Categories Earnings Call Transcripts, Finance

LendingClub Corporation (LC) Q4 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

LC Earnings Call - Final Transcript

LendingClub Corp (NYSE: LC) Q4 2020 earnings call dated Mar. 10, 2021

Corporate Participants:

Sameer Gokhale — Investor Relations

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

Tom Casey — Chief Financial Officer

Analysts:

Steven Kwok — KBW — Analyst

John Rowan — Janney Montgomery Scott — Analyst

Bill Ryan — Compass Point — Analyst

Presentation:

Operator

Good afternoon and welcome to LendingClub’s Fourth Quarter and Full Year 2020 Earnings Call. [Operator Instructions] Please note this event is being recorded.

I would now like to turn the conference over to Sameer Gokhale, Head of Investor Relations. Please go ahead.

Sameer Gokhale — Investor Relations

Thank you and good afternoon. Welcome to LendingClub’s fourth quarter and full year 2020 earnings conference call. Joining me today to talk about our results and recent events are Scott Sanborn, CEO; and Tom Casey, CFO. Please note that in addition to the presentation we usually provide with our quarterly results we are also sharing a LendingClub Bank’s presentation that provides information about our business, including our new banking capabilities. You can find both presentations accompanying our earnings release on the Investor Relations section of our website.

Our remarks today will include forward-looking statements that are based on our current expectations and forecasts and involve risks and uncertainties. These statements include, but are not limited to, future products and services, the effectiveness of certain strategy initiatives, anticipated financial results and the impact and benefit of the various acquisition and resulting bank charter on our business. Our actual results may differ materially from those contemplated by these forward-looking statements. Factors that could cause these results to differ materially are described in today’s press release and our most recent forms 10-K and 10-Q, each as filed with the SEC, as well as our subsequent filings made with the Securities and Exchange Commission, including our upcoming Form 10-K.

Any forward-looking statements that we make on this call are based on assumptions as of today, and we undertake no obligation to update these statements as a result of new information or future events. Also, during this call, we will present and discuss both GAAP and non-GAAP financial measures. A description of non-GAAP measures and reconciliation to GAAP measures are included in today’s earnings release and related slide presentation. The press release and accompanying presentations are available through the Investor Relations section of our website at ir.lendingclub.com.

And now, I’d like to turn the call over to Scott.

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Sameer. Good afternoon, everybody, and thank you for joining us today. We are very excited to share the update on our business now that the acquisition of Radius is complete. We’ve worked long and hard to get to this point and we are very bullish about how we’re positioned to add value to our customers and deliver consistent and sustained multi-year earnings growth for our shareholders. It’s really hard to imagine a better time to be launching a digital bank. We have got a lot of information to share today and the financial expression of our business will be changing considerably. So Tom and I are going to split this up.

I will focus my time on how the addition of the bank enhances our business and enables us to deliver on our strategy. And I’ll let Tom provide the details on last quarter’s results and how the acquisition informs our financial outlook for the year. When we launched back in 2007, LendingClub’s vision was to leverage technology, data and our marketplace model to transform the banking industry. We began by bringing a traditional credit product, the installment loan into the digital edge by moving it online, broadening access, lowering costs and delivering a fast and frictionless experience. We redefined the category and by 2019 personal loans were the fastest growing segment of consumer finance and we became the largest personal loan company in America generating more than a $1 billion in loan volume per month and helping more than 3 million customers lower their costs of credit and get on the path to eliminating their credit card debt.

Getting out of debt is in fact our members’ number one goal and they love us for what we’re doing for them. Our NPS score is approaching a truly outstanding 80, that’s well above many leading brands and traditional banks and the pandemic has demonstrated that they prioritize our loans above many of their other debt obligations including even credit cards. And half of them return to us again within five years providing us a virtually free source of loan volume, which we reward with a further simplified process and even lower rates compared to their first loan. Easy access to responsible low cost unsecured credit is a primary pain point for our members.

And it represents a huge immediately addressable market that’s expected to grow at more than 20% annually over the coming years. But it’s not the only pain point and our mission to empower our members on their path to financial health doesn’t end here. A note, our customers are not the under-banked or those shut out of the financial system. These are high-income, highly credit worthy individuals who are already fully utilizing bank services. In fact, they’re some of retail banking’s most profitable customers. It’s just working out better for the banks than it is for them. That’s because together with their higher than average income they also have higher than average debt including credit card, auto and student loans.

They want to put this debt behind them and they are highly motivated and willing to take action to get there. And as a digital marketplace bank, we can now do so much more to help. And our members tell us they are ready and eager for us to do so. In a recent survey 83% said they’re interested in more products and services from LendingClub. With the digital bank acquisition closed, we can take the next step. First up, we’ll be building on Radius’ multi-award winning online and mobile deposit offering to make it very easy for our customers to manage their lending, spending and savings in a holistic fashion. Because we’re vertically integrated, we can capture more value both from lending and from spending and can use this together with the behavioral data we’ll be collecting to offer powerful benefits and value to our customers.

This sets LendingClub apart from the neo-bank and fintech competition. What’s even more exciting is that the bank is being added to an already formidable platform with two sizable benefits. First, as you can see on slide 9 of the LendingClub Bank presentation we have incredible data superiority. We have 14 years of history on $60 billion in loans to millions of customers informed by rigorous testing resulting in a 140 billion data cells added to our proprietary database. Access to this vast amount of data gives us a significant competitive advantage. Our team of more than 130 data analysts and scientists mined this historical data with leading edge machine learning and AI analytic techniques to continuously refine our dozens of proprietary models to optimize fraud risk, repayment risk, loan exposure and loan pricing. And it’s working.

Our experience shows that our proprietary scoring system is 20 times more effective than traditional credit score such as FICO at predicting default. As a result, we can approve more borrowers, offer significantly lower interest rates and price competitively for attractive risk-adjusted returns across the credit spectrum. Benchmarking data from one of the leading online aggregator shows that our loan offers are priced very competitively and are very likely to be ranked as best-in-class. In several independent studies including those conducted by the Philadelphia Federal Reserve researchers confirm our ability to make credit more affordable than traditional alternatives. Coming out of the pandemic, the strength of our underwriting has now also been cycle tested.

Losses on loans issued pre-COVID are in line with our pre-pandemic expectations, and loans issued since the pandemic are some of our best performing loans in recent years. So we haven’t just collected a wealth of data, we’re leveraging it and it’s clearly giving us an edge. Another key differentiator is our technology infrastructure. Our tech team encompasses nearly 400 Lending Clubbers. We built proprietary software and systems that enable us to deliver seamless highly automated access to credit and deliver a fantastic customer experience. We’ve issued 13 patents and have 27 pending. It would take others many years and a significant capital outlay to try and replicate the competitive mode that we’ve created.

With the acquisition of Radius we’re adding to our competitive advantages by evolving to a unique and powerful new business model, a marketplace bank. As you can see on slide 10, this model wins against both traditional banks and against fintech marketplaces. Versus banks we expect to grow more rapidly fueled by the combination of interest income from our high earning assets together with significant fee-based income from our capital light marketplace. We’ll be even more efficient at customer acquisition supported by our national footprint and our ecosystem with funding partners that allow us to serve a broader range of customers than a typical bank.

And we’ll be highly adaptable at a lower operating cost as a digital-first entity unencumbered by legacy tech infrastructure or high cost branches. We also have advantages over pure fintech marketplaces, the limitations of which we understand better than anybody and that’s why we’ve evolved our business model. Versus fintech marketplaces, our marketplace bank will be more resilient with access to stable funding, a recurring and sustained revenue stream and a clear and established regulatory framework. And we’ll be able to reach higher profitability given our lower funding costs and higher earnings per loan. All of these advantages position us well to capitalize on a clear trend that has been accelerated due to COVID, the move to digital banking.

Bank is no longer a place you go. It’s a thing you do, increasingly from your mobile phone. And consumers are now more than ever weighing the importance of that experience versus proximity to a bank branch. With one of the best mobile experiences in the industry, we’re starting from a good place here. I’ve been with LendingClub for more than 10 years and I have never been more excited about the combination of capabilities and market conditions for us to achieve our ambitions and transform the industry. Our marketplace bank begins today with an industry-leading loan and deposit products, a strong brand and loyal customer base, considerable technology and data advantages and a differentiated offering that allows us to better serve an expanded total addressable market, which will allow us to drive sustained earnings growth.

Near-term personal loans will be our primary economic driver and we plan to grow our originations by 45% and revenue by 55% this year. As Tom will lay out for you in a minute, the growth in earnings power of LendingClub will become quite clear after we absorb the costs and accounting implications of operational integration. As a team we are very committed to executing on our strategy and building long-term value for our shareholders. Together with our core unsecured lending capabilities, our digital bank gives us a highly differentiated offering that positions us well to compete while providing cost-effective financial solutions for our customers. It is our intention to stay disciplined, execute and deliver in the near-term while investing for the future to achieve our broader ambitions and redefine banking for our customers.

Okay. With that, I will pass it over to you, Tom.

Tom Casey — Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Scott. As you just heard we are tremendously excited about the future with the addition of our new banking capabilities. I’ll spend my time going deeper into some of the areas that Scott touched on but will start off covering highlights from Q4 earnings. We’re very encouraged by our positive business trajectory in Q4. We increased originations to $912 million exceeding the high end of our guidance range and reflecting growth of 56% from the third quarter. We ended the year with $525 million of cash reflecting the sale of $470 million of loans in the second half of 2020 as we prepared to capitalize the bank with cash to support strong growth.

By maintaining such a high level of cash in the loans, we experienced a temporary and anticipated reduction in net interest income. For the fourth quarter the impact was about $20 million in revenue compared to 4Q 2019 and $8 million compared to the third quarter of 2020. Our results for the quarter also did not include onetime benefits related to loan sales and loan and asset reevaluations that occurred in the third quarter. So the story for the quarter is pretty straightforward. Transaction fees up 77% in Q3 on the back of 56% origination growth offset by lower net interest income reflecting prior loan sales and non-recurring asset revaluation benefits in Q3.

With that, let’s get into some of the financial benefits of our marketplace bank as Scott referenced and how this sets us up for 2021 and beyond. As seen on slide 11 in the LC Bank presentation, the economics of owning a bank are truly compelling with substantial and readily achievable benefits. With the vertically integrated digital platform we capture the best of the marketplace and the bank creating a self-sustaining high growth and highly profitable business with structural advantages. Let me outline some of these benefits. First, with access to banking capabilities we have significantly enhanced the resiliency of our business, enabling us to better serve our members. Deposits are much more stable compared to warehouse funding used by other fintech marketplaces.

Second, access to low cost deposits also reduces our borrowing costs dramatically allowing us to generate a new and growing stream of recurring earnings. This will help drive strong and sustainable profitability. Third, as a bank, we become vertically integrated reducing our dependency on others and eliminating the fees we paid to third-party issuing banks for originating the loans on our behalf. To put this into some perspective over the last two years, our partner banks received approximately $20 million per year for originating our loans. Fourth, we intend to hold prime loans comprising 15% to 25% of our total originations while selling the rest through the marketplace.

This leverages the unique capabilities of our platform and aligns our interest with investors. Together we can balance recurring and durable bank revenue stream with the capital light marketplace fee-based revenue stream. And fifth, our marketplace is fueled by diverse investor base that allows us to continue serving borrowers across the credit spectrum. This has enabled us to create a hugely efficient marketing engine while building a more inclusive brand that is aligned with our mission to empower members on their path to financial health. Now, let’s talk about how some of these benefits translate into enhanced financial performance. I’ll start with the positives. As you can see on slide 12 the benefits of deposit funding are very clear.

Compared to pre-pandemic levels our borrowing costs should decline by approximately 90%. Yes, 90%. In 2020 the average cost of warehouse lines was 3.3% compared to our bank’s deposit cost today of about 35 basis points. To put this into perspective, for every $1 billion in assets we hold we will now save approximately $30 million per year in interest expenses. As I mentioned earlier, the deposit funding is more stable than warehouse funding, which can dry up when market volatility increases. So there is less funding availability when you need it. Any deposits that are replacing these other funding vehicles is transformative to both the economics and the resiliency of our company and will enable us to drive a new stream of recurring revenue.

Our bank also has an award winning platform that brings $2 billion in deposits which will help support our future growth. In addition to lowering our funding costs of deposits, our new marketplace bank will capture significant financial benefits from being a bank and having a marketplace. As you can see on the right hand side of slide 14, for every $100 million in loans we originate we generate about $4 million through an origination and servicing fee when we sell the loans in the marketplace. The vast majority of this fee-based revenue is realized immediately and without requiring a significant amount of capital. However, it is highly dependent on origination volume. We can now bolster this revenue stream with bank revenue generated by loans held for investment on our balance sheet.

As you can see on the left side of the page, every $100 million of loans we hold on the balance sheet should generate additional marginal profitability of approximately $12 million. So when you compare that to the $4 million in the marketplace that’s three times more. And this is recurring revenue it’s not dependent on originations in any given quarter. However from the standpoint of GAAP profitability loans held for investment have accounting requirements such as CECL allowance for credit losses and the deferral of origination fees, which results in a loss at the time of origination. CECL provisions are less of an issue when loan balances are flat or growing at a low level. In contrast we expect to grow loans at a relatively rapid pace.

Therefore the cumulative layering of expected credit losses upfront will pressure short-term GAAP income. But as we continue to grow this portfolio we’ll establish an ongoing annuity of future earnings. So I want to underscore that even though GAAP accounting results in a front loading of expenses relative to revenue, the cash economics of retaining loans are very attractive. As growth normalizes and the impact of upfront expenses recognition becomes less pronounced GAAP and economic profitability loans held on the balance sheet will converge. The combination of revenue streams from the bank and the marketplace should enable us to grow faster and better navigate through challenging periods.

In addition to the power of the marketplace bank model, we benefit from being a leader in a very attractive asset class. Slide 15 shows that even after adjusting for credit losses LendingClub’s direct-to-consumer personal loans generate risk-adjusted margins of approximately 7.5%, representing more than two times the margin for traditional banks. So as we increase the proportion of consumer loans over time we’ll generate a highly profitable earnings stream at industry-leading margins. With that overview of the financial drivers of our new business model, let me provide some context and details behind our near-term outlook. I’d note our guidance excludes any potential impact from the SEC, which we hope to get resolved by the end of the year.

2020 was a year of repositioning as we navigated the pandemic, reduced our fixed costs by 30% and prepare for the acquisition of Radius. 2021 will be the year in which we prime the pump as we begin to build our consumer loan portfolio, integrate the bank and accelerate our origination growth. All this will set the company up to generate strong multi-year earnings growth. A reminder, with our new model there is no longer an immediate one-to-one connection between origination volumes and revenue. That’s because for loans we hold both origination fees and net interest income will be recognized over time rather than at origination. And you can see this dynamic play out as follows. For Q1, we expect originations to grow faster than revenues because of the deferral of origination fees.

We expect originations to grow 30% to 40% versus last quarter while revenues will be growing at 15% to 25%. However, when you look at the full year you see the opposite where revenues outpaced originations driven by growth of interest income. For the year, we expect origination growth of about 45% and revenue growth at 55%. You can see a similar dynamic of timing differences play out in our net income, which is impacted not only by the deferral of revenue and origination but also by the upfront CECL driven recording of charge-offs that occur over the life of the loans. Accordingly, we expect to report a GAAP net loss in 1Q ranging between $75 million and $85 million and for the year we expect a net loss of $175 million to $200 million.

Now note, this loss is almost entirely due to the change in accounting conventions for loans held at the bank due to adopting CECL accounting and origination fee deferrals. I want to note that it will also included a roughly $20 million of onetime costs related to the acquisition of Radius. Now these investments will prime the pump for recurring high margin earnings for years to come and we expect to earn more than two times the amount of the CECL provision over the life of the loan. Our outlook is consistent with the financial plan we submitted to the regulators for the bank acquisition. Overtime we anticipate that our GAAP earnings will drive industry-leading ROEs and catch up to our high growth cash earnings.

I also wanted to provide you with two additional details. We used approximately $140 million of our $525 million cash position for the purchase of Radius. We also capitalized the bank for an additional $250 million of cash bring the LC bank equity to approximately $440 million. Staying on the theme of capital, at the end of 2020, we had a valuation allowance of $211 million against our entire deferred tax asset. Over time as we generate GAAP earnings, we expect to reverse this valuation allowance which will substantially increase or tangible book value and generate substantial savings on cash taxes. So I know we went through a lot of information today and appreciate your interest in the company.

Before we get into questions, let me leave you with three key takeaways. First, we have a cycle tested and differentiated business model with data and technology advantages. Second, our unique business model allows us to leverage the benefits of both our capital light marketplace and our bank enable us to further disrupt the banking industry. And third, we are a leader in a large and growing market with substantial growth ahead. With about $440 million of capital and a business that will generate earnings to support future growth we are very excited about the road ahead and how well-positioned we are to create significant shareholder value.

Now let me open it up for questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

We will now begin the question-and-answer session. [Operator Instructions] Our first question today will come from Steven Kwok with KBW.

Steven Kwok — KBW — Analyst

Right. Thanks for taking my questions and congratulations on the closing of the Radius acquisition. I guess, the first question I have was just around pro forma tangible book value post the Radius acquisition. If you could provide an update of that? And then, you guys have given us highlights around the impact of the acquisition. Are those terms still the same around the beneficiaries and stuff as we think about it?

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Steven. Yes, let me the answer your first question and then just clarify your second one. So on the tangible book value at the bank, as I mentioned in my comments, it’s about $440 million, so we ended year — that’s going to be at end of the year we were — total equity would be less $750 million, so you still have — do you have additional capital at the parent. But inside the bank, we’ve got about $440 million of tangible book value.

The second question you had, Steven just if you can clarify that you mentioned something about the benefits?

Steven Kwok — KBW — Analyst

Yes at the time of the Radius acquisition you had given us in terms of what the time that’s were on the Radius Bank. Are those still largely impact from our funding, investments and bank economics?

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

Yes, they are, Steven. Overall, we continue to feel pretty very good about the acquisition. Things have changed a little bit, obviously rates are much, much lower than they were and Radius has delivered a lot more deposits than we original modeled. So clearly that’s a much bigger benefit, but we still get all the benefits that we talked about, as far as issuing bank fees and obviously the lower cost of funding that I mentioned in my prepared remarks are very significant. So and then obviously the interest income is quite larger than we expect again, because if we were in deposit cost right now. So very good about the acquisition and the profile that Radius has as we get started — integrated in this quarter.

Steven Kwok — KBW — Analyst

Got it. And if I, as you speak one last one in. Just around the GAAP consolidated net income, understanding that this year we have the one-time acquisition costs along with the seasonal impacting stuff, but when should we expect it on a GAAP basis, so you guys [Indecipherable] profitable as we continue this acquisition along with the loan growth?

Tom Casey — Chief Financial Officer

Yes. So, we haven’t give our long-term guidance, Steven, obviously lots of things to work through this year. We obviously just closed the transaction we gave — given you quite a bit of information on the new model and some of the key drivers of our profits and revenue. Just to highlight a couple of things to help you navigate, as we try to show you is that the deferral of the origination fee and the provision, obviously put pressure on our reported results. But I’d refer you back to Page 14, to show help that, the earnings recover, you can see that pretty significantly the — those two deferrals come back pretty quickly within the first nine months or so. So we’re not saying, when are — we’re are going to be GAAP profitable right, but I did say in my prepared remarks that most of the — with all of the GAAP loss this year is really the — of the CECL accounting provisions that require losses to be recognized upfront and the deferral of fees.

Just some quick math for you — if you were to take those two items that’s about $165 million of the loss right there, just those two items alone. And then you add the additional $20 million of integration-related expenses that — is right about the midpoint of our guide.

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

Yes, I’d just add. Tom. I mean, Steven, we’re — our goal here is to build a high growth, high profit machine that is driving really sustainable growth over a multi-year period, getting to GAAP profitability soon would actually be pretty straightforward based on the numbers Tom said, but we’re making a conscious decision to add the loans to our portfolio, because they’re going to drive — as you can see in the numbers, overall as an enterprise ever given dollar of loan origination we can drive 30% to 40% more in earnings than our historical model and this is really just a timing difference. So part of the timing of GAAP profitability is going to be based on our growth rate and our plan is to continue growing.

Steven Kwok — KBW — Analyst

Got it. Right, thanks for taking my question.

Operator

Our next question will come from John Rowan with Janney.

John Rowan — Janney Montgomery Scott — Analyst

Good afternoon, guys. Just to be clear, I think there’s a lot of talk about CECL. Is Radius — Radius has already adopted CECL correct? So there is not a one-day catch up on the allowance as you adjusted for higher lifetime losses, is that correct?

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

John. No, they were not subject to CECL, so they have — we’ve adopted CECLs part of the acquisition, I did leave that complexity out of my narrative. But yes, they will have a conversion amount, we’re working through the purchase accounting now, but there will be a conversion amount to establish a new provision that recognized in the first quarter, that’s included in my guidance.

John Rowan — Janney Montgomery Scott — Analyst

Okay. So the day one CECL adjustment to the allowance for Radius Bank is included in the GAAP loss figure for 1Q and for 2021, correct? Just to make sure I have this right.

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

That’s correct, and that’s one of the reasons why you see that loss so large in the first quarter, that’s part of it.

John Rowan — Janney Montgomery Scott — Analyst

How much — I mean, how much you bring up their allowance and why is the day one CECL adjustment here not just a charge to equity is it was on day 1 2020?

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So we didn’t own them on day 1 2020 and maybe not adopt CECL. So as part of the acquisition, since we had already adopted CECL in our own books, we adopt CECL for them to purchase accounting and that’s the piece, I was just referring to. So there was a day one charge is part of our purchase accounting, I’ll break that out for you, 1Q it is in our guidance though, we finalize the number — and for the past to finalize that number, but it’s all in my guidance.

John Rowan — Janney Montgomery Scott — Analyst

Okay and then just last question, you’ve guided us to how loans held through the bank were 3 times more profitable versus the traditional marketplace model? Has there been any change in the guidance that you provided that about 10% of the loans are going to be funded — 10% of LendingClub loans are going to be funded through Radius? Or is that — is there an update to that guidance figure?

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

Yes, I gave you in my prepared remarks that we’re targeting about 15% to 25% depending on the final volumes for the year. So we do that’s a good range to — again build the new recurring revenue stream that accelerates our earnings growth. But same time maintains a plenty of volume for our partners in the — on the investor side to buy our loans. So…

Tom Casey — Chief Financial Officer

Yes, I’ll make sure everybody is tracking, but when we take funding to Radius, what we’re referring to make sure that the answer to your question is, what percent of loans are we holding that’s 15% to 25%, 4% alone being sold through the marketplace that’s 75% to 85%.

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

That’s right.

John Rowan — Janney Montgomery Scott — Analyst

Okay, thank you.

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

Yes. Thanks, John.

Operator

And our next question comes from Henry Coffey with Wedbush.

Sameer Gokhale — Investor Relations

Henry, I think you might be on mute.

Operator

We’ll go ahead and go to our next question from Bill Ryan with Compass Point.

Bill Ryan — Compass Point — Analyst

Thanks, and good afternoon. A couple of questions, first off in the discussions with regulators and I know it’s probably baked into your guidance. But to-date, did they put limitations on if you will, sort of, the retention of loans going forward, because I know a lot of thinking back to some of the companies I follow that converted the banks, they were limited in the amount of growth on balance sheet that they could have, whether it was deposits or loans. So if you could talk about any possible restrictions?

And in the second thing on the CECL side of the equation, I had in my notes sort of 6% to 7% loss reserve upfront established on new originations. Is that still the right number? And when will, kind of, charge-offs follow behind it over what kind of time period? Thanks.

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

Yes. The first one on the restrictions, you know, all the information we provided you is what we’ve used for our regulatory approval. So these are the guidance we gave you reflects that. And obviously with any approval process there are business plans that we lay out. And so our profile that we’re showing you today is consistent with that. We don’t see any of the agreements we made with regulators, closing any concern on any of the things we laid out for you today. So we feel that this is a very, very good profile and the accelerated growth that I talked about is consistent with that.

With regard to CECL, your 6% to 7% is what I’ll call on a nominal basis sort of the 5%, I show you is on a discounted basis. And so the recognition of the actual charge-offs, you know, these have a duration typically on our three-year loans, about 1.5 years, so your peak losses is going to come in maybe in the 12-month time frame. But, you know, they will come in over the life of the loan as opposed to — as you know the CECL charged upfront.

Bill Ryan — Compass Point — Analyst

All right, and then…

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

So — go ahead.

Bill Ryan — Compass Point — Analyst

Just a question, you said the discount, so you approached or you’re taking the discounted valuation approach to CECL?

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

That’s, right. So it takes about a point half of it, Bill, so it’s — I showed you 5% on day one and then the numbers I showed you on Page 14 are net of any additional CECL increases over time, if any.

Bill Ryan — Compass Point — Analyst

Okay.

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Seeing no further questions. I would like to turn the callback over to Scott Sanborn for any closing remarks.

Scott Sanborn — Chief Executive Officer

Alright, well as I hope you could hear in our prepared remarks myself and the rest of the team are very excited to take this combined business forward. And we thank everybody for their patients. We know we were a little delayed in getting this out to you and look forward to talking to you maybe offline.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Most Popular

Conagra (CAG) bets on consumer psychology to drive future demand and growth

Conagra Brands Inc. (NYSE: CAG) reported strong results for the third quarter of 2021 which surpassed expectations. Net sales increased 8.5% to $2.8 billion helped by the increase in at-home

Carnival Corp. (CCL): Vaccine rollout and pent-up demand provide optimism for the cruise operator

Shares of Carnival Corp. (NYSE: CCL) were down over 2% on Thursday. The company reported first quarter 2021 earnings results a day ago which missed expectations. Despite seeing a drastic

It might not be the right time to invest in American Express. Here’s why

Widespread flight cancellations and restrictions on the hotel industry during the pandemic have had a ripple effect on credit card companies and payment service providers. After going through a rough

Add Comment
Loading...
Cancel
Viewing Highlight
Loading...
Highlight
Close
Top