Categories Earnings Call Transcripts, Health Care

Organigram Holdings Inc. (OGI) Q2 2022 Earnings Call Transcript

OGI Earnings Call - Final Transcript

Organigram Holdings Inc.  (NASDAQ: OGI) Q2 2022 earnings call dated Apr. 12, 2022

Corporate Participants:

Craig MacPhail — Group Director

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Derrick West — Chief Financial Officer

Analysts:

Aaron Grey — Alliance Global Partners — Analyst

Tamy Chen — BMO Capital Markets — Analyst

Matt Bottomley — Canaccord Genuity — Analyst

Douglas Miehm — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Ty Collin — Eight Capital — Analyst

Frederico Gomes — ATB Capital Markets — Analyst

Owen Bennett — Jefferies — Analyst

Aidan Giangregorio — Stifel GMP — Analyst

Michael Freeman — Raymond James — Analyst

Presentation:

Operator

Good morning, my name is Rob, and I’ll be your conference operator today. At this time, I would like to welcome everyone to the Organigram Holdings Second Quarter Fiscal 2022 Results Conference call. All lines have been placed on mute to prevent any background noise. After the speakers’ remarks, there will be a question-and-answer session. [Operator Instructions] Thank you. Craig MacPhail, you may begin your conference.

Craig MacPhail — Group Director

[Technical Issues] on today’s call should be aware that it will contain estimates and other forward-looking information in which the Company’s actual results could differ. Please review the cautionary language in today’s press release on various factors, assumptions and risks that could cause our actual results to differ.

Further reference will be made to certain IFRS measures during the call, including adjusted EBITDA and adjusted gross margin. These measures do not have any standardized meaning under IFRS, and our approach in calculating these measures may differ from that and other issuers. So these measures may not be directly comparable. Accordingly, these non-IFRS measures are intended to provide additional information and should not be considered in isolation or as a substitute for measures of performance prepared in accordance with IFRS. Please see today’s earnings report for more information about these measures.

Listeners should also be aware that we’re making certain statements relating to market share data, the company relies on reputable third-party data providers.

I would now like to introduce Beena Goldenberg, Chief Executive Officer of Organigram Holdings Inc. Please go ahead, Ms. Goldenberg.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, and good morning, everyone. With me is Derrick West, our Chief Financial Officer. For today’s call, we will discuss the financial results for the three months ended February 28th, 2022, and I will provide a general business update. We will then open the call for questions.

I’m happy to report that second quarter of fiscal 2022, we continued the progress of the past several quarters. We again achieved record net revenue in the quarter, the highest in the history of the Company. We grew our market share and now hold the number three position among Canadian LPs in the recreational market in Canada. And most importantly, we achieved a positive adjusted EBITDA of CAD1.6 million, two quarters earlier than we projected at the start of the year.

Also in the quarter, as we announced in our last call, we acquired Laurentian, an artisanal craft grower and premium hash producer based out of Quebec and net revenue in Q2 was CAD31.8 million, a 117% increase over Q2 of fiscal 2021. This is a record level of net revenue for Organigram and demonstrates our continuing success at understanding consumer needs, innovating to best address market demand and introducing compelling brands and products that resonate, and we continue to grow our market share in February.

We secured the number three position in market share among Canadian LPs for the second month in a row, with a share of 8.2% according to High Fire. In March, the momentum continued with another 20 basis point gain for a market share of 8.4%.

We also continue to hold the number one position in the flower category, which represents about half of the Canadian cannabis market. Our SHRED milled flower products are the top sellers in Canada with SHRED Tropic Thunder being the best selling flower product in the country. We also hold the number three position in the gummies category having doubled our market share quarter-over-quarter with two of our SKUs amongst the top 10 best sellers in the country. This market position include SHRED’ems gummies, which were introduced this past August, and Monjour, our large format CBD infused soft chews introduced this past November. Edison Jolts, our unique high potency THC lozenge maintains its best position as a best seller in the ingestible extract category.

Now moving on to innovation, we recognize the need to bring news to the category, so we continue to launch new products. We have leveraged our SHRED brand that has achieved high visibility among the cannabis consumer. In March, we shipped SHRED X kief-infused blends, an innovative product that combines the convenience and popularity of SHRED milled flower, with a potency of kief in a 50/50 ratio. We also launched SHRED X vape, these are 510 cartridge vapes, with the flavor profiles of SHRED milled flower products, Tropic Thunder, Megamelon and Funk Master. And how are we doing? Well, within days of launch SHRED X Tropic Thunder was the fourth best selling vape in Ontario.

Building on the success of SHRED’ems gummies, we added unique line extensions, SHRED’ems POP! gummies in the classic pop flavors of cola, root beer and cream soda were introduced in March. We’ve also added two new sour flavours, Sour Apple Slap and Sour Blue Razzberry, with 8 SKUs now available to consumers, we expect to strengthen our market position in the gummy category.

We’ve also added two new premium strength to our Edison lines, with Edison Kush Cakes and Edison Frozen Lemons. These high potency and terpene rich edition will create further engagement with cannabis enthusiast.

With Big Bag O’ Buds, our large format value brand, we added Pink Cookies, a high potency indica strain. This expansion of our product line addresses the desire for specific strains by value seeking consumers and reflects the evolution of the Canadian cannabis market.

International sales also bolstered our Q2 results. We shipped approximately 1,700 kilogram of dry flower to Israel and Australia in the quarter marking the highest international B2B shipments in the history of the Company. We expect to have further shipments to Canndoc in Israel and Cannatrek in Australia in fiscal 2022, and we’ll look to expand our international partners to ship more wholesale dry flower.

Now let’s look at operations, beginning with Laurentian. After acquiring Laurentian in December, we began working on integration. One of our priorities was to increase the distribution of its unique Tremblant hash and Laurentian craft flower products. At acquisition, Laurentian products were available in four provinces. By the end of the fiscal year, we will be available in all 10.

In Ontario, we’ve been successful at increasing distribution levels of Tremblant hash from 25% to almost 40% of Ontario’s 1,500 stores and have grown sales by 21%. This Ontario example underscores our success and leveraging our marketing, distribution and field sales capabilities to drive results. We expect to be able to achieve the same success across Canada, as we increase the footprint of Laurentian brands.

We are also making progress in expanding and automating production at Laurentian. Construction and licensing for the additional base is expected to be complete by the summer of 2022, with a four times increase in cultivation capacity and increased automation, processing and storage space to be achieved by the end of 2022.

Hash production at Laurentian is now supported by high quality and high potency kief coming from our Moncton facility. This was identified as an acquisition synergy. At our Moncton Campus, we are completing the Phase 4c expansion and expect to reach upwards of 80,000 kilograms of dried flower capacity. Environmental enhancements are currently in place, in approximately 40% of the facility and should be fully implemented by the end of the year. These upgrades have and will continue to further enhance yield and flower quality, as they are completed.

We currently have two automated pre-roll lines, and we’ll be adding high speed post-filling lines for SHRED and Big Bag O’ Buds by the end of fiscal 2022. In Winnipeg adding on to our highly automated gummy production lines, we have automated labeling and excise stamping and are commissioning pouch packaging equipment. We have also upgraded and leveraged our warehouse to optimize our logistics network and drive freight savings. These changes helped improve our efficiencies, margins and customer service. The build out and improvements in Moncton and Winnipeg reflects our strategy to make investments based on recognized business needs and strong payback.

In the quarter, all large scale construction projects were substantially completed at the product development, Center of Excellence in Moncton. The bio lab is being fully equipped in Q3, and then we will begin to conduct advanced plant science research. In the quarter, our joint R&D efforts continue to progress well, and we look forward to applying the discoveries and deep scientific knowledge to both strengthen our existing market products, as well as develop new consumer centric innovation.

T’s important to note that BAT support for the product development collaboration and Organigram as a whole was further showcased at the beginning of March when they invested CAD6.3 million into the Company. This investment was made through the exercise of their top-up rights pursuant to an Investor Rights Agreement and increase their equity position from 18.8% to 19.4%.

Also as mentioned in our call last quarter, in December, we increased our cumulative investment in Hyasynth’s biologicals by CAD2.5 million to CAD10 million for a strong minority position. Hyasynth’s advanced research into using biosynthesis to produce THC, CBD and rare cannabinoids without using cannabis plant provides us with another avenue to innovate in the future. Through these collaborations, and in addition to our in-house R&D capabilities, we will continue to produce unique exciting products for the Canadian consumers and subject to terms of the PDC create proprietary IP that we can introduce globally.

Now, I will turn it over to Derrick to present the financial overview. Derrick?

Derrick West — Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Beena. Turning to our earnings results for Q2 fiscal 2022, gross revenue grew 128% from Q2, 2021 to CAD43.9 million, net revenue grew a 117% from the same period in fiscal 2021to CAD31.8 million. These revenue increases were primarily due to higher recreational net revenue, which grew 108% from Q2 of fiscal 2021 and the completion of international shipments to Israel under our agreement with Canndoc and to Australia through Cannatrek.

While gross sales grew 128%, cost of sales decreased 20% year-over-year to CAD25 million. Lowering our total cost of sales during a growth period was as a direct result of increased efficiencies at our production facilities combined with improved inventory management.

We harvested approximately 10,000 kilos of flower during Q2 of fiscal ’22 compared to about 4,500 kilos in Q2 of fiscal 2021, an increase of 125%. Over the past year, the Company has experienced a growing demand for its products, and this led to increased planting and cultivation levels, which when combined with higher flower yields per plant and as compared to the prior year’s comparison quarter, this resulted in the doubling of our hubs [Phonetic]. Largely due to a higher net revenue, a reduction in inventory provisions, unabsorbed inventory cost and a lower cost of sales per unit, the gross margin in Q2 improved to CAD6.9 million from a negative CAD16.5 million in Q2 of 2021. On an adjusted basis, gross margin was CAD8.3 million compared to a negative CAD700,000 in Q2 of fiscal ’21.

We expect that we can continue to achieve efficiencies and better economies of scale from the three facilities lowering production costs. This combined with contributions from higher margin products will further improve margins.

SG&A, excluding non-cash share-based compensation increased to CAD14 million in Q2, 2022 from CAD10.3 million during the prior year’s comparison quarter. And this was largely due to higher employee costs, due to increased head count, including the acquisition of Laurentian, general wage increases, increased professional fees due to technology investment and higher trade investments in marketing spend initiatives.

In the quarter, we achieved positive adjusted EBITDA of CAD1.6 million, a CAD9.4 million improvement over negative CAD7.8 million in last year’s comparison quarter. This is the result of the continued improvements in our business, including higher sales volume, lower production cost, which generated higher gross margins and operating income.

We achieved positive adjusted EBITDA two quarters earlier than projected at the start of the year. Based on the momentum we see in terms of increased sales and improved efficiencies, we expect to generate positive adjusted EBITDA into the future.

Net loss for the quarter was CAD4 million compared to a net loss of CAD66 million in Q2 of fiscal 2021. This large reduction in the net loss was due to the increased sales and higher gross margins I’ve already mentioned.

In terms of our statements of cash flows, cash used in operating activities was less than CAD1 million during Q2 of fiscal 2022 compared to cash used of CAD10 million in Q2 of fiscal 2021. The year-over-year improvement is primarily due to current period’s operating income.

Cash provided by financing activities was CAD6 million during Q2, fiscal 2022 compared to CAD51 million cash used in the prior year’s quarter. During the current quarter, the Company received CAD6.3 million from proceeds from shares issued to BAT.

Cash used in investing activities was CAD23 million during Q2, fiscal 2022 compared to cash provided of CAD18 million in Q2 of fiscal ’21. The cash used in Q2 of this year reflects the CAD70 [Phonetic] million in cash consideration for the acquisition of Laurentian, CAD2.5 million for the additional investment in Hyasynth, CAD8.7 million for facility expansion and improvement, and CAD4.5 million invested into restricted cash to be used to fund the Center of Excellence.

In terms of our balance sheet, on February 28th, 2022, we had CAD151 million in unrestricted cash and short-term investments compared to CAD184 million at the end of fiscal 2021. The decrease during fiscal 2022 is primarily due to the Company’s investment in its working capital asset and capital expenditures for facility improvements, the purchase of Laurentian, and the additional investment in Hyasynth.

This concludes my comments. Thank you. I would like to turn the call back to Beena.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Derrick. The first half of fiscal 2022 has shown the success of our strategy to create exciting products and brands that are embraced by the market to maintain efficient operations and deploy capital wisely. This will continue to be our focus, which positions us for success for the rest of the year.

I’ll reiterate that our investors can continue to expect strong revenue and volume growth driven by expanded distribution, more new and exciting product and brand introductions, continued international sales, further improvements in our adjusted gross margin and continued positive adjusted EBITDA. Thank you for joining us today. I look forward to updating you on our progress.

And now, operator, you may open the call for questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Our first question comes from the line of Aaron Grey from Alliance Global Partners. Your line is open.

Aaron Grey — Alliance Global Partners — Analyst

Hi, good morning and congratulations on the quarter and reaching the EBITDA target two quarters ahead of what you originally expected. So first question for me, just on the EBITDA. So thinking about the EBITDA margin opportunities longer term, right, so now you’ve reflected [Phonetic] EBITDA profitability you expect that to continue going forward. Just how best do you think about the EBITDA margin opportunity maybe in the next 18 months to 24 months, as you expect continued improvement on the gross margin side and sales are ramping up. Thank you.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Derrick, over to you on that one.

Derrick West — Chief Financial Officer

Okay. We are confident that we’ll continue positive adjusted EBITDA based on the momentum over the past few quarters into the future with the increase to our capacity at all our facilities. This will result in economies of scale, which will lower our production costs, which will improve margins. There is also as well the additional contribution from Laurentian, which has a higher average price per unit just based on it being a premium product, and this as well contributes to a positive margin.

But bear in mind that as we need to continue to invest in our business to support the continued growth, and so while we expect to have a growing EBITDA, we’re not providing specific guidance at this time, in terms of a [Phonetic] percent of revenue, but we do expect, with all the momentum we have with increasing sales demand, increased capacity to have higher sales throughput with lower cost per unit that ultimately we’re well positioned to have increased EBITDA over time.

Aaron Grey — Alliance Global Partners — Analyst

Okay. Thank you so much for that color and detail. Second question for me on international, right, saw a nice sequential increase once again in the quarter, it looks like you’re expecting for continued momentum down that front. I just wanted to clarify, specifically in terms of the statements during the quarter, was there anything on the timing side, do you feel like those are going to be reoccurring, is this a good run rate on the go forward. And then just any color you could provide maybe on the margin, I know it’s a higher margin and we’ve had over this before, but the margin differential in terms of the international versus the domestic revenue? Thank you.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Right. So thank you for the question. So first of all, we do expect to see ongoing shipments to both Israel and Australia. We obviously turn the paperwork, import quotas, import documents, export documents and need to get those churned before every shipment. So that continues to be the regular cadence of our business. And we expect to see more shipments, obviously from the balance of this year.

In terms of your question on margin, I mean the real answer is, there is no excise tax on international, on any B2B sales and that’s the significant improvement in margin over just general recreational sales. It obviously comes with different kind of testing requirement. So there is a bit of offset to that, but it’s good margin business and nicely complements our recreational business.

Aaron Grey — Alliance Global Partners — Analyst

All right. Thanks very much and congrats on the quarter. I’ll jump back into the queue.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Tamy Chen from BMO Capital Markets. Your line is open.

Tamy Chen — BMO Capital Markets — Analyst

Great. Thank you. Good morning. First question I had is specifically on your rec sales, you described how you’re continuing to see momentum and your share, market share has continued to expand. So I’m just curious like why did your net rec revenues decline a little bit quarter-over-quarter.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

So we have a bit of timing — so overall, Tamy, our momentum is solid and we saw our market share grow again in March. We had a bit of a challenge during the month of January with Omicron, as it ran through our facility, and we had some high absenteeism that impacted our fulfillment. We got — we have the highest shipping month in February to get product out. But we had some sort of a little bit of timing issue that rolled into some solid momentum into the month of March. So that’s what you’re seeing on the rec side of the business. It’s — our market share continues to grow. So the offtake isn’t the problem. But we did have a little bit of timing issue through the quarter, as a result of that disruption.

Tamy Chen — BMO Capital Markets — Analyst

Okay. I understand. And then my follow-up question is, so if I look at the broader High Fire and even the StatCan [Phonetic] retail sales data for the industry, it seems to be slowing down or stalling a little bit the last several months really since the fall. And I noticed that you also produced bit less flower [Phonetic] I suppose that’s attributed to the Omicron aspect.

But I guess two part question here, with respect to what’s been happening in the market. First is, you called out for your fiscal Q3 that you’re expecting market growth in your outlook. So are you seeing now that the industry is growing again to new high. And second part of the question is based on where the market is today and what you expect over the near term, do you still believe that once you’re at the — think almost 80,000 [Phonetic] kilogram capacity the market can still more than absorb that from you? Thank you.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Perfect. So a couple of key questions there, Tamy. So first of all, we do see the market picking up. So it has been a little bit stalled over the last few months, as StatCan has reported. But given the opening of the communities and we expect to see — we expect to see concerts this summer and fares, and we expect to see the opening up generally of social activity, we do expect to see the market to rebound over the course of the next few months, especially expecting a nice big lift coming up at 4/20 [Phonetic]. So yes, we think that it will rebound over the summer, and we’ll start to see the benefit of those interactions.

I think we missed — some of the challenges we had even in the last few quarters were stalled. Quebec had this issue, where the PAT [Phonetic] required the vaccine passport to just get into the cannabis retail stores. So there was a little bit of a disruption from COVID over the last few months that has, that had stalled the category, but we expect with all the openings coming that we will see a rebound for sure. So that with regard to the market growth. And sorry, could you repeat your second part of the question.

Tamy Chen — BMO Capital Markets — Analyst

Yeah. Sure. I was just wondering, where you see it going the near-term profits [Phonetic], the medium term of the market, are you still confident that once you reach your full capacity at Moncton, the market can still more than absorb that from you? Thanks.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Right. Okay. Sorry. Yeah. So on that front, number one, we do see some continued growth. As I mentioned on our last call, our current situation is that demand is outstripping our supply. So we have our SHRED product is currently only being shipped to Ontario, Alberta, and we have some shipments going into Quebec. Not meeting those needs, so we have limited our distribution to other provinces, which is something that we will certainly expand once we have more capacity.

And then for now, we are a net buyer of product. We have to buy flower to meet the current demand. So we don’t have any concerns about using the capacity we have in our Moncton expansion, as we are already using product, buying product from external suppliers that we will buy from in-house once we have it up and running.

Tamy Chen — BMO Capital Markets — Analyst

Great. Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Matt Bottomley from Canaccord Genuity. Your line is open.

Matt Bottomley — Canaccord Genuity — Analyst

Good morning, congrats on the print this morning and thanks for taking these questions. Maybe just wanted to start maybe just at a higher level, when it comes to what’s happening in the Canadian market just sort of piggybacking off of what Tamy is talking about as well. Just the fact that if you look at some of the incumbents in the space that started with close to 20% market share on recreational implementation in Canada, it’s consistently been coming down, where I think the leader in the space now has maybe a little over 10% market share. So where do you see this bottoming out even though that Organigram has been doing very well and reaccelerating as of late. If you look at commoditized markets in this — the U.S. like Colorado, Oregon, market leaders there barely sort of eke out 5%. So I’m just curious where you think this is going in Canada, barring any sort of major change in excise tax or federal regulations in terms of the ability to secure outsized market share.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Right. Thank you, Matt. So first of all, I think that when you look at some of the bigger players, who had 20% market share, that dropped down to 10%, I think one of the things that we see when we look at their performance is that you can’t sit on your laurels, you can’t sit with the product that’s out in the marketplace and think it’s going to keep delivering the sales delivered last quarter or the quarter before, you have to keep innovating.

A lot of the focus of my comments this morning was around innovation. We know this is a category that needs to constantly be refreshed, bring new news, bring new innovation, excite the consumers. And I think that’s something that we focused a lot of our time on. We introduced 90 new products over the course of the last 12 months. We focus a lot on rationalizing taking our slower movers, bringing in new products, just to keep it fresh, and this is something that I think has helped our momentum continue over the course of time.

I think the question about what’s going to happen long term, it’s a highly fragmented market. We all know that there is a lot of small players that have less than 1% of market share and that amount of players has grown. However, we also know that the provincial boards are starting to tighten up. They don’t want to carry thousands of duplicate products, they want to manage how many items they have in their line up. And one example I could share is, as we took our Tremblant hash out to some of the new provinces to get it listed, the feedback we got was, they were excited that it was part of our portfolio because we’re already a supplier to them and they don’t have to set up another vendor. And so they were — they might not have taken the Tremblant hash from a unique vendor, but they were happy to have it in our portfolio.

And I think that’s the message that we have to recognize, as this market matures, the provinces are going to want to deal with less vendors and the vendors that are full suppliers of a cross portfolio are going to be that — prioritized, we’re going to have first access, we’re going to have better opportunity to get better distribution, get our listings in, and that’s going to help. So I do think that as it matures, you’re going to find some of those smaller players sort of drop-off, you are going to see a consolidation, but in the bigger players, the need to keep it fresh, keep bringing in new news is very important and that’s been our focus.

Matt Bottomley — Canaccord Genuity — Analyst

Great. Much appreciate it. And just one follow-up for me on the consolidation part. We’ve seen over the last several years, half dozen or more acquisitions for these types of craft growers, many of them have actually turned out quite favorably in terms of their penetration or market share being a little more sustainable when it comes to pricing. Is there any other product categories or SKUs or classifications you think are kind of next in line for the industry to consolidate or just sort of any other commentary on where you think M&A is going in the domestic element of Canada.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Right. So first of all, I think we’ve seen different types of M&A over the last few years. So there has been the big players, who’ve acquired other big players and as a result, had a lot of duplication in offerings and drove some obviously synergies, but some rationalization of brands as well.

Whereas one of the things that we focus on our M&A strategy has been looking at our portfolio and seeing, where there is [Phonetic] gaps in our portfolio and really looking to find acquisitions that could fill those gaps. So the example, when we acquired EIC, Edibles and Infusions Corporation last April, we work in the gummies space, right. We acquired it in April. It was pre-revenue. By August, we launched the new gummies into the marketplace. We’re now — we’re now the number three gummy player right within six months from when we launched into the market.

So we found that we recognized with our Laurentian acquisition that we needed a craft flower provider, we did rework in concentrates and concentrates with a growing segment, and we wanted to bolster our presence in the Quebec marketplace. And that’s working really well for us, not only do we get the benefit of the higher margin products that Laurentian has provided, but we strengthened our relationship with the SQDC in Quebec, and we’re seeing that reflected in the growth of our core Organigram SKUs, not just the Tremblant SKUs.

So we’ve been very focused at looking at the portfolio and figuring out where we have to go that meet it. So it is accretive and incremental, as opposed to just chasing market share that ends up with duplication might result in some rationalization. So that’s sort of our approach.

In terms of your thoughts, where it’s going to go? Look there is — there’s a lot of players in flower, and there is — flower is a big part of the category, but how do you differentiate over time is going to be important. And I think the — some of the fragmentation in the flower spaces, people want news, but the bigger players keep bringing new strains, new news, and you don’t need to have a separate LP come out and setup for a one-time offer in and out.

We are really focused on our quality of our flower growing it, improving both our terpenes and our THC and developing high quality product for our Edison brands and bringing some new strains out in the marketplace, so the retailers don’t feel they need to chase those craft or specialty producers. And of course, we have our Laurentian craft flower as well. So that’s how we see it and hopefully can — could keep growing and driving our market share, as a result of that M&A approach.

Matt Bottomley — Canaccord Genuity — Analyst

Yeah. Great. I appreciate all the color.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Douglas Miehm from RBC Capital Markets. Your line is open.

Douglas Miehm — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Thanks very much. My first question really has to do with your strategic thinking being as it relates to pricing in the marketplace, it seems you’ve done an excellent job, from that perspective. But do you think some of the pricing declines in the marketplace that we’ve seen over the last 12 months are over, are we had a base or could we see some further erosion in overall pricing in the Canadian marketplace.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Right. Doug, so here’s — and I think I talked about this last quarter, I think a lot of the price compression that we saw in flower has happened. I think we got to a point, where flower pricing on the value segment is actually at or even slightly below what the illicit market is at. And so I think that pressure on flower is mostly behind us. We’ve also seen with less supply in the market in Canada, we’ve had some grow cultivation sites that have been shuttered. We’ve got a bit more balance between supply and demand that was pushing some of that price compression as well.

So the flower piece, I think is mostly behind us. There is more compression that we’ll expect to see. We see it in vapes. We see it in concentrates. And I think the important thing is that for us recognizing that we don’t shy away from the value segment. We think it’s an important segment. It’s a high volume segment. If you could make margin in the value segment, and then build some more premium offerings in terms of your mix, you’ve got it made [Phonetic], you can continue to drive your positive EBITDA.

So I think that there could be other compression in some of those other segments. Until they reach that point, where they’re lining up to what the illicit market was offering that, that’s the pressure point. And once people could buy the product through retail stores, legal retail stores, and yet, at the same price and really if you look at some of the research results more better quality product like why would that’s where it will settle down. So hopefully that provides the color you’re looking for.

Douglas Miehm — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Yeah. No. Very helpful. As a follow-up, what we’re finding and I don’t think this is a surprise, but the bud tenders play a key role in — and focusing on what type of product people should buy. And what do you think — and the parent preference for the smaller guy as well relative to larger LPs, so they do support the craft growers probably to a more significant extent than the larger players. What’s your thinking on that. I know that you’ll probably describe your strains in your innovation, but is there anything else that you can add as well?

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

So listen, I think you’re right, bud tenders do play a very important role because consumers — there are consumers that come into those retail stores and they’re asking questions and want some guidance on what to buy. I think one of the things that we pride ourself at Organigram is we have our own dedicated sales force. We have feet on the street across the country. We spend a lot of time engaging with bud tenders not only sharing with them what our products are, strains are, but we do education programs with them. We run, we go in, and we setup in-store activation. And so we have relationships in-store and we promote the breadth of our portfolio.

And so if there is a bud tender that’s focused on craft or more premium flowers, we’ll focus a lot of our attention on our Edison brands or bringing our Laurentian craft flower now, you’ve got some bud tenders that are really looking for the innovative products. So when we introduce something like our SHRED X kief-infused blends, we’re introducing something new and exciting that’s high potency. Really great feedback on our Tremblant hash, as we’ve taken the education about hashes out to the marketplace, how it’s used and done a lot of education with the bud tenders.

And then on our gummies, look, we came into the market with products that were at a price point that was more accessible to a lot of consumers, and we got a lot of positive feedback from the bud tenders that now people could buy four gummies for under CAD5, as opposed to the CAD8 that was being charged before and so a significant benefit. So I think there is — it’s not all about price, it’s about price and value and uniqueness and offering, and all those factor into what a bud tender might recommend to a consumer. So we spend a lot of time with that connection with bud tenders talking about our portfolio, and we feel that they often recommend our products. So it’s not just the little guys that they recommend, they are recommending quality products, and we feel we have a really good portfolio.

Douglas Miehm — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Excellent. Thank you very much.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Ty Collin from Eight Capital. Your line is open.

Ty Collin — Eight Capital — Analyst

Hi, thanks for taking my question and congrats on the really solid improvement in gross margin this quarter. Could you help us unpack the key moving pieces there in terms of what drove that gross margin improvement, just how much of that was due to Laurentian, how much from the larger international shipments, how much from product mix, for example, appreciate any color you could provide there? Thanks.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Okay. Perfect. Thanks, Ty. Derrick, I’ll pass that over to you.

Derrick West — Chief Financial Officer

Perfect. I would say you outlined a couple of the points that, that were key in terms of improving the margin, but it was a little bit of everything in terms of product mix. No question there was more with the international shipment, which has been a outlined earlier without the excise tax. It has a much higher margins than most rec flower does. That was helpful. There generally, we have an increase, as well as the contribution from Laurentian, which as a crop to grow and with the hash product does attract higher margins in that business, and there was a contribution there that did assist the quarter.

But I think the other element that’s really key is just with overall continued sales growth over the last few quarters and with higher levels of production, we’re just starting to achieve economies of scale and getting a lower cost of production on an overall basis, which is helping the margin in all our product categories. And we expect that lift to continue, as we look forward, given that we harvested 10,000 kilos in the quarter, that’s an annualized rate of 40,000.

We do believe we’ll end [Phonetic] the fiscal year at 80,000 and that we have the capacity to sell that product on, as part of flow through, and where just a large component of costs are fixed in nature, just by operating at these higher levels. We do over time get a lower cost per unit, and this has just provided a general lift for the Company in the quarter, and as was partially seen last quarter as well. And we expect this to continue.

Ty Collin — Eight Capital — Analyst

Great. Thanks for that. And then just for my follow-up a bit more of a market level question. Given some of the pressures on consumers’ pocketbooks here between inflation and rising borrowing costs, are you seeing customers starting to trade down into value categories at all. And is that a risk to your plan to kind of emphasize more premium SKUs in your sales mix?

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. So first of all, I think our sales mix, well — we have a lot of value products, and I think that we don’t shy away from them. We could make margin on our value products as well as our premium. You have to be able to meet different consumers’ are driven by different sensitivities. And obviously, there is a big consumer group that are looking for the lower priced products still high quality, but lower priced, but there are the cannabis enthusiast and sort of craft seekers that want the higher quality products. So we want to make sure we’re offering the different products to different consumers what they are looking for.

In terms of pressures to the pocketbook, there is no question. We all know that cost of living has gone up. I think what we saw over the course of COVID was that people were buying into the cannabis market to address stress, to address relaxation, it wasn’t all about partying and discretionary, it became more of something to help them get through some of the challenges.

And look well, I would like to admit that we’re excited about more of the recreational time over the summer, the pressure on inflation and cost increases is out there, and we think that our products offer consumers an opportunity to address those stresses and feel good about their day, right. So it’s a little bit of a help and a little bit — and it’s an important addition to I think their lifestyle. So I don’t really expect there will be a very big impact other than perhaps more of a shift to the more value products, and that will of course, benefit us. We’re happy to be a value supplier along with the premium supplier.

Ty Collin — Eight Capital — Analyst

Great. Thanks, Beena. Thanks, Derrick.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Frederico Gomes from ATB Capital Markets. Your line is open.

Frederico Gomes — ATB Capital Markets — Analyst

Hi, good morning. Thanks for taking my questions. Just on your gross margin, you guys are showing some good growth there, good extension. Can you talk about the differences in margins between your rec sales in Canada and your international sales, and how much of that margin expansion is coming from a mix with higher international? Thank you.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Derrick.

Derrick West — Chief Financial Officer

I’ll take that. Yes. Well, I guess, our international revenues were CAD4.4 million in Q2, which is a one of the highest that we’ve had as a total and as a percent to our total revenue, as a Company. As noted, we don’t have the excise on it. It does attract a much higher margin than our rec business despite our margins also improving in our rec business as well. We’ve been lowering the cost of production at the facility and this is helpful for all our product categories including pre-rolls as well.

So we don’t [Indecipherable] disclose, I guess, our margin by distribution channel. And so it’s a difficult question to answer in the sense that we just don’t provide that specific guidance. But we do as the international shipments are important part of our business, we do have a cadence of ensuring that we try to have a quarterly shipment, and we’ll expect to continue to do so. But the both businesses are growing, and we expect to have more flower available at the end of the year to supply both these markets. And when we do, so it will be at a lower cost per unit, just from economies of scale. But in terms of getting granular on what is the margin by distribution channel, it’s just guides we haven’t historically provided or published. So apologies, it’s not the clearest answer to the question, but it’s just not guidance we provide.

Frederico Gomes — ATB Capital Markets — Analyst

Yeah. No. Sure I understand that. Thank you. And then when you look at your market share and your growth outlook through the remainder of this year, which product categories do you expect you’d gain most market share in? We know that you are a leader in flower, but do you expect to gain a lot of share in edibles, vapes or continue to gain share in flower? So any color on specific product categories. Thank you.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Right. So thanks, Fred. I think — listen, we just launched a bunch of new products. We’re very excited about our SHRED X vape. It’s a known fact that we are very underdeveloped in this segment, and we have a great brand in SHRED with both [Phonetic] flavors, and we could reproduce those flavors in our vape offerings. Initial offtake, we have shipped to New Brunswick sold out very quickly on our initial shipments. So we do expect to see some growth coming from our vape launch.

As I mentioned in my point earlier, we have a bunch of new innovation coming into the gummy space, really on our SHRED’ems, building out that line up from 3 SKUs to 8 provides us bigger presence. We expect to continue to drive our market share on the gummies segment and are seeing great results in certain retailers, where we’re already the number one gummy supplier. So that certainly is a goal of ours to continue to drive the growth in the gummy space.

With regard to concentrates, remember, we only had basically two months of Laurentian in our Q2 results, so we do expect to see, not only an increase based on having the full quarter, but obviously, as I mentioned, we’re expanding our distribution. We’ve started to ship to some of the Atlantic provinces already. We have shipments expected to go out to BC. So that expanded distribution on concentrates on top of the extra volume just from a full quarter should help us really increase our market share on the concentrates section as well.

So we’re very — I would say that while flower is obviously very important, we’re number one in flower, and we’ll keep driving to fulfill flower requirements. Where we see our biggest market share gains are going to be from some of those 2.0 categories that we believe could strengthen our full breadth of portfolio, but will also improve our margins. They tend to be higher-margin segments as well.

Frederico Gomes — ATB Capital Markets — Analyst

Thank you. That’s really helpful. Congrats for the quarter again. I’ll get back to queue.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Owen Bennett from Jefferies. Your line is open.

Owen Bennett — Jefferies — Analyst

Good morning, guys. Hope all well. And first question, I just wanted to come back to the sales mix obviously, really impressive market share traction, but does appear to be driven the value, and we’ve SHRED, and a lot of the new launches are also with SHRED. So I’m just wondering, could you give maybe a bit more color on your actual sales mix currently between value and premium. And then what you’re doing exactly to address the top end of the market? Obviously, you’ve got Laurentian, you’ve got edison, but interested in how you see that sales mix evolving going forward or how you’d like to see it evolve in an ideal world? Thank you.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Right. So — thank you. Let me say that — so our flower sales, if I look at the mix over time, if I go back to fourth quarter of ’21, we had about 68% of our business was our flower and 18% were our blends, which was our SHRED. If you fast forward to this quarter, the flower went from 68% to 58% and blends held roughly the same from 18% to 19%. So these are percent of our total revenue.

So I guess the message is, we’re holding our position in flower by continuing to innovate and bring new strains and meet the consumer needs, but the focus on our growth has really been in expanding some of those other areas, right? I mean edibles, obviously new to us in our fourth quarter at 3%, now represents 9% of our business in Q2. Concentrates, which we didn’t have, now represents 5%. And I forgot to mention earlier, we have the number one SKU in the ingestible extract category with our Jolts, the high lozenge — high potency lozenge that we have out in the marketplace. And it really is, it’s unique, it’s differentiated, patent pending, and it continues to grow. There’s a lot of interest in that product, and we’ve just introduced a couple new flavors into the marketplace. So the mix is changing by adding 2.0 products, while continuing to make sure we have news and unique offerings in our flower and in our blends.

Owen Bennett — Jefferies — Analyst

Okay. Thanks. And then just the next question is, I mean, how are you trending currently with the available capacity? And then, when will construction on Moncton be completed? And then just linked to that, how much of a boost do you think the gross margins would you foresee when Moncton is complete and running at full scale? Thank you.

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Right. So I’ll start and then I’ll pass it over to Derrick to answer the question on the gross margins. So currently, we’re running at capacity. So we are basically, as I mentioned earlier, our demand is outstripping our supply. As soon as product comes off the line, gets through our testing and our packaging, we’re shipping it out the door.

So what’s ending up in the marketplace is fresh, high-quality flower, and we are — we don’t have any spare capacity. So we are currently buying from external customers, making sure, obviously, the quality meets our specification and look forward to when we’ll be able to supply our own product, as the expansion comes online.

So your question of when do we expect that? We expect to be planting in the 4C expansion by the end of Q3, and we expect to be harvesting flower out of that — out of those new rooms [Phonetic] in Q4 of this year. So we’re well on our way, very excited about getting the extra capacity. As I said beyond, there is opportunity to expand our distribution of SHRED into some other markets, which we haven’t been able to do. And we have — we’ll explore further opportunities, as we have the capacity to provide it. So we’ve been somewhat restricted, and we look forward to having that extra capacity.

Derrick, over to you on the margins.

Derrick West — Chief Financial Officer

Yeah. I think when comparing Q2 of this year to Q2 of last year, it sort of demonstrates the impact to the financials just on changing production levels. In Q2 of 2021, we were harvesting approximately 4,000 kilos in the quarter, and we ended up reporting in that quarter a negative adjusted gross margin, so a negative 5%. And just by moving up to our current capacity, which was in around the 40,000 to 45,000 level prior to completing construction, along with other process improvements and initiatives at the facility, we’ve taken that negative adjusted gross margin and at this point [Phonetic] for Q2, we have a 26% adjusted gross margin, a 31% swing.

Now I’m not indicating that I’m expecting a similar growth to margin in terms of extra 31% being added on, as we go forward to capacity, but it is only to indicate the level of volatility that margin has as a direct consequence of the cost of production and by doubling our — effectively doubling the Alberta [Phonetic] facility at the end of — as we go into the early parts of next year from where we are today, we’ll provide a significant uplift to a reduction of cost is significant enough that will make a meaningful difference to our adjusted gross margin in those future periods. But I’m not going to provide specific guidance on it.

But the lift that we’ve had to-date is really we haven’t increased capacity yet. We’ve just increased our planning and have done other improvements at the facility on whether it’s labor management or other packaging review on materials, etc, that have allowed us to achieve an improved margin. So we just think that by getting to this higher level of scale, and ultimately, there’s a great opportunity for us to continue to see positive improvements to the adjusted margin that we’re otherwise reporting on them.

Owen Bennett — Jefferies — Analyst

Great. Thank you. Very helpful.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Andrew Partheniou from Stifel GMP. Your line is open.

Aidan Giangregorio — Stifel GMP — Analyst

Good morning. Thanks for taking my question. This is Aidan Giangregorio speaking on behalf of Andrew. Just curious, diving into Quebec a little bit more. Could you provide any additional color on how the sales of your products are doing specifically in the Quebec market and what’s working well there?

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Right. So I think I would say to you that our product is in Quebec is performing probably sort of flat lining a little bit based on what we acquired, as it required a little bit of refresh the product was in the market for a while. And the thing that we’ve seen over and over again is you need to have sort of new news. And we have — we’ve been working on great new innovation and upgrades that we can bring into the Quebec marketplace to make sure it continues to be a fresh offering there. But taking what is a tremendous product that was available in the Quebec market for the last year and rolling it out to some of the other markets, where it’s new and seeing great results, as a result of that.

So I think one of the things we’re doing is getting the right offering into Ontario market. We have — we’ve been converting from a 24-pack down to a 12-pack to make sure that the independent trade in Ontario will pick it up, not too big a range for them to bring it in. And we’re spending a lot of time educating the bud tenders on that product. So we’re really excited about what the Tremblant hash could do for us. But in terms of Quebec specifically, we’re on to some innovation, some exciting innovations that we’re — want to bring into the Quebec market to just keep it fresh and make sure that we maintain the momentum and some of the reasons why we bought the business.

I will say, as I mentioned earlier, that not only is — the acquisition was not only to get the Tremblant Laurentian brand in Quebec, but it was also to strengthen our relationship with SQDC, and we have seen a significant increase in our base organic brand business in Quebec, as a result of building that relationship.

Aidan Giangregorio — Stifel GMP — Analyst

Okay. Great. Thank you for the additional color and I’ll step back in the queue.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Michael Freeman from Raymond James. Your line is open. Hi, Beena, hi, Derrick, thanks, and thanks for taking our questions, and congratulations on this booming quarter. I would like to ask some questions about the BAT PDC research alliance. And I wonder if you could provide any color on focuses of this research alliance? You described sort of the R&D facilities being substantially completed now. But I guess, if you could describe the activity of those teams, they’ll be working on those innovation products, how perhaps Hyasynth’s cultured cannabinoid innovations might be folded into those activities? And how — and you previously described sort of an IP-driven entry or at least approach to international and specifically U.S. markets. I wonder if you could provide some color on these things?

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

So — certainly. So first of all, with regard to the product development collaboration, as we’ve mentioned before, the focus is predominantly in CBD, which is the area that we’re doing most of the really scientific research. The focus is looking at improving efficacy, onset, just the delivery mechanisms. There’s — it’s a lot of fundamental research that starts with that we could then leverage, as we launch new products to bring into our portfolio. So the teams at the product development center, and our internal R&D work together.

So as we learn more about the product, we learn how to improve the offerings that we have in our portfolio through our own R&D. So that’s an exciting development that’s happening already. As I mentioned, we’re just completing the bio lab, and so what that means is more advanced scientific research on the plants, plant genetics is going to happen as we move forward. So that’s the — that’s what’s happening in our PDC.

In terms of Hyasynth, at this point, they’re not connected, but for us, the whole focus is around innovation, and we see there’s an opportunity that, at some point, we’ll look at API that potentially is higher purity, that comes out of biosynthesis that isn’t from cannabis plants that might be more appropriate for certain markets. So we wanted to make sure that we have that opportunity to be connected in the biosynthesis space as well.

And in terms of longer-term IP, we know that moving flower across borders is difficult, but if we develop IP that really becomes the opportunity to take into new markets. So it’s something that we continue to work on together with our partners.

Michael Freeman — Raymond James — Analyst

That’s perfect. Very helpful. Thanks. And quickly on the 4C expansion, you mentioned that planting is going to be happening there by the end of third quarter, harvesting in fourth quarter. But wondering how you would describe the time lines between cultivation ramp from around 50,000 kilogram run rate capacity sort of today to full capacity with 4C included of around 80,000 kilograms a year. How would you describe the time line of that ramp?

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Derrick, do you want to grab that one?

Derrick West — Chief Financial Officer

Yes. I can. I would indicate that right now, we’re approximately at 45,000. We would leave August around 80,000 kilos a year in terms of the annualized rate. And I think that the ramp is pretty heavy right now to July and August in terms of when that, that comes up. Just as a consequence of that, you have to sort of complete the construction, while we’re not planning in all rooms [Phonetic] at the same time. It’s going to be staggered just in terms of labor management and taking into consideration the construction work. But it would be really starting to ramp up heavily into the July and August period and going from, say, 45,000 annualized kilos to the 80,000 annualized kilos.

Michael Freeman — Raymond James — Analyst

All right. And Derrick, a very quick follow-up on that, like I understand that escalating cultivation will — should improve margins based on the economies of scale. But do you — might we expect a margin blip, as you undergo this aggressive ramp in cultivation and planting out?

Derrick West — Chief Financial Officer

I’m not sure, it would be a cost — believe it would be more or less, there’s a delay in terms of like when you’re harvesting and the cost that you have on it to when it hits your income statement because you almost have that one month delay during [Phonetic] the products sold. So ultimately, in terms of all of the rooms churning, you’re talking about the end of August and that really starts to impact the cost of the inventory that’s expensed during Q1 of next year.

And — but I think there will be — with some of the rooms coming on during — some of the harvest coming on from the new rooms in June, July, that there will be some economies of scale, and therefore, lower cost that will benefit the Q4 margin, but that the real improvement comes after sometime, I said [Phonetic] on operating at that higher level, which, again, we think we’re leaving fiscal 2022 with the full capacity room harvest.

Michael Freeman — Raymond James — Analyst

All right. Thank you very much.

Operator

There are no further —

Beena Goldenberg — Chief Executive Officer

Thank you. I know we’ve run a little bit over our time. So I want to thank everyone for joining us today. We’re very excited about the momentum on our business, and we look forward to updating you on our progress. I will wish everybody a happy 4/20 [Phonetic] for next week. And with that, I’d like to end the call.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

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