seaport Global — Analyst

Hi, thanks, good morning, guys.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Walter.

Walter Liptak — Seaport Global — Analyst

I wanted to ask a question about the municipal businesses, your comments so far that fire, okay. China picked up pretty quick. Yeah. I wonder how the municipal businesses you think will do this time if there’s anything different more challenging either financially or maybe benefits. I think you mentioned the sewer business could have some benefits. I wonder if can just talk about muni.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

I think historically the municipal businesses have had 18 month to two-year lag time compared to other businesses and that’s really driven by receipts, right, especially in the western world the — as the receipts come in that really sets the overall operating and capital budgets. And so I expect there to be a little bit quicker reaction. Then you saw in the financial crisis that in the financial crisis that took time I remember that well, where the municipal business has held up really well as we went into that crisis.

And then they started to really struggle as you got into 2008 — excuse me, 2010, 2011. It — that took some time for that to make its way through and then had, obviously had — has had a pretty strong overall run. I expect that will generally follow a similar path, although, I think it’ll be more. I think people will act faster just because it’s been such a shock to the global system and everybody’s top of mind that municipalities are going to probably clamp down a little more quickly on their spending. I expect to see that, but I do think it will still lag the overall industrial economy.

Walter Liptak — Seaport Global — Analyst

Okay, great. Thanks. And then last one for me just about the share buyback. I wonder if you can just remind us how much is left…

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Walter Liptak — Seaport Global — Analyst

And the share repurchase authorization? And how you’re thinking about it in the second quarter and in the second-half?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, you bet. So we did buy just over $100 million of shares. We had a 10b5-1 in place going into this, and so we did buy just over $100 million. We did shut that 10b5-1 down, as we looked at the value of liquidity and the uncertainty that we were in. We valued the certainty more than we did the incremental share buyback. So we did pause that.

Look, I know there’s going to be a lot of — people are going to be looking really hard at those who buy back shares and I know in some ways it’s turned into a political football. I don’t think that we are in that category number one, obviously, we’re kind of pretty low on the overall visibility food chain here, so I don’t worry too much about that.

Second, we’re not going to be a Company that takes cash from the government, I can’t see where we’re going to do that in a way that restricts us in any way to our behaviors. And then finally, look, we are going to utilize our liquidity the best way we can to help all of our stakeholders. And if what that means is to buy back shares, then we will do so appropriately. In terms of what we have in total, I can honestly say, we only have the $500 million that we got authorization for back a few weeks ago, plus you add that on, I think, Bill, to what about?

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

It’s a little over $700 million. Yeah. Little over $700 million.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah.

Walter Liptak — Seaport Global — Analyst

Okay, great. Okay. Thanks, guys.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Our next question comes from Matt Summerville with D.A. Davidson. Please state your question.

Matt Summerville — D.A. Davidson — Analyst

Thanks. Just a quick one. Most of mine have been answered. But just with respect to life sciences and pharma, the strength you’re seeing there, is that COVID-19-related? Or is that something else? And could you put that in the context of the $50 million improvement, I believe, you saw in overall backlog? How that component plays out looking forward?

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. You’ve got — there are two stories in there, Matt. So the first one is yes, there is absolutely a pickup from COVID-related activities. There’s no doubt about that, that we’re seeing in life sciences. But also, we have a number of very important customers that have programs that are ramping. And we have won some substantial business and we had some really nice orders here in the quarter relative to that. And so that’s been strong. So it’s both, ongoing programs that are really important and then you’ve got the impact of COVID-19 to get two things going at once. And, Bill, I don’t know what — in total, what does that make up of the $50 million of backlog, Bill?

William Grogan — Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

It was a little over $30 million from HST.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So that will give you a sense, Matt.

Matt Summerville — D.A. Davidson — Analyst

Thank you.

Operator

Thank you. Ladies and gentlemen, there are no further questions at this time. I’ll turn it back to management for closing remarks.

Andrew Silvernail — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Great. Thank you very much, and thank you all for being on the call. I know that we’re sitting in a time that has shaken us in many ways. And I think I’d like to close with a couple of comments. My first one is that, as I said in my prepared remarks, I could not be more proud of how the team here at IDEX has handled this. I have seen a level of collaboration and teamwork and positivity that — it really warms the heart. It’s just incredible. And when you see that, sometimes the news cycles have a tendency to get you down.

And — but when you see how people are coming together in the real world and tackling this, it is awesome, and it’s why I’m in business. I believe that the purpose of business is to make life better, and I could not be more proud of the team at IDEX for what they’ve done. It’s just remarkable. Second, I’d like to say thank you to, everybody, who is on this call and your interest in IDEX. We — while the IDEX brand is not well-known in the consumer world, we play a very important role in a lot of places that really do matter. And that mission that I talked about trusted solutions and improving lives, we live that here at IDEX. And we’re seeing in this crisis in this fight with COVID-19 how important that is.

And I want to thank the people who are investors in the Company and prospective investors for your support, your partnership as we move through this, and we will move through this and we will get to the other side and we will have a very strong company that’s positioned extremely well. So thank you, everybody, I appreciate it and look forward to discussions as we go forward. Take care.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

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