Categories Earnings Call Transcripts, Industrials

PPG Industries Inc (PPG) Q2 2021 Earnings Call Transcript

PPG Earnings Call - Final Transcript

PPG Industries Inc  (NYSE: PPG) Q2 2021 earnings call dated Jul. 20, 2021.

Corporate Participants:

John A. BrunoVice President of Investor Relations

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

 

Analysts:

John P. McNultyBMO Capital Markets — Analyst


Ghansham Panjabi — Robert W. Baird — Analyst

David BegleiterDeutsche Bank — Analyst

John RobertsUBS — Analyst

Stephen ByrneBank of America Securities — Analyst

Michael SisonWells Fargo — Analyst

Jeff ZekauskasJPMorgan — Analyst

Prashant JuvekarCiti — Analyst

Frank MitschFermium Research — Analyst

Laurent FavreExane BNP Paribas — Analyst

Vincent AndrewsMorgan Stanley — Analyst

Kevin McCarthyVertical Research Partners — Analyst

Arun ViswanathanRBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Duffy FischerBarclays — Analyst

Bob KoortGoldman Sachs — Analyst

Mike HarrisonSeaport Research Partners — Analyst

Jaideep PandyaOnfield Investment Research — Analyst

Edlain RodriguezJefferies — Analyst

Presentation:

Operator

Good morning. My name is Jason, and I will be your conference operator today. At this time, I would like to welcome everyone to the PPG Second Quarter 2021 Earnings Conference Call. [Operator Instructions] After the speakers’ remarks, there will be a question-and-answer session. [Operator Instructions] Thank you.

I would now like to turn the conference over to John Bruno, Vice President of Investor Relations. You may begin your conference.

John A. BrunoVice President of Investor Relations

Thank you, Jason, and good morning everyone. Once again, this is John Bruno. We appreciate your continued interest in PPG and welcome you to our second quarter 2021 financial results conference call. Joining me on the call from PPG are: Michael McGarry, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer; and Vincent Morales, Senior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer.

Our comments relate to the financial information released after US equity markets closed on Monday, July 19th, 2021. We have posted detailed commentary and accompanying presentation slides on the Investor Center of our website, ppg.com. The slides are also available on the webcast site for this call and provide additional support to the brief opening comments Michael will make shortly. Following management’s perspective on the company’s results for the quarter, we will move to a Q&A session.

Both the prepared commentary and discussion during the call may contain forward-looking statements, reflecting the company’s current view of future events and their potential effect on PPG’s operating and financial performance. These statements involve uncertainties and risks, which may cause actual results to differ. The company is under no obligation to provide subsequent updates to these forward-looking statements.

This presentation also contains certain non-GAAP financial measures. The company has provided in the appendix of the presentation materials, which are available on our website, reconciliations of these non-GAAP financial measures to the most directly comparable GAAP financial measures. For additional information, please refer to PPG’s filings with the SEC.

Now, let me introduce PPG Chairman and CEO, Michael McGarry.

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, John, and good morning everyone. I would like to welcome everyone to our second quarter 2021 earnings call. Most importantly, I hope you and your loved ones are remaining safe and healthy.

Now let me provide some comments to supplement the detailed financial results we released last evening. For the second quarter, our net sales were a record and nearly $4.4 billion and our adjusted earnings per diluted share from continuing operations were $1.94. Our adjusted EPS were significantly higher than the second quarter of 2020, partially due to last year’s second quarter, including various pandemic related impacts.

Looking back to pre-pandemic results. Our adjusted EPS was similar to the second quarter of 2019, despite sales volumes being 6% lower than that period and we are dealing with historical high levels of raw material inflation in the current period [Phonetic]. Our strong year-over-year sales reflect a partial recovery from the unfavorable pandemic effects of last year, but also include better than market performance across many of our businesses for this quarter. We achieved these higher sales levels, despite significant supply and component disruptions; including ones that reduce the overall manufacturing capability of our customers.

Coming in the quarter, we expected these disruptions would have an estimated impact of $70 million to $90 million. However, the actual impact was much more severe and closer to $200 million. Our adjusted EPS in the second quarter, while near all-time record levels was below our April forecast. Three main factors impacted the difference: due to supply disruptions we experienced unprecedented levels of raw material and transportation costs that continually elevated as the quarter progressed. This drove raw material inflation to be up a mid-to-high teen percentage on a year-over-year basis versus our original estimate of a high single-digit percentage increase.

Our automotive OEM business was impacted most significantly from supply disruptions as we estimate that more than 2 million less cars were built than initially expected during the quarter. This impacted our sales by about $100 million or higher than $40 million more than we expected in April. Finally, as we expected the supply disruptions led to shortages of certain raw materials with anticipated impact of $30 million to $50 million, but the actual impact was closer to $100 million. We are highly confident that the sales related to these production disruptions will be deferred to later quarters and this will elongate the global automotive OEM recovery.

As I mentioned in April coming into the year, we are expecting an inflationary environment and had prioritize selling price increases across all our businesses. This helped us achieve solid price increases year-to-date and our pace of price realization is well ahead of the most recent raw material inflation cycle in 2017 and 2018. Clearly, this inflation cycle is much higher than anyone anticipated and we are continuing on a business-by-business basis, working to secure further selling price increases. This includes executing additional pricing actions during the third quarter. As a reminder, the second quarter of 2021 was our 17th consecutive quarter of higher selling prices.

We’re also continuing our strong cost management evidenced by our SG&A as a percentage of sales being 130 basis points lower than the second quarter of 2019. This is being supported by our ongoing execution on our structural cost savings programs, realized an incremental $40 million of savings in the second quarter. We have increased our targeted full-year 2021 savings by about 10% to $135 million.

In the second quarter, we finalized three acquisitions: Tikkurila, Worwag and Cetelon. We funded the acquisition through a combination of cash and external financing, which came in at a very attractive borrowing rate. We had yet another strong operating cash performance during the quarter and ended the quarter with about $1.3 billion of cash and cash equivalents, given us continued flexibility to do additional accretive cash deployment in the upcoming quarters.

In regards to our other two recently completed acquisitions, our new Traffic Solutions business, which is comprised of the Ennis-Flint acquisition performed to our expectations in the quarter, despite significant challenges with raw material availability and its order book is at historical highs entering the third quarter. Our VersaFlex acquisition was smaller is performing well and it’s already helped us win significant protective coatings project in Central America, due to the advantaged technologies that we acquired.

Another notable accomplishment during the second quarter was the appointment of our company’s first ever Vice President of Global Sustainability. PPG has been a clear ESG leader in the coatings industry for our market-leading sustainable products and we have plans to further improve our overall ESG program. We will provide updates on these initiatives in subsequent quarters.

Moving to our current outlook most important is that we’re continuing to see very robust and broad-based demand globally, including in many industrial and OEM end-used markets and strong architectural coatings trade activity in the US. Many of our customers have indicated that their order books were at high levels exiting the second quarter. We anticipate the strong global demand pattern to continue. In addition, we expect an eventual restocking of inventory to occur in many of our selling channels, either later this year or in 2022.

In the near-term, we expect some of our customers will continue to be challenged with input or component shortages. So their production capabilities and schedules likely to remain choppy throughout the third quarter. PPG is also experienced in the continuation of spot outages of direct coatings raw materials. As a result, we expect some unfavorable sales impacts from both our direct supply chain disruptions and the production curtailment of some of our customers in the third quarter. Our current best estimate is our sales are expected to be unfavorably impacted by about $150 million in the third quarter, due to these issues. We expect these sales will be largely deferred to subsequent quarters.

We also expect raw material costs to remain at elevated levels in the third quarter, our current best estimate is that they will be inflated by [Indecipherable] 20%, compared to the third quarter of 2020 with businesses and our industrial coatings segment experiencing the largest increases, due to the raw material mix of those types of coatings. As a result all our businesses are securing additional selling price increases, due to significant increases we experienced in the second quarter and anticipate in the third quarter, we now fully expect to offset raw material cost inflation in the fourth quarter on 2021 on a run rate basis. As I’ve said previously, these current disruptions are temporary and we strongly believe there is sufficient capacity available in our supply chain once operating conditions normalize.

I’m very pleased that we’ve completed five by recent acquisitions since December 2020. In the third quarter these acquisitions will add about $500 million of incremental sales to our company. As we continue to integrate these acquisitions, we will start to realize meaningful synergies that will be a strong earnings catalyst. We are also witnessing domestic flight activity picking up all over the world. This will begin to benefit our commercial aftermarket business in aerospace in the second half of 2021. And the information we posted on our website yesterday evening, we’re projecting aggregate sales volumes to be up a low single-digit percentage in the third quarter, compared to the prior year quarter.

With differences by business and region. Including our acquisitions, we expect overall sales growth to be over 20%, compared to the third quarter of 2020. In addition, full-year 2021 adjusted earnings, excluding amortization expense and other non-recurring items is expected to be $7.40 to $7.60, which at the midpoint would be about 13% higher than the adjusted EPS we realized in 2019, despite the significant raw material inflationary pressures we are dealing with this year. And the fact that sales volumes are still not fully recovered from the pandemic, when compared to 2019.

Finally, I’m very pleased that our Board recently approved a dividend increase of about 10%. Our September payment coupled with the anticipated payment of a similar quarterly dividend in December, will mark 50 consecutive years of annual per share increases in the Company’s dividend. This is another testament of our Company’s legacy of consistently rewarding our shareholders and the confidence that the Board and I have and our ability to continue to generate and grow our operating cash flow.

In closing, I could not be more proud of our now 50,000 employees around the world, who is [Phonetic] share of our customers, our communities and our many stakeholders. Their dedication and commitment to doing better today than yesterday, every day helps ensure that PPG continues to protect and beautify the world.

Thank you for your continued confidence in PPG, this concludes our prepared remarks and now, Jason, would you please open the line for questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

Thank you. [Operator Instructions] Our first question comes from Ghansham Panjabi from Baird. Please go ahead.

Ghansham PanjabiRobert W. Baird — Analyst

Hey guys, good morning.

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning.

Ghansham PanjabiRobert W. Baird — Analyst

Yes, so I guess, you know, Michael, what do you think it’s a realistic timeline for the recovery in auto OEM production. I mean, between 2Q and 3Q that looks to be about the $200 million in total, it’s just a deferral of a couple of quarters? Or is it longer than that just based on what you see at this point? And then just also more broadly, you know, there has been some concern in the market about slowdown in China? Can you just sort of give us a real time pulse as to what you’re seeing in the region? Thanks so much.

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

So, Ghansham, first of all, I would say that the auto industry continues to have significant demand in all places around the world except for Europe. And we do anticipate Europe recovering, but probably had a little bit slower rate, because of the pace of vaccines over there. But I would tell you overall we’re anticipating that there is going to be about a 1 million cars less built in the third quarter than we had originally anticipated, because of the chip shortage. And right now, if you look at the overall pace of car builds, they are still below peak levels, but demand is recovering. So I anticipate that we’re going to have a very strong back half of 2021 and a very good 2022. So from that standpoint inventories across the lots, whether they are in the US or China or still at quite low levels. And so I’m still remain very optimistic.

From a China standpoint, specifically inventories are probably in that 40 to 45 day range, which is below average slightly, demand remained strong and what’s most encouraging to me is that the pace of the EVs continues to pick up. And as you know our positioning on EVs are very strong and so we anticipate continuing to be above industry build rates in content.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

And Ghansham, this is Vince. Just to dovetail on Michael’s comments, if you look at automotive OEM, particularly in the US one other benefit we expect to occur later this year, early next year as chips become available is the rental car fleets. The rental car fleets there is a sparse inventory in those fleets. And so we know those typically account for 10% to 15% of auto builds annually and we know that 10% to 15% will be higher going forward until they replenish those fleets. More broadly in China, we’re seeing — what we’re seeing a lower growth rate, we’re still seeing good growth across many of our end markets. So I think the anecdotal information you referenced is accurate, the growth has come off what was very high rates, but it’s still a solid growth rate going forward.

Operator

The next question comes from John McNulty from BMO. Please go ahead.

John P. McNultyBMO Capital Markets — Analyst

Yes. Thanks for taking my question. With regard to the raw material catch-up and where were you catch up with price. And I think you’re looking for — I think you said in the fourth quarter or towards the end of the year. Is that exclusively on price getting high enough to catch up? Or do you have any assumptions baked in for raw materials actually coming off from these levels? And then I guess tied to that anything about the raw material environment right now that’s making you think about possible changes to your supply chain and how you might be thinking about that going forward?

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

John, this is Michael. First, I’d say there is no change and how we are approaching raw material. We think this is a temporary dislocation, we’ve actually been very surprised at the recovery rate in this period, typically even if you go back and look at the most severe hurricanes, our suppliers have been able to get online and get back up to full rates pretty quickly this time. They’ve been significantly challenged and it’s been compounded by the lack of transportation equipment, not just equipment by more importantly drivers. So we’ve had a number of situations where we had to go out and buy spot material and there was challenging to get trucks to be able to deliver that, because of the inability of some of our suppliers.

So if you ask me, if there is any change we might do? There could be some additional suppliers brought into the mix to provide us some additional flexibility. But other than that I don’t think there’ll be any major changing — changes. But overall I would say, raw materials, the only one that we’re currently forecasting to be moderating is oil and as you saw oil in the past week has started to decline, so solvents would parallel the oil price changes. So that’s the only one we have right now in our model.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

And John, your first question on our assumptions on raws in the fourth quarter, we would be assuming that from — on a sequential basis, the third quarter, the fourth quarter the raws would stay in a similar — at a similar level, that’s our current assumption.

Operator

The next question comes from David Begleiter from Deutsche Bank. Please go ahead.

David BegleiterDeutsche Bank — Analyst

Thank you. Good morning. Michael, Vince, can you quantify how much worse price versus raws will be in Q3 versus Q2? And how much better you think there’ll be in Q4 versus Q3? Thank you.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Okay, David. I think — this is Vince, I think it’s similar to the question, John, just asked, again we gave guidance out to 20% raw material inflation give or take in Q3. We did include in the slide pack that was posted last night on our website. Our initial views of pricing those views will be somewhere between 4% and 5% in terms of our price capture, that’s still well short of what we need, we typically need in a 40% to 50% of the inflation to recover fully. So we’re still looking at additional pricing actions throughout 3Q across all of our businesses, all of our regions.

In 4Q to John’s — to John Bruno’s comment a minute ago, what we expect inflation to remain high, we do expect to remove some of the spot buys that we’re doing currently. Those are typically coming at a large premium to traditional pricing or list pricing, and we’re still looking at additional price capture or a full realization of the 3Q price capture in 4Q. So again, on a run rate basis our targets to get a fully offset in 4Q.

Operator

The next question comes from John Roberts from UBS. Please go ahead.

John RobertsUBS — Analyst

Thanks. The raw material and logistics comments all seem to be North American-centric. Could you give us maybe a more global view on what you’re seeing in the raw material outlook in Europe and Asia?

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, John, this is Michael. I would actually say that the Chinese raw material inflation was actually higher, that was driven primarily by epoxies, isocyanates and so those are the most challenging thing in China. The rapidity or the significant increases that we saw in China have, kind of, leveled off at this point in time. I would say in Europe they are also coming up, but not quite the same rate as China. Availability in Europe is better than availability in the US, but still not great. Availability in China is there, if you’re willing to pay for it. So for spot — so we’ve been really pushing our customers hard, if they want to buy more than contract that they need to pay extra for that additional volume. And so from that standpoint, we’ve been working closely with our customers on this additional raw material inflation. And I would say for Latin America, it kind of mirrors the US market.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

And John, if I could just add, we are seeing with ocean [Phonetic] going freight some of that has been significantly delayed. So even if there is availability and it’s a product that’s being ported around, it’s not showing up in time. So again that’s exasperating some of the issues. We expect again lot of these logistical issues to begin to self-correct in the third quarter of Q2, we have to remind everybody, Q2 is typically the peak quarter for a lot of companies, lot of industries. Q3 things start to moderate in terms of the overall global economic demand from the seasonal perspective. So again, we expect some of this to self-correct.

John RobertsUBS — Analyst

Thank you.

Operator

The next question comes from Stephen Byrne from Bank of America. Please go ahead.

Stephen ByrneBank of America Securities — Analyst

Yes, thank you. Wanted to drill in a little bit about the MoonWalk rollout in Europe, you mentioned 750 installations. Can you put that into perspective like how many auto body shops are there in Europe, is 750 just scratching the surface or is this meaningful? And with respect to the 20% that’s new customers, are you primarily targeting new accounts and share gains with this technology? And any comments on the outlook for share gains would be helpful here?

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes, Steve, this is Vince. If you look across Europe and the US, there’s thousands upon thousands body shops. So this is a small percent relative to the total universe. I think for us what’s most exciting is every one of these, we can make and get to market is immediately sold there is — with a back order — significant back orders in Europe. This is now we’re moving us now to the US, we are certainly providing our existing customers, who value the speed that this provides for their paint shops. The value that productivity we’re providing them with the opportunity to purchase first, but we do have a lot amount [Phonetic] of these that are really focused on new customer wins.

And I think as we rollout, kind of, 80/20 [Phonetic] strategy. We’re going to continue to see customer wins around this body shop productivity, which the premium shops, the MSOs prefer that’s their business model. So, still early innings here, but we are exceptionally pleased with the traction this is getting and I will continue to update you and continue to rollout more MoonWalk devices as we go forward.

Operator

The next question comes from Mike Sison from Wells Fargo. Please go ahead.

Michael SisonWells Fargo — Analyst

Hey guys, good morning. In terms of the raw material pricing gap, any thoughts between each of the segments? Are there some segments, a little bit better off than again in terms of getting pricing and closing that gap. Are there other segments that is doing, but might take a little bit more time to get to close the gap?

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, Mike, this is Michael. So I mean, it’s a traditional PPG model here. So the gap is the largest in automotive for two reasons: one, they had the biggest inflationary gap; and the second is that’s most difficult to get price increases with the automotive guys, but I am very pleased to announce that we have gotten positive price in every automotive region in the world. So we are making good progress there and well ahead where we were in 2017, 2018.

I would say the next inflationary would be our industrial coatings business. They also buy a lot of epoxies, isocyanates, so they would have been hit second most difficult. The business that’s impacted the least is aerospace, due to the raw material mix we have there. The place that we probably have closed the gap, the most is architectural, we’re working also hard on Traffic Solutions, this is a business that historically price was a secondary thought we’ve elevated that in this business and we’ve been very pleased with the pace of recovery in our Traffic Solutions business.

So I don’t think it’s any different than what we’ve seen in years past. And I think we’re going to continue to push hard to close that gap with our automotive customers. And that’s — I’m really pleased when you think about where we are in this cycle versus where we were in the last cycle, it’s light years apart.

Operator

The next question comes from Jeff Zekauskas from JPMorgan. Please go ahead.

Jeff ZekauskasJPMorgan — Analyst

Thanks very much. I think at the end of the last quarter you thought that you would earn between $2.15 and $2.20 a share. When did you realize that you wouldn’t be able to do that? Was it something that happened at the very end of the quarter? Or at the middle of the quarter? And in your — in net assessment of how much you might earn in the second quarter? What was the real sources of that? Was it an information issue? Or did it turn out that raw materials really rose very, very quickly in June? Can you talk about the history of the way you assessed the quarter — over the past couple of months?

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes, Jeff, this is Vince. So if you look — we came out early in April, we were one of the early reporters in April, it was directly after the weather event in Texas. At that point in time we were hearing from our suppliers and as Michael alluded to earlier, that this would be a multi-week start-up — or we start-up as we progressed through the quarter and especially in June, we continue to see outages and escalation of raw materials, specifically in the June time period, which is why we’re seeing Q3 higher than Q2 in terms of our raw material estimates. We continue to see outages, particularly around, transportation those outages continue to worsen, especially in June. And our customers continue to have spot production curtailments on their — from their perspective.

So as we were in June, we continue to see the automotive market be heavily impacted by chip shortages and a lot of customers in that particular industry, who had earmarked Q3 for some downtime actually took it in Q2. So as we went through the quarter, we saw the difficulties continue to grow. So that really was the timeline. And again as you look at our guidance for Q3 you could see some of these things are going to — certainly carry forward into the third quarter that we were not anticipating. We are anticipating them being rectified some point in mid-Q2, certainly is not — even before late Q2.

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

And Jeff, this is Michael. I would say we’re disappointed that the raw material inflation continue to high level throughout the quarter and it just seem to get worse. And when you bank on your suppliers saying they’re going to get you 20 trucks and they get you 10, that doesn’t help you. So we own up to this raw material inflation missing, you know, that’s our accountability.

Operator

Your next question comes from Prashant Juvekar from Citi. Please go ahead.

Prashant JuvekarCiti — Analyst

Yes, hi, good morning. Michael, given the shortage of raw materials, are you able to make enough paint product. And where do paint inventory stand in the supply chain in your stores, for example, or in the MSOs and refinish. And if paint inventories are below normal, could there be sort of paint restocking cycle sometime in second half or next year. Can you talk about that?

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

So, P.J., I tried to cover that in our opening remarks. Inventory levels in all our businesses are at exceptionally low levels. You saw that in our working capital numbers. I’ve actually asked our businesses to share with me the amount of product they made in April, May, June and versus how much of that went out the door and virtually everything we made went out the door. So inventories have gone backwards for us. We see very low inventories in the chain, and many of our customers as well. So if you look at our architectural guys, they typically don’t carry a lot, but they have even less. If you look at our industrial customers, I’ve had more calls from customers directly to me in the past quarter than I’ve had in the past probably three or four years. So customers have low inventories as well.

I do think there will be a restocking of course as you know in aerospace inventories, I would say we’re at rock bottom, because they couldn’t afford to buy anything previously, and so they’re trying to stock-up now ahead of what they anticipated increased demand. So I can’t really think of a single one of our businesses that have any kind of material inventory either on the shelf or at our customers.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

And P.J., this is Vince, if you look ahead, we do think again there’s very good underlying demand in many of the markets that we supply, automotive being a proxy, as we talked about earlier. There is several steps, where we see automotive sales continuing for multiple quarters. There is a restock that will take place just to get back to normal safety stock levels in our customers inventory. So we feel good for the next several quarters about the ability to sell product into our — or our customers’ ability to sell product more so than we have for quite some time, because of this very strong underlying demand around the world.

Operator

The next question comes from Frank Mitsch with Fermium Research. Please go ahead.

Frank MitschFermium Research — Analyst

Hey, good morning folks. Michael, you mentioned during this call that you maintain enough flexibility to do accretive cash deployment. And so as I’m listening, there is a number of comments in the release and a transcript on this call today that says, you guys are very constructive on your outlook. So just curious as to what extent might you be able to be opportunistic on buybacks?

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Well, Frank, as you know, we always prefer the acquisitions over the buybacks. Clearly, we take a look at this on a monthly basis. You saw that we finished the quarter with about $1.2 billion to $1.3 billion of cash. We’re coming into our very strong cash period where we generate a lot of cash in the back half of the year. I think our current ratio is 2.1, so from that standpoint and with cash coming in, we’re in a good position. There have been a number of the top 30 coatings company had been taken off the board in the last couple of, let’s call it last three or four quarters. So the availability of targets is probably not as good as it was six months ago.

So right now, we’re going to keep an open mind for that and we’re going to remain balanced in how we deploy cash, you saw that we increased our dividend, we think that was important certainly 50-years of dividend increases the significant milestone. And right now, I would say that I like our acquisition, you know, order log book, if you will, where we stand, but pipeline. But overall I would say we’re going to remain balanced on this viewpoint.

Operator

The next question comes from Laurent Favre from Exane BNPP. Please go ahead.

Laurent FavreExane BNP Paribas — Analyst

Yes, good morning all. And my question is on architectural and the guidance on Q3 with volumes down in both generic as in Europe. I was wondering, if you could talk about, I guess the different buckets of what’s driving that. Is it underlying demand? Is it share loss due to pricing availability of raw materials, DIY, comps, destocking, etc? Thank you.

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Laurent, so I would say from an architectural standpoint, there’s certainly been no share loss. We’ve been really pleased with how we’re performing in architectural, you saw the numbers we reported in both Europe and the US strong numbers. So from that standpoint, what we’re looking at is a shift as we anticipated would eventually happen of people moving from DIY to trade as people start to go on vacation and start to spend their money. They’re going to hire professionals that come in and do that. We see our trade order book increasing to offset the weakness in DIY. But what I would point out is DIY is still well above 2019 levels, and so when you combine the two, we’re pleased with the outlook on where we stand. I think the outlook we gave for the third quarter for architectural is quite strong and we are pleased with the performance of the business.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Hello, Laurent, I would add — this is Vince. I would add, we are still in the third quarter expecting to experience shortfalls for raw material supply — from coatings raw material supply. So it is moderating from our ability to supply some of our key products, especially on the US side. So trade in and DIY, so that is one of the limiters we do have in terms of our sales outlook.

Operator

The next question comes from Vincent Andrews from Morgan Stanley. Please go ahead.

Vincent AndrewsMorgan Stanley — Analyst

[Technical Issues] very much. Just wondering, we’re halfway through 2021. You maybe — you could give us an assessment of the cost that came out with COVID, the concentrate what you avoid as we’re now halfway through the year. Give a sense of — any better sense of how much of that’s going to come back and when?

John A. BrunoVice President of Investor Relations

Yes, Vincent, this is John. So we think we’re kind of at parity now there might be some travel and entertainment just some modest uptick was back as things continue to open up. But we felt that on an annualized basis that we could bank, we set a — on a quarterly basis $25 million to $30 million of temp savings, we had our $30 million of benefit in the second quarter. So I think this is something we probably won’t talk much more about, because at this stage, I think we’ve made some of these costs permanent reductions and now we’ll just ebb and flow more with our volume and demand activity.

Vincent AndrewsMorgan Stanley — Analyst

Thanks very much.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

And Vincent this is, Vince. Yes, I do think when you look at our multi-year selling, general, administrative costs as a percent of sales, you can not only see the interim savings as we call these dropping to the bottom line. But you could also see more importantly the structural savings that we’ve introduced for a couple of years now and those are also benefiting us. And then on top of that, so just to dovetail from Michael on the acquisitions, we do have a significant amount of synergy savings targeted for the five acquisitions. We gave out our target earlier in the year, we are on target for that although some of these have just closed. So a lot of those savings will be visible on a more visible in 2022.

Operator

Our next question comes from Kevin McCarthy from Vertical Research Partners. Please go ahead.

Kevin McCarthyVertical Research Partners — Analyst

Yes. Good morning. Michael, there’s been a lot of focus on automotive as a source of the negative variances. I’m curious, if we put automotive on the side for the moment. Would you care to call out other businesses that would have disappointed relative to your prior expectations? And if so, was that more driven by demand variance or price cost spread that was spread across many of your businesses?

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, Kevin. So the two businesses that were impacted besides automotive the most was architectural, due to Emulsions and Traffic Solutions the same thing. So we had a hard time getting the Emulsions and Resins from our suppliers. You can’t make paint without that, and so we were hand to mouth on those kinds of things, despite having significant demand. If you go into any of our stores or going into the big boxes are asking the DOTs there would all tell you that all the suppliers are struggling to put paint on the shelves. So I think that was the most material things. But it is interesting, we didn’t track it, because I didn’t think it will become a material number. But the number of other places that chip show up, whether it’s appliances or other heavy-duty equipment, so everybody has been impacted somewhat, but it didn’t — it really didn’t turn out to be enough of a number to call out. But I would say the two biggest ones are architectural and Traffic Solutions.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes and Kevin, I’ll just add that in many of our businesses, automotive, obviously the two Michael mentioned Traffic Solutions, architectural, we can even get into aerospace some of our industrial businesses refinish. We have a higher order book exiting Q2 that we just could not fulfill. So our order book as we alluded to earlier is very strong, we just got to be able to fulfill that with product availability.

Operator

The next question comes from Arun Viswanathan from RBC Capital Markets. Please go ahead.

Arun ViswanathanRBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Great, thanks for taking my question. So I guess, I just wanted to go back to the last question a little bit and understand, I guess potentially some of the bridge items for ’22 versus ’21. So you’ll have a full-year of accretion on many of the deals, you know, have kind of normalization in some of your volumes and hopefully you will caught up on price cost. So I think you made the comment that your ’21 EPS is going to be a double-digit growth from ’19 levels? Is that a fair starting point, when you think about ’22? I mean is there, just given what you’ve seen on the cost side, is there opportunities to continue to grow margins as you recover that price cost spread in ’22 as well? Thanks.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes, Arun, this is Vince. A little bit longer look and we want to do at this point in time. There is still a lot of fluidity just in the economies out there. I think we’ve tried to lay out today some of the positive things we think are in store, not only for us, but the industry, good demand. We do think PPGs specific these acquisitions along with the synergies that come of them. We hope we get to a normal price cost environment, but it’s still too early to make that call for what would be supply chain looks like going into 2022 right now. We think it will normalize, but it’s just too early to make all these calls at this point in time of the year. We certainly feel very optimistic about next year just given the overall demand outlook. Typically when you have strong demand that parlays into positive results, better cost spread on a bigger sales base, etc.

Operator

The next question comes from Duffy Fischer from Barclays. Please go ahead.

Duffy FischerBarclays — Analyst

Yes, good morning, fellows. Just wanted to drill down on volume, particularly in Q3 if you can. You know, Vince, you talked about 4%, 4.5% price rolling through and relative to your low single-digit growth, I mean, that’s kind of all the growth, then that would be in both segments is price, which will mean the volumes, kind of, flat to maybe down? And Michael called out $150 million of kind of foregone sales, because of the issues, which might add another 4% to that. So what I would say is kind of the run rate volume growth looks like it’s 3%-ish in Q3, which feels pretty light given how early we are in the cycle. So can you just talk about what you think the underlying volume growth is in your business is kind of Q3? And then how is that set the table then for continued volume growth the rest of this year into next year?

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes, Duffy, I’ll try to give this a shot, a lot of numbers there. Look, when you look by business, we’re still constrained, as Michael alluded to on our ability to fully satisfy our order book. We expect that to continue well into Q3, if not fully through Q3. Some of our customers are still well constrained on their ability to produce. So again we gave out the guidance of low single-digit organic growth. And we think there’s a lot of moving pieces in there. What again I’ll just pass through to use our confidence level that we’re not going to be able, as an industry to supply the demand that’s out there even by the end of Q3. So how these pieces come together Q3 versus Q4, we still see how that’s determined that strong, very strong underlying demand, recovery demand occurring in aerospace, starting to occur in aerospace, some demand in refinish, as traffic miles pick up, so we’re just confident there is underlying demand there and we just going to be able to fulfill it.

Operator

The next question comes from Bob Koort from Goldman Sachs. Please go ahead.

Bob KoortGoldman Sachs — Analyst

Thank you. Good morning. Michael, Vince, I think you guys talked about having to go into the spot market for procurement. How tolerant are your customers going to be of that is the basis for price hikes and sustaining price hike spend to next year at some of the spot markets start to normalize a bit? What gives you confidence you can retain those price hikes? And is there any scope for you to use the force majeure impact that you suffered to some have pass those along on your own. In terms of your customers or is that just something that doesn’t happen? Thank you.

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

No, Bob, this is Michael. We have been aggressive and trying to get our customers pay for the additional freight charges that are — if they want to move up orders, if they want to — us to buy from spot people in order to keep them running. We have gone to them and ask them to pay for that. But that’s a portion of the overall raw material increase, even without the spot we just still been 15% to 17%. So these are real increases, they’re seeing them in their own cost structure as well. So they are not able to debate whether or not we’re having these things. So as Vince alluded to earlier, we need to get about 50% of the overall increase. And so we’ve been out there with some very significant increases, and I think we’re making a lot of progress in that regard. Clearly, we’d like to have move faster, but when I look back on 2002 — 2017, 2018, we’re well ahead of that. So I think the customers are very understanding of this and what it takes is the whole market to move to capture it and we’ve been out early and often, and we’ll have to continue to do that in 3Q and 4Q.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

And Bob, I’ll just add. Most of our customers are facing similar issues beyond just coatings and they’re trying to supply their customers and their shorter product as well. So this is a pervasive issue that’s well known across the materials and industrial spaces. And our customers are seeing inflationary pressures from a variety of different industries. We’re one of those industries of course. And so again that the acceptance level as Michael alluded to is higher today than it certainly was in past cycles.

Operator

The next question comes from Mike Harrison from Seaport Research Partners. Please go ahead.

Mike HarrisonSeaport Research Partners — Analyst

Hi, good morning. Had a question on the Aerospace business within the aftermarket business, do you have situations where some of these aircraft have been [Indecipherable] for several months. And they need significant maintenance or even re-painting before they return to service. Maybe just talk a little bit about how that aftermarket business is — recovery is playing out?

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes. So the easy one is on the repaint side, they don’t need re-painting per se, but if any — if a customer had returned planes to the less lease ore, those planes will be returned in a white format. So we have been painting a lot of planes white during the pandemic, now we’re not paying any white right now, because they’re going to be returned to service. So there will be a pickup of that. Also what we historically fine is after events like this you see some rebranding being done. So we’re anticipating that will also happen maybe in 2023, 2024.

But overall, right now, when you take a plane out of storage, if it was properly stored there is some maintenance, they need to do on it before it goes back into service, but then they don’t have to do the big heavy checks that they do at the big maintenance cycles. But overall inventory is exceptionally low, our order book in — or I should say our book-to-bill ratio has improved significantly in aerospace, our backlog has increased. And so right now, the biggest challenge we have in our aerospace business is labor, making sure we get enough qualified labor to work in the planes they will get the product out the door. So we’re feeling very, very good about aerospace on the MRO side. We’re not there yet, obviously on the OEM side, builds are picking up slightly on the 737, they’re picking up slightly on the A321, but for the bigger birds, they’re not picking up at all and we don’t anticipate seeing that range pick up until 2023 time period, because of a lack of international flights.

Operator

[Operator Instructions] The next question comes from Jaideep Pandya from Onfield Investment Research. Please go ahead.

Jaideep PandyaOnfield Investment Research — Analyst

Thanks a lot. Just a question really around the logistics, so obviously there is a significant increase in container rates out of China. So as and when the container rate or other logistics situation sort of normalizes, do you expect sharp reversal in some of your raw material basket, because if I think about all, it has only gone up, let’s say, call it circa-20% in the last quarter, but some of your raw materials have more than doubled and literally volumes that are coming out of China into Europe and US are gone down a lot in all the raw materials. So once the container rate situation normalizes, do you see a sharp reversal of raw material dynamic? Thanks a lot.

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, Jaideep, this is Michael. I would say the container rate is only a portion of the overall raw material spend. The bigger challenge overall has been the supply-demand issue for the base raw materials. Certainly, we are not happy with the container prices, it has escalated significantly. But if we could get the overall base supply demand balance back in balance, if you will, in our supply chain. I think prices would start to normalize somewhat. We don’t see that happening in 2021. So right now we’re still anticipating significant inflation when we said is 20% in Q3 and will have significant inflation in Q4. So as far as we can currently look out, we’re still looking at a pretty inflationary cycle.

Vincent J. MoralesSenior Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes, again, this is Vince. If I could just add, so what we’ve seen is a compounding of events here, one was the — obviously the shock in March to the chemical supply chain that was then compounded by the logistics systems got out of sequence, which was then compounded by some of the international logistics not only got to sequence, but we’re higher priced. So these kinds of chain events, as we’re really push these raw materials up some of that will unwind as we get out of the season. As I said earlier Q2 is the peak season. But we do expect these raw material costs will remain elevated for the balance of the year.

Operator

The next question comes from Edlain Rodriguez from Jefferies. Please go ahead.

Edlain RodriguezJefferies — Analyst

Thank you, good morning guys. Michael, quick question, I mean, one quick one about medium term volumes. So when you look at the couple of businesses that are still below pre-pandemic level. Do you have a sense of when they catchup and essentially given the pace of activity you’re seeing. Do you get there in 2022 or is it more on our like 2022 to be or so?

Michael H. McGarryChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Well, the only business that will not be recovered by 2022 in my opinion is aerospace, OEM. So aerospace, MRO will probably be 90% back, certainly in the military has already back. Refinish we saw last year when Europe opened up, we saw the refinish miles and Europe come back very strongly. So we’re anticipating the same thing as they get the vaccines out that we anticipate the back half of 2021, we’ll recover significantly and by hopefully all of 2022 Europe will be back to normal. We see in the US already, we’re at 90% plus recovered in refinish and actually what you’re seeing is a little shift from traffic from the cities into the suburbs.

So collisions are actually improving every month here in the US and of course in China, it’s all the way back to normal. And we see a snapback in India whenever we see the folks get allowed to travel again. So most places it is vaccine-related. And so, we’re pretty confident, if you go through the rest of our businesses we’re already back and industrial were mostly back in automotive, our packaging business is well ahead. The demand in aluminum packaging is very strong, so our packaging business is going to have another record year this year and next year.

If you look at our PMC business protective now that oil prices recovered, I expect protective to continue to recover, as well as they start to protect these high value assets in the oil fields. So I’m very comfortable that we’re going to have a strong back half of the demand for 2021 and a continued demand recovery in 2022.

Operator

There are no further questions at this time. Mr. John Bruno, I turn the call back over to you.

John A. BrunoVice President of Investor Relations

Yes. Thank you, Jason. I’d like to thank everyone for their time and interest in PPG. This concludes our second quarter earnings call.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Disclaimer

This transcript is produced by AlphaStreet, Inc. While we strive to produce the best transcripts, it may contain misspellings and other inaccuracies. This transcript is provided as is without express or implied warranties of any kind. As with all our articles, AlphaStreet, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for your use of this content, and we strongly encourage you to do your own research, including listening to the call yourself and reading the company’s SEC filings. Neither the information nor any opinion expressed in this transcript constitutes a solicitation of the purchase or sale of securities or commodities. Any opinion expressed in the transcript does not necessarily reflect the views of AlphaStreet, Inc.

© COPYRIGHT 2021, AlphaStreet, Inc. All rights reserved. Any reproduction, redistribution or retransmission is expressly prohibited.

Most Popular

Digital wine club Winc gears up for $80-mln IPO. Here’s all you need to know

The virus-driven shift in consumer behavior has made businesses revisit their strategies, and the alcohol industry is no exception. While the IPO frenzy continues unabated, led by the technology and

IPO news: What to look for when Portillo’s Inc. makes its market debut next week

The food industry is witnessing a rebound as people revert to their earlier habits of eating out. Street food has always been popular among those who are looking for a

Charles Schwab Corp. (SCHW) Q3 earnings beat estimates amid 87% revenue growth

Financial services company The Charles Schwab Corporation (NYSE: SCHW) on Friday reported strong revenue and earnings growth for the third quarter. The numbers also beat Wall Street's forecast. Third-quarter revenues

Add Comment
Loading...
Cancel
Viewing Highlight
Loading...
Highlight
Close
Top