Categories Consumer, Earnings Call Transcripts

Zumiez Inc (ZUMZ) Q1 2022 Earnings Call Transcript

ZUMZ Earnings Call - Final Transcript

Zumiez Inc (NASDAQ: ZUMZ) Q1 2022 earnings call dated Jun. 02, 2022

Corporate Participants:

Rick Brooks — Chief Executive Officer

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Analysts:

Richard Magnusen — B. Riley — Analyst

Corey Tarlowe — Jefferies — Analyst

Mitch Kummetz — Seaport Research — Analyst

Presentation:

Operator

Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen, and welcome to this Zumiez Incorporated First Quarter Fiscal 2022 Earnings Conference Call. [Operator Instructions]

Before we begin, I’d like to remind everyone of the company’s Safe Harbor language. Today’s conference call includes comments concerning Zumiez Incorporated business outlook and contains forward-looking statements. These forward-looking statements and all other statements that may be made on this call are not based on historical facts that are subject to risks and uncertainties. Actual results may differ materially. Additional information concerning a number of factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from the information that will be discussed is available in Zumiez’s filings with the SEC.

At this time, I will turn the call over to Rick Brooks, Chief Executive Officer. Mr. Brooks, you may begin.

Rick Brooks — Chief Executive Officer

Hello everyone and thanks for joining us on the call today. With me is Chris Work, our Chief Financial Officer. I’ll begin today’s call with a few remarks about the first quarter before I hand the call over to Chris who will take you through the numbers and our outlook. After that, we’ll open up the call to your questions.

When we reported record Q1 results a year ago, and more recently, when we discussed our outlook for 2022 during our fourth quarter call in March, we outlined several reasons why the first quarter of 2022 would be down on a year-over-year basis. To reiterate, a year ago, we achieved over 100% revenue growth compared with Q1 of 2020 and over 30% compared with pre-pandemic levels in Q1 of 2019, as our teams did an amazing job capturing a large share of the outsized consumer demand that was fueled by record record domestic stimulus in early 2021. This was all contemplated when we provide guidance for Q1 sales to be between USD215 million and USD221 million. As you saw from our release, sales came at the high end of our range at $220.7 million, which represents a 21% decrease compared with Q1 last year, an increase of 60% and 4% over Q1 2020 and 2019 respectively.

On top of the difficult sales comparisons, the operating environment has become increasingly more challenging due to supply chain bottlenecks, higher logistics costs, a tight labor market and high levels of inflation. These factors were also incorporated into our outlook, but some of the headwinds were stronger as the quarter unfolded, which combined with a shift in timing of certain expenses resulted in EPS coming in $0.02 below our guidance range of breakeven to $0.10. While we’re disappointed that our first quarter profitability should fell short of our expectations, there are elements of our performance that highlight the underlying strength of our business and the progress we made capturing market share over the past several years. In particular, we experienced strong full-price selling across each of our geographic regions, and despite the tough compare in the U.S. from the stimulus fueled spending a year ago, product margins were up domestically to go along with the strong results across our international entities in Canada, Europe and Australia. We believe this reflects the strength of our merchandise offering and deep customer connections.

If you remove the impact that COVID had on our results both positively and negatively over the past 2 years and compare our performance to pre-pandemic levels or look at the business over the past decade, you get a clear picture of the growth trajectory since the recession of 2009 and ’10. From 2011 to 2021, we grew sales at a 10-year compound annual growth rate of 8%, while during that same time period, we grew diluted earnings per share at a 10-year compound annual growth rate of 15%. This represents substantial progress towards our long-term strategy and meaningful shareholder value.

Throughout Zumiez’s 40 year plus history, we’ve managed the business through multiple different fashion cycles, countless trend changes and several economic boom and bust and now a global pandemic. While economies of the world and the consumer categories we operate in are inherently volatile, our flexible business model and consumer-centric growth strategy rooted in strong brand and culture that we’ve been evolving since the company’s inception have allowed us to not just survive these periods of instability but emerge from them even stronger. While the first quarter wasn’t without its challenges, and comparisons remain elevated throughout the remainder of the year, we are confident that when the consumer comes out to shop during the peak periods of back-to-school and holiday, we will outperform the competition and extend our market-leading position.

Our confidence is rooted in the strength of our teams and great brand partnerships we forged that bring diversity and uniqueness to our customers that allow them to express themselves in a unique way. Our teams put a significant amount of effort into understanding our customers not only today but how they will continue to evolve and what will be important to future generations. This thinking is embedded in our culture and is reflected in who we hire and how we operate.

In the past few months, we held both our annual 100K training and recognition event as well as our manner to treat in-person. These are both great cultural events where we’re able to recognize our top performers and also bring our managers through a multiyear training format that allows them to be better teachers and better leaders. There is our belief that these events create momentum for our teams and motivate them as a return to their stores with renewed energy and enthusiasm for the Zumiez brand and cultural experience.

Our carefully crafted model is built with the customer at the center, allowing them to control the what, when and how of their shopping experience. Our channels organization with inventory visibility from all touch points and back-end capabilities allow us to create synergies regardless of the channel in which sales originate. Each of these distinct attributes will serve us well with today’s varied and rapidly evolving shopping trends and logistically challenged environment.

We know that times such as these create opportunities. With the right people, strategies and resources in place, we will work to capture those opportunities from our strong competitive position. With that, I’ll turn the call to Chris to discuss financials.

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Thanks, Rick, and good afternoon, everyone. I’m going to start with a review of our first quarter results, I’ll then provide an update on our second quarter to date sales trends before providing some perspective on how we’re thinking about the full year. First quarter net sales were $220.7 million, down 20.9% from $279.1 million in the first quarter of 2021 and up 3.6% from the pre-pandemic first quarter of 2019. Compared with the first quarter of 2021, the decrease in sales is driven by the significant benefits from the U.S. stimulus realized in early 2021 and to a lesser extent the continued inflationary pressure on the consumer and increased competition for discretionary dollar. These forces were partially offset by increased sales in each of our international geographies.

From a regional perspective, North America net sales were $186.3 million, a decrease of 25.1% compared to 2021 and a decrease of 0.9% compared to the same period in 2019. Other international sales, which consist of Europe and Australia, were $34.4 million, up 13% from last year and up 37.5% for the same period in 2019. Excluding the impact of foreign currency translation, first quarter North America net sales decreased 25% and other international net sales increased 21.8% compared with 2021.

First quarter gross profit was $72.4 million compared to $103.2 million in the first quarter of last year and gross margin as a percentage of sales was 32.8% for the quarter compared to 37% in the first quarter of 2021 and 31.2% in the first quarter of 2019. As Rick highlighted, product margins were strong in all geographies on full price selling this quarter. But the sales mix shift away from our higher margin U.S. business overshadowed this impact as the company level resulting in a mix driven decrease of 20 basis points. The 420 basis point decrease in gross margin was primarily driven by lower sales in the quarter coupled with elevated expenses due to higher logistics and labor costs. Store occupancy costs deleveraged by 300 basis points on the lower sales volume. Web shipping costs increased by 80 basis points. Distribution center costs deleverage by 70 basis points and product margin decreased 20 basis points related to the mix as discussed. The decreases were partially offset by a 70 basis point improvement related to impairments of leased assets booked in the prior year first quarter that did not repeat this year.

SG&A expense was $71.9 million or 32.6% of net sales in the first quarter compared to $68.9 million or 24.7% of net sales a year ago and $65.5 million or 30.7% of net sales in the pre-pandemic first quarter of 2019. The 790 basis point increase in SG&A expense as a percentage of sales resulted from the following. 400 basis points in our store wages tied to both deleverage on lower sales as well as our wage rate increase; 200 basis points related to non-wage store costs primarily impacted by lower sales levels and increased rate pressure; 180 basis points in training and events primarily relates to the movement of our annual 100K event into the first quarter of 2022 and out of the fourth quarter of 2021; 130 basis points in corporate costs, and 110 basis points in non-store wages. These headwinds were partially offset by 150 basis point benefit related to a one-time $3.6 million government stimulus payment related to our European business and 80 basis point decrease in incentive compensation.

Operating income in the first quarter 2022 was $0.5 million or 0.2% of net sales compared with operating income in the prior year of $34.3 million or 12.3% of net sales. In the first quarter 2019, we had an operating profit of $1 million or 0.5% of net sales. Net loss for the first quarter was $0.4 million or a negative $0.02 per diluted share. This compares to net income of $26.4 million or $1.03 per diluted share for the first quarter 2021 and net income of $0.8 million or $0.03 per share for the first quarter of 2019.

Our effective tax rate for the first quarter of 2022 was 134.2% compared to 25.7% in the year-ago period. The tax rate in the quarter is inflated due primarily to the allocation of income across entities and the exclusion of net losses in certain jurisdictions. We expect our annual tax rate for the year to be approximately 26%. Looking at earnings in the first quarter compared to our guidance, we experienced a few deviations to what we laid out in March, including cost challenges around labor, shipping and various other items worth $0.18 as well as timing of expenses that were previously planned later in the year were at $0.06. These issues were offset by a large one-time governmental subsidy payment in Europe worth $0.12 and a reduction of our incentive compensation expense.

Turning to the balance sheet, the business ended the quarter in a strong financial position, we had cash and current marketable securities of $173 million as of April 30, 2022 compared to $400.4 million as of May 1, 2021. The $227 million decrease in cash and current marketable securities over the trailing 12 months was driven primarily by share repurchases of $281.6 million and capital expenditures of $16.5 million, partially offset by cash generated through operations of $83.5 million. Over the past 12 months, the company repurchased 6.5 million shares at an average cost of $43.37 per share and a total cost of $281.6 million. Currently, we have no open share repurchase authorization. As of April 30, 2022, we had no debt on the balance sheet and continue to maintain our full unused credit facilities. We ended the quarter with $141.9 million in inventory, compared with $136.5 million last year, an increase of $5.4 million or 3.9%. On a constant currency basis, our inventory levels were up 4.1%. Overall, the inventory on hand is healthy and selling at a favorable margin.

Now to our fiscal May sales results. Net sales for the 4-week period ended May 28, 2022 decreased 20.9% compared to the 4-week period ended May 29, 21. Compared to the 4-week period ended June 1, 2019, net sales increased 3.3%. From a regional perspective, net sales for the North America business for the 4 weeks ended May 28, 2022 decreased 23.5% over the comparable period last year and were down 2.2% compared to the 4-week period ended June 1, 2019. Meanwhile, our other international business decreased 0.3% versus last year and increased 55.4% compared to the same period of 2019. Excluding the impact of foreign currency translation, North American net sales for the 4 weeks ended May 28, 2022 decreased 23.2% from the prior year and decreased 2.5% from 2019, while international net sales increased 13.9% compared with 2021 and increased 62.8% compared to 2019. From a category perspective, in fiscal May 2022, all categories were down in total sales from the prior year. Men’s was our most negative category followed by hardgoods, accessories, women’s and footwear.

With respect to our outlook, I want to remind everyone that formulating our guidance involves some inherent uncertainty and complexity in estimating sales, product margins and earnings growth given the variety of internal and external factors that impact our performance. Furthermore, while our guidance does include the negative impact in 2022 as we anniversary the 2021 domestic stimulus, it does not include any potential future closures tied to the pandemic. With that in mind, we are currently expecting the total sales for the second quarter of fiscal 2022 will be between USD232 million and USD239 million with continued pressure on sales during the quarter, as we anniversary the impact of domestic stimulus from 2021, the inflationary pressure on the consumer in the current environment and the continued competition for the discretionary dollar. Consolidated operating profit as a percent of sales for the second quarter is expected to be between 5% and 6.5% and we anticipate diluted earnings per share will be roughly USD0.45 to USD0.55. Included in our guidance is the addition of costs as we continue to re-institute store hours for normal operations, bring back travel and include the continued impact some of the cost challenges we experienced in the first quarter.

Now I want to give you a few thoughts — a few updated thoughts on how we’re looking at fiscal 2022. With the first quarter of 2022 behind us, we are more cautious on how we’re looking at the full year and the potential impact of the current operating environment including the lingering impacts of the prior year stimulus, inflationary pressures, the continued pressure on consumer discretionary spending and global unrest. Given these pressures, we intend to remain flexible and agile in adjusting inventory, expense and capital allocation plans based on any changes in these events.

We now anticipate the total sales will be down in the high single digits in 2022 as compared to 2021. This is inclusive of our second quarter guidance and anticipates further pressures in the back half of the year given the outsized inflation concerns in the market. In fiscal 2021, we achieved peak product margins once again representing our 6th year in a row of product margin expansion. We are currently working on initiatives to continue driving product margins domestically and internationally, how we recognize the external challenges of driving margins with continued inflation and economic uncertainty entering 2022. Given this, we are closely managing inventory and remain flexible as demand fluctuates. We exited the first quarter of fiscal 2022 with a healthy inventory, which was up approximately 4% from both the first quarter of fiscal year 2021 and 2019. As such, we currently believe we can drive consolidated product margin to be roughly flat for the year inclusive of the ongoing mix challenges we experienced in the first quarter.

We continue to manage costs across the business. However, as our current sales projections, we are anticipating deleverage domestically, while our international entities show leverage as they capitalize and continued market share gains, and more normalized operations. We currently anticipate year-over-year operating profit dollars will be down approximately 37% to 41% for fiscal 2022 on the drop in sales. The return to normal for items like mall hours, training and events as well as the added cost pressures we are experiencing in the current operating environment. Diluted earnings per share for the full year is currently planned to decrease much less than operating profit as we’re able to capitalize on our buyback program executed over the last year. We currently anticipate 2022 diluted earnings per share to be between USD$3.55 and USD3.80 compared to USD4.85 in 2021, USD3.00 in 2020 and USD2.62 in 2019.

We are currently planning our business assuming an annual effective tax rate of approximately 26%. We are planning to open approximately 34 new stores during the year, including approximately 15 stores in North America, 14 stores in Europe and 5 stores in Australia. We expect capital expenditures for the full 2022 fiscal year to be between USD30 million and USD32 million compared to USD16 million in 2021 with the majority of the increase tied to the addition of new stores in 2022. We expect that depreciation and amortization, including non-cash lease expense will be approximately $22 million roughly flat to the prior year. We are currently projecting our share count for the full year to be approximately 19.5 million diluted shares. And with that operator, we’d like to open the call up for questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] And our first question comes from Jeff Van Sinderen of B. Riley. Your line is open.

Richard Magnusen — B. Riley — Analyst

Hi, this is Richard Magnusen in for Jeff Van Sinderen, and thank you for taking our call. Given the higher fuel prices, are there any discernible trends that you’ve noticed in store traffic versus UPT and ADS that suggest that the consumer is buying more at one-time and shopping less frequently?

Rick Brooks — Chief Executive Officer

I can’t talk — we’ll look here, but I don’t think I’ve seen the typical trends we see Richard in these scenarios is that is what happens, weekends become a bit bigger, people consolidate trips. I haven’t sensed that at this point in the — in looking at sales. But I think that is a next station we would have, as time progresses, we release high gas prices, we will see consumers consolidate trip and we will expect to see, again, that would mean weekends, a little bit better, historically, it’s how it’s worked for us rather than weekdays.

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Rich, I just add to that. I’d just add to that kind of correlated to that we are seeing a pickup in our own private label merchandise as we think about kind of what that trade-off could be, we have seen a little bit of a spike there in the first quarter, which also indicates some of the pressures that the consumer might be under.

Richard Magnusen — B. Riley — Analyst

Okay. And then can you speak more about how you have planned back to school merchandise receipt flow this year versus last year. And any other color that you can add on supply chain, getting better or worse overall.

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Sure. I mean I think what you saw from us here in this release is, it’s really kind of a relook at the back half of the year. I think one thing that we’ve seen over the last couple of years is with the stimulus and outsized spend and really actually our results coming into the pandemic in ’17, ’18, ’19, is we’ve run really strong results and I think that’s a testament to the strategies we put in place and the way that we’re speaking to the customer and so we’re really pleased with how we’ve performed. Obviously, when you run outsized results during the period of stimulus, you might have more challenging results as you anniversary that, so I think we’re seeing some of that and then we’re looking at kind of just where the consumer is at with the pressures on them, the inflationary pressures on them, the rising costs really across pretty much all areas of their ecosystem as well as retail is probably over-indexed a little bit over the last couple of years as people have been doing less travel and less experiential. So I think there is more competition for discretionary dollars. So we thought about a lot of that coming into the year, how we plan Q1? Obviously, the results of Q1 and now that the first month of Q2 had us just sort of revisit how we’re thinking about the year as we think about back-to-school. To your question, specifically, we have planned a little bit more of a decrease than what we had coming into the year, we’re starting to think about that, both in back-to-school and end to holiday to plan inventory receipts a little bit lower in light of where the environment is. There is no — not going to be a major change in cadence year-over-year. We’re still expecting the back-to-school season to flow in a similar cadence to what we’ve seen the last couple of years, but I think overall, we’re planning a little more conservatively just based on the backdrop of where consumer is facing and what we’re seeing in the marketplace. Obviously, one of the benefits of our business is we can adjust. We have really good relationships with our brand partners and we continue to work with them to navigate this environment. As you know, a large portion of what we do is screenables and and quick moving. So I think we can, as we start to see differences or movement in trends, we will be adjusting, but we are looking at the back half more conservatively as we’ve laid out in our guidance today.

Rick Brooks — Chief Executive Officer

And I would just add Richard that as we said in the comments that I’m very confident that as we get into those peak windows matter what the perform — our performance is I think on a relative basis I feel good that’s going to be strong relative to our competitors.

Richard Magnusen — B. Riley — Analyst

Okay and then lastly, what else can you tell us about the trends in the European business and the outlook there?

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Sure. Yeah, I mean, as we think about Europe overall, I think, obviously, we’re very proud of how the Europe team is operating. This is a super challenging environment. We had really strong hopes coming into this year about just the momentum we’ve built there and obviously with the war in Ukraine, we talked about in our March call, we did see a tick down on kind of their performance and has been well-documented here over the last couple of months is obviously really impacted the cost structure and inflation structure over there specifically around energy, but some of the same concerns we’re having here. So I think as we think about kind of where we’re at in the short term, the results remain positive which we’re really happy with. They had some closures last year, so that while positive results in Europe, they’re not as quite as high as we originally anticipated. I will say, Q2 is off to a better start. It’s still a little bit lower than what we are planning coming into the year, we stated on the call here just a few minutes ago that we did obtain a subsidy that helped offset some of the losses we had incurred across 2020 and 2021 and the amount of about $3.6 million. So that did help overall, but I think it is still a difficult operating environment, but one that I think our teams are are really executing here and that’s kind of gets me to thinking about the long term for Europe and where we’re at. And I would tell you we feel really confident in our position just as we have in March and calls prior to that and I think that that reasoning is really hinged on the fact that this is a good time to invest given where the market is at, you’re going to see us as we’ve laid out on the call open 14 stores in Europe this year, we’ll open some new markets. We did, we did open our first store in Norway and we expect to continue to grow across Europe. I think it’s in line with our strategy, is aligned with kind of how we — what we feel is right and I think not only can this investment really help us capitalize on the European market. But I think we are one of the largest lifestyle retailers operating across Europe at this point. And I think we have a lot of room for growth. So we’re excited about that. I think it means a lot for our customers there and I think it helps us from a global perspective with how we’re able to serve brands and I think that’s a big piece of what we’re doing when you think about the idea of brands emerge locally and they grow globally and this platform that we’re building of operations now in the U.S., Canada, Europe and Australia, it really does help us identify those trends, work with those brands, move brands around the world when we see things that might be working. And I think that’s something we’re pretty excited about. So you know, as we mentioned in March, coming into 2022, we had built a plan that we thought would get us to breakeven or even slightly positive. Obviously, we had to rethink that a little bit just with the war and where things are at, we’re not quite as optimistic. But again, we feel like we’re really close to turning to profitability level, we feel like our teams are executing at a high level, the stores we’ve been opening over the last few years despite the pandemic challenges when they’ve been opened have performed much better. And I think we’re really kind of dialing in that formula. And I think this is a good growth opportunity for us in the future.

Richard Magnusen — B. Riley — Analyst

Thank you. I’ll jump back in the queue.

Operator

And our next question comes from Corey Tarlowe of Jefferies. Your line is open.

Corey Tarlowe — Jefferies — Analyst

Hi, good afternoon and thank you for taking my questions. How are you thinking generally about the promotional environment and what are your expectations for the environment going forward?

Rick Brooks — Chief Executive Officer

I’ll start Corey, and then let Chris add his thoughts too, but again, as we’ve said here, we feel pretty darn good about our inventory position and we think we can, as the direction Chris gave you and thinking about where product margin can be for this year, we feel obviously pretty good about where we’re at. Now, there is one big caveat with that in this environment depending on how much more difficult the broad macroeconomic environment is. Our competitors own a lot more inventory and it could — if they drive down prices a lot with and we may have to react to it, but that is not our current plan. We feel we can manage through it well and we gave you the direction, kind of, we’re thinking about our own cadence at this stage of the game relative to product margin. Chris, I don’t know if you have anything else to add.

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

No, I’d just add. I think the product margin for us, we mentioned on the call is this last year was our 6th year in a row of product margin gains and as we disclosed in the last couple of years, the last year was 110 basis point increase, the year before that was 70 basis point increase. So we’ve made real substantial progress on some of our initiatives over the last few years both during the pandemic, and prior to the pandemic. So I’d just call out that there is a big benefit there. I mean we were really happy with how our business performed in the first quarter. I think our teams really executed the plan in regards to where we are planning product margin. We did mention product margin was down 20 basis points, but that’s really more a factor of mix than anything else. If you know, our U.S. business runs at a higher product margin than our international entities, which is also an opportunity for us because our international teams as they gain scale and they continue to grow, we’ll have more opportunity to grow product margin and we’re seeing that today in how they’re executing. So I think Rick’s totally right, — we’ll be — we’re going to kind of have to manage this to where the market’s at, but again our strategy has been pretty clean coming into this. So we’ll see how the next few quarters play out.

Rick Brooks — Chief Executive Officer

And I’d just add again, the comment Chris made earlier Corey that the fact that again we don’t drive our private label to any particular target customers take us there and they’re telling us at this point that the private label was important to them, of our collection of private label brands. So we’re seeing that tick up. And so, obviously we’ll be following our customer there too in terms of which will be a good thing from a margin perspective for the business.

Corey Tarlowe — Jefferies — Analyst

Question on the 2Q guide, what’s embedded in the EBIT margin improvement sequentially from 1Q?

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I mean, I think you have a few different things, obviously Q2 historically has been a little more of a profitable quarter than Q1, to start with, I think that’s where you have to originally kind of think through, and then as we think through the second quarter I think we’ve got kind of costs planned a little more appropriately for where they are. We don’t have the event load that we had in the first quarter. As you know, we did our 100K, which is our annual training and recognition events as well as our managers are free in the first quarter, which is 2 of our 3 annual events we normally would have. The first of those in January, so it would fall in the prior year, but just because of safety for our employees and where the pandemic was that we moved into the first quarter. So you’re going to see some movement of costs like that that’s played out in the second quarter and I think overall, that’s going to tell the main story. I think when we think about the second quarter and where earnings is that one of the things we’re really proud of is just how that bridges from the pre-pandemic timeframe. And I think again that maybe speaks to your earlier question around product margin because we have seen really great product margin gains since 2019, as well as how we’ve tried to manage costs to offset some of the other areas where we’ve seen increases, so that’s kind of how we’ve thought about Q2 and obviously, we’ll see how it plays out.

Corey Tarlowe — Jefferies — Analyst

Very helpful. And then just lastly, what’s your expectation around shipping and logistics costs as we move throughout the year?

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, I’ll go ahead and take a crack at this and if Rick would like to add anything. This has been one as we called out in our call versus one of our bigger misses in Q1 where we just saw costs increase at the level that we were not anticipating. And I think you know as we move through the year, we’re hoping there’ll be some moderation of that but also knowing that there has been a lot of supply chain challenges and higher cost there. So we factor that in as we moved into our guidance and how we kind of our high-level guidance for the — I should say, our detailed guidance for Q2 and our high-level guidance for the year that we are expecting there to be continued price pressure on the supply chain. Now to manage that we do — we are working on some things some initiatives internally that can consolidate packaging and decrease some of those costs overall. And then we’re hopeful those will play out but we’ve also factored in a higher cost here for the remainder of the year.

Corey Tarlowe — Jefferies — Analyst

Understood. Thank you very much. Best of luck.

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Thank you.

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Our next question comes from Mitch Kummetz of Seaport Research. Your line is open.

Mitch Kummetz — Seaport Research — Analyst

Yeah, thanks for taking my questions. Hey, Chris, on the categories — I don’t know what call you’re seeing with categories were for the quarter, maybe I missed that. But I guess even more important than that I’m curious how they stacked up versus 2019. I don’t know if you have that?

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Versus 2019, well, I mean, let me start with the quarter, we did see all categories down in the first quarter, as you would expect, hardgoods led the way, followed by our men’s business, our women’s business, our accessories business and then footwear was our our strongest negative. I don’t have them compared to 2019 in front of me today. What I can tell you that that’s a little more of a mixed bag. We have some that are up and some that are down, but overall, we’ve seen in the short term categories down.

Mitch Kummetz — Seaport Research — Analyst

I guess as a follow-up to that some up some down, do you know if hardgoods it was down in the quarter versus ’19 and does your guidance assume hardgoods is down like your sales guidance now, I think is up mid singles on a 3-year, if I did my math correctly. I’m wondering if hardgoods was down in the quarter versus 3 years ago and if the guidance assumes hardgoods is down versus 3 years ago.

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Hardgoods would not have been down versus 3 years ago and I think the way we’re thinking about hardgoods, obviously as you know, had quite a run up until last year and obviously last year right about in Q2, it started to become more challenged, in 2021, was a pretty I tough, tough year for hardgoods, I think if we look at that period of time ’18 into 2020. It went from 10% of the business in ’18 to 19% of the business in 2020. So last year was a 15% of business. So you saw that you know our strategy over the last 10, 20, 40 years is really been to just drive where those dollars are at, but as we came into 2022, we did expect hardgoods to be down. Obviously, we expected the losses to moderate as we move through the year just as we saw a pretty big drop off during 2021. So as we look at Q3, Q4, we’ve already seen pretty large drop-offs in 2021. So our expectation is that we will continue to see in Q2 hardgoods drop and we may continue to see in Q3 and Q4 as well but certainly at a lower level than what we’ve experienced over the trailing 3 or 4 quarters okay.

Mitch Kummetz — Seaport Research — Analyst

And then on — again, I’m kind of working through the math, but again, it looks like on a 3-year you expect sales to be up mid singles, EBIT to be up 16% or so mid teens, call it, which I think gets me to kind of a 9% op margins for the year. I don’t recall if you gave the margin rate for the year. I was hoping you kind of talk through. So I think you said in the past that long-term sustainable op margin is, I think you said like in the low double-digit range. Can you talk about some of the headwinds that are in the margin this year that you think go away over time and if there’s any way to kind of isolate then your impact that they’re having on the year.

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

Yeah, certainly, I think your math pretty much right on from where we’re thinking of the year and as we entered the year, we thought we had the opportunity to maintain double-digit from where we’re at. But obviously with what we’ve seen now through the first quarter and the current trend, we are planning that really high, high single-digit in operating profit dollars — operating as a percent of overall sales, which again would be, as we look back at kind of where we performed here would be pretty high compared to where we were at pre-pandemic. And I think that’s one thing I would just call out even with the annual guidance that we put out there today, while a step backwards from last year. It continues to be our second highest sales in the history of the company and the second highest earnings in the history of the company and as you know, these aren’t always straight lines. But over time, about driving forward. So I think as we look at kind of to your point of just where are we on this op margin, if it is at that 9%., we do continue to believe the long-term we can drive that into the double digits and meaningful above maybe even into the low-teens. So like where does that come from, to your second question, I think there is going to be continued — I think we can continue the margin expansion and while in the short term. We’ve talked about that being a little more compressed. I think long term, we do have initiatives here that we think we can continue to drive here in North America. We believe internationally we have a lot of room to grow there. I think you’re going to see continued leverage up and down the model as we do have a pretty heavy fixed cost business, which is why you see something like in 2021 when we over indexed in sales, you see a pretty strong flow through. And on the flip side here in 2022 as we see a little bit of a pullback in sales, you’re seeing a bigger drop on the bottom line. But I think you’ll see leverage in occupancy and some of those areas will see some of the shipping cost moderate, obviously one of the other areas that has been impactful to us here in the short term has been labor and so I think they will — we’ll see that component. And then the other big piece of driver for us is on the international side. When we look at kind of where we are not only we’ve spoken of product margin, but just on the overall earning side and you’ve got a good feel on kind of where the European businesses. As we stated on this call and other calls, this is a business, it’s losing money not 10s of millions of dollars but millions of dollars and and this will be another big driver for us as we prove that business out and we see that turn, we’ll see a big benefit to our overall bottom line as that turns positive.

Mitch Kummetz — Seaport Research — Analyst

Great. I appreciate all that color. Thanks.

Chris Work — Chief Financial Officer

You bet.

Operator

And I’m showing no further questions. I would now like to turn the call back to management for closing remarks.

Rick Brooks — Chief Executive Officer

All right, thank you all very much for your interest in Zumiez. Again, as we’ve said, here we feel great about where we’re at, we may have a bit of a tough time, not a straight line. But as we all know every time you go through the tougher times we come out stronger and better at the other side. So as always, we appreciate your interest in Zumiez. And we look forward to talk to you again in September. Thanks everybody.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

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