Categories Earnings Call Transcripts, Finance

Old National Bancorp (ONB) Q2 2021 Earnings Call Transcript

ONB Earnings Call - Final Transcript

Old National Bancorp  (NASDAQ: ONB) Q2 2021 earnings call dated  Jul. 20, 2021.

Corporate Participants:

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Brendon B. FalconerChief Financial Officer

Daryl D. MooreChief Credit Officer

James A. Sandgren — President and Chief Operating Officer

Analysts:

Ben GerlingerHovde Group — Analyst

Scott SiefersPiper Sandler — Analyst

Chris McGrattyKBW — Analyst

Terry McEvoyStephens — Analyst

Jon ArfstromRBC Capital Markets — Analyst

David LongRaymond James — Analyst

Presentation:

Operator

Welcome to the Old National Bancorp Second Quarter 2021 Earnings Conference Call. This call is being recorded and has been made accessible to the public in accordance with the SEC’s Regulation FD. Corresponding presentation slides can be found on the Investor Relations page at oldnational.com and will be archived there for 12 months. Management would like to remind everyone that certain statements on today’s call may be forward-looking in nature and are subject to certain risks, uncertainties and other factors that could cause actual results to differ from those discussed. The company’s risk factors are fully disclosed and discussed within the SEC filings. In addition, certain slides contain non-GAAP measures, which management believes provide more appropriate comparisons. These non-GAAP measures are intended to assist investors understanding of performance trends. Reconciliations for these numbers are contained within the appendix of the presentation.

I’d now like to turn the call over to Jim Ryan for opening remarks. Mr. Ryan?

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, and good morning. Starting on Slide 5, we are pleased to share our second quarter results and an update on our recently announced partnership with First Midwest Bank. I would characterize this quarter’s result as right on plan. Adjusted earnings per share were $0.41 when adjusted for specific merger charges, ONB Way cost and debt securities gains.

During the quarter, commercial loans, excluding PPP loans grew nicely at 11%. Our net interest margin was stable. Capital markets and wealth management revenue were stronger and mortgage revenue was down, but consistent with our expectations with a lower pipeline valuation and a smaller gain on sale margin. Expenses were well managed and slightly higher, primarily due to merit increases and higher incentive accruals. Credit quality metrics remained benign. Adjusted return on average tangible common equity was a strong 14.6% and the adjusted efficiency ratio was just under 58%.

During the quarter, we worked hard with our clients on the SBA forgiveness process. 83% of Round 1 loans have been forgiven by the SBA and we have already have 18% of Round 2 loans through the forgiveness process. Most of our reported credit quality metrics improved during the quarter. We have reduced reserves consistent with our modeling as a result of the better than — better expected economic forecast and the massive stimulus programs. We still have approximately 30% of our reserve supported by qualitative adjustments given the higher-than-average level economic uncertainty that exists today. The further we move beyond the pandemic’s economic shock, the more confidence we will have in taking our reserve closer to day one CECL.

A quick update on hiring. We continue to add significant talent during the quarter. The cost of the increased investment talent will start impacting our expenses slightly in the back half of the year. Our talent pipeline remains strong. We have a fantastic story to tell and we have strong interest from new team members wanting to join.

Moving to Slide 6, which contains a quick refresher on some of the more salient details of our merger with First Midwest. I will not bother reading the slide, but I will share that I’m reminded each time that I am with our First Midwest colleagues how much our cultures are aligned and how strong our strategic fit truly is. Additionally, conversations with investors and sell-side analysts confirmed, they understand and agree with our strategic rationale.

Moving to Slide 7. Both companies have a tremendous integration history and experience and our work is off to a good start. We have made the appropriate SEC filings and regulatory applications. Kendra Vanzo and Jeff NewCom have been appointed to lead the merger integration efforts and we have assembled a group of over 350 team members from both companies to help with the integration. We have met with client facing and support team members from both companies, and they’re all excited and engaged. Additionally, the management team, an outside advisor deeply involved in making technology selections, which we hope to finalize this summer. We also expect a special meeting of shareholders to be held in the third quarter for each company. And lastly, despite the ongoing distraction from the pandemic and now our transformational merger, we have remained focused on serving our clients and communities. And I think our results illustrate the success of those efforts.

I will now turn the call over to Brendon.

Brendon B. FalconerChief Financial Officer

Thank you, Jim. Turning to Slide 8. Our GAAP earnings per share of $0.38, while our adjusted earnings per share was $0.41. Adjusted earnings exclude $6.5 million in early merger related charges, $0.7 million in debt securities gains, and the last of our ONB Way related charges of $0.4 million.

Slide 9 shows the trend in commercial loans and the related commercial pipeline and production trends, all excluding the impact of PPP loans. Q2 represents our fourth consecutive quarter of organic loan growth and over that year, commercial outstandings have grown more than $1 billion. Q2 commercial production of $1.1 billion was the second highest on record, resulting in a $250 million increase in outstandings over prior quarter. Commercial activity continues to be strong throughout the footprint and we are heading into Q3 with a very healthy $2.6 billion pipeline.

Turning briefly to pricing. Absolute coupons on new business continues to be impacted by the low rate environment and the high percentage of floating rate versus fixed rate reduction. However, spread and risk-adjusted returns are strong and have remained consistent throughout this rate cycle. The investment portfolio increased slightly in the quarter as deposit growth once again outpaced total loan growth. We are taking a disciplined approach to putting excess liquidity to work in our investment portfolio with new money yields of 1.53% and a portfolio duration well within five years.

Moving to Slide 10. Average deposits increased 11%, while the growth in period end balances that’s moderated. Total cost of deposits for the quarter with a low 6 basis points, a 1 basis point improvement over Q1.

Next, on Slide 11, you will see details of our net interest income and margin. Net interest income increased $1.8 million quarter-over-quarter, largely due to our strong commercial loan growth. Excluding the impact of PPP, net interest income increased $2.4 million, which was slightly better than expectations as the impact of earning asset growth more than offset the decline in asset yields. Net interest margin declined 3 basis points to 2.91% from prior quarter primarily due to the low rate environment’s impact on asset yields. Core margin, excluding accretion and PPP declined just 2 basis points to 2.72%.

Slide 12 shows trends in adjusted non-interest income. Adjusted non-interest income of $51 million in Q2, $4 million lower than the $55 million we recorded in the first quarter. The decline was primarily driven by lower mortgage banking revenue that was partially offset by quarter-over-quarter improvement in all of our other major fee categories. The decline in mortgage revenues reflect the macro headwinds impacting the industry today. While mortgage production was largely flat from Q1, a decline of both the size and value of the secondary pipeline resulted in a $5.6 million decrease in revenue. I would also remind you that Q1 was positively impacted by a $1.2 million recapture of prior year’s MSR impairment charge.

Next, Slide 13 shows the trend in adjusted non-interest expenses. Adjusting for merger charges, only related charges and tax credit amortization, non-interest expense was $121 million. These results were consistent with our expectations and our Q1 guidance.

Turning to PPP loans on Slide 14, you will see a roll forward of those balances, which stood at $721 billion at quarter end. We continue to assist PPP client for forgiveness with approximately 83% of Round 1 and 80% of Round 2 loans formally through the SBA forgiveness process. Unamortized fees on the remaining PPP loans totaled $26 million. We continue to believe that most of the remaining loans will be forgiven and the related fee income recognized in the second half of 2021.

With that, I will turn it over to Daryl to discuss credit.

Daryl D. MooreChief Credit Officer

Thank you, Brendon. As we presented in the past, this quarters Slide 15 reflects the performance of our loan portfolio both on a current quarter and historical trend basis. Total 30-day delinquencies continue their improving trend for a fourth consecutive quarter, falling to 9 basis points at the most recent quarter’s end. As our commercial delinquencies have historically been on the low side, the improvement we have seen over the past several quarters has been concentrated in retail portfolio with lower than historic delinquency rates in the one-4 family residential mortgage, indirect auto and HELOC portfolios.

Government payments and higher levels of savings due to reduced spending during the pandemic have almost certainly been a contributing factor to the lower retail delinquency numbers. While the effect of these payments will diminish over time, many of our borrowers will benefit from the child tax credit payments which began last week and will continue at a minimum at least through the end of the year. With all that being said, these extremely low levels of delinquencies are in my opinion unsustainable in the long run. Net charge-offs continued well contained with the $300,000 on recovery posted in the quarter. While total recoveries were slightly lower than last quarter and at the lowest level posted over the last six quarters, gross charge-offs were less than a $1 million, which led to the net recovery for the period.

Non-performing loans fell for the second consecutive quarter mainly on the reduction of non-accrual loans in the period. As you can see the gap between Old National peers in this particular metric has favorably narrowed over the last several quarters. We continue to perform well in the net charge-offs and nonperforming measurement category with net charge-offs as a percent of non-performing loans being well south of 5% over the last six years. This is, you can see is significantly lower than peer levels over the time period.

As a closing comment I would say that the challenges our borrowers are currently facing are much different than what we might have imagined 15 months ago. On the C&I side, the most significant challenges many of our clients seem to be facing are supply shortages and the lack of dependable adequately trained labor. Additionally, we may see impact on margins going forward with borrowers were unwilling or unable at the present time to pass along higher input cost to customers. On the commercial real estate portfolio front, we think all banks continue to watch to see what long-term impacts the pandemic might have on the retail and office portfolio segments.

With those comments, I’ll turn the call back over to Brendon.

Brendon B. FalconerChief Financial Officer

Thank you, Daryl. On Slide 16 you will see the details of our second quarter allowance, which stands at $109 million, a decline of $4.6 million from Q1. The improving economic outlook and the positive trends in credit quality supporting modestly lower reserve level. That said, we recognize that not all sectors of our economy have recovered and the threat of future COVID related disruption persist. As a result, we believe it is prudent to maintain a larger than normal qualitative reserve until we have greater clarity on the economic outlook. I would also like to remind you that we continue to carry $41 million in unamortized marks from our acquired portfolios. While these marks will not directly offset charge-offs, any remaining mark will accrete through margin upon resolution.

As a wrap of my comments, here are some key takeaways. We are very pleased with the fundamental result in the quarter. Double-digit commercial loan growth led to higher core noninterest income despite interest rate headwinds. Mortgage revenues were down due to pipeline valuation and normalizing margins, while all our other fee businesses posted quarter-over-quarter improvements. Expenses remained well-controlled and our strong credit quality continue to keep credit costs low.

Slide 17 includes thoughts on our outlook for 2021. We ended the quarter with a healthy $2.6 billion commercial pipeline, which supports our favorable outlook on loan growth. This historically low interest rate environment will continue to put pressure on net interest income, which should be mitigated through continued earning asset growth. The PPP loan forgiveness process continued for our Round 1 and Round 2 clients, and we expect runoff of Round 2 balances to occur in the latter half of 2021, and the recognition of most of the related $26 million and unamortized fees to occur at that time. We expect our fee businesses to continue to perform well.

We are encouraged by the momentum in our wealth business and the strong commercial activity should help maintain the high level of performance in our capital markets business. While mortgage revenue will continue to follow industry trends, current production levels and gain on sale margins should support quarterly revenue consistent with Q2 throughout the remainder of the year. Our other fee lines are expected to be stable in the near term. Our outlook and expenses is consistent with our prior guidance. We expect a modest increase in the back half of the year as our efforts to attract top revenue talent picks up momentum.

Lastly, a brief update on taxes. We continue to expect a reduction in the volatility caused by our tax credits, as we worked through the last of the remaining one-year of historical tax credit commitments. In total, we are expecting approximately $5 [Phonetic] million in tax credit amortization for the year with a corresponding full year effective tax rate of approximately 21%.

With that, we are happy to answer any questions that you may have. And we do have the full team here, including Jim Sandgren and John Moran.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Our first question comes from Ben Gerlinger with Hovde Group. Your line is open.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Hey, Ben, good morning.

Ben GerlingerHovde Group — Analyst

Good morning. I just want to start off with just loan growth in January. You guys seemed to have pretty consistently, be both Midwest and National peer growth trends over the past, call it — let’s call it four quarters or so. I know you guys have done a great job getting out in the markets. I was wondering if you could shed a little light on to kind of the secret sauce, if you will? What National is doing to not only exceed peers but also have pretty sustainable growth really for the past four quarters.

James A. SandgrenPresident and Chief Operating Officer

Yeah, Ben. This is Jim Sandgren. I don’t know if there’s any secret sauce. Obviously, we’re a strong relationship bank. We’ve been out calling on customers really for the last 12 months, while many other banks obviously were working from home and so that provided us an opportunity to serve our clients. We brought in a lot of new prospects. I think we’re pretty opportunistic as other banks might have changed kind of their credit stances. So I just think it’s kind of blocking and tackling, being out, helping our customers when they need us. And so that mentality has carried through throughout the year and has certainly helped us as we’ve started the first half of this year. Obviously, pipelines are good for the back half of the year. And so again, I think — I don’t know if there’s any secret sauce. I think the fact that we restructured through the ONB Way and aligned skill sets of our relationship managers with the client needs. I think that’s played a major role as well. But I just think it’s the fact that we are out and building strong relationships and being there for our clients and being opportunistic for those new relationships as well.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Ben, I would just add. It’s all hands on deck. I’m going to spend the next few days in Northern Indiana, I’ll call on clients. So, it’s all hands on deck. We’re all locked arms and we continue to believe we’re doing — building quality relationships for the long-term health and success of our company. And it’s a primary focus of our entire leadership team.

Ben GerlingerHovde Group — Analyst

Okay, great. It was a bit of a softball question. So the harder one would be — your new production yields are a little lower than your net interest margin today. And then even though you have a great deposit base and is very low cost, I was wondering how you weigh continued growth against the net interest margin, everyone you put on should be a little dilutive today, I get out there floating. So I was wondering how you manage balance sheet growth relative to maintaining that NIM?

Brendon B. FalconerChief Financial Officer

Yeah, Ben. This is Brendon. We’ve looked very closely at the pricing. We have very strict risk-adjusted return hurdles for all of our loans. And as I said in my comments earlier, our spreads have held in throughout this rate cycle, they’ve been strong. So you think about that floating rate production today relative to LIBOR, that’s 200 plus basis points over LIBOR for that floating rate reduction I think. So we’ll continue to put on loans at that rate and feel really good about it.

Ben GerlingerHovde Group — Analyst

Okay, great. I will step back and get in the queue.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Ben.

Operator

Our next question comes from Scott Siefers with Piper Sandler. Your line is open.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Scott.

Scott SiefersPiper Sandler — Analyst

Good morning, guys. How you doing.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good. Maybe, didn’t get up as early as some others this morning, but hear from me anyways.

Scott SiefersPiper Sandler — Analyst

Oh, man, you just couldn’t let it pass.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Sorry, Scott.

Scott SiefersPiper Sandler — Analyst

No worries, I’ll get up earlier next time honestly. I’m just thankful that I dialed the right phone number. Let’s see, but thanks for taking the question. Just wanted to sort of follow-up on the environment for commercial lending. I feel like last year you guys capitalized so well on some of your larger competitors, in particular kind of shutting down for the year. To what degree have you noticed that there, especially the larger guys, are they sort of back in the market in a bigger way?. Number one. And then number two, how if at all is that impacting the competitive dynamic as you see it?

James A. SandgrenPresident and Chief Operating Officer

Yeah, Scott. This is Jim Sandgren. There is no question that really everyone’s back in the market now, so competitive pressures are certainly heating up. Again, we’re staying very disciplined as we think about credit structure, but we’re still getting a lot of at-bats. Our pipeline I think remains robust as we pointed out. So still feel good about the back half and there’ll be deals that we’re going to walk away from because there is certainly some structures out there that are getting stretched and that’s okay. But overall, I think clients feel really good about their opportunities to be successful in the back half of the year and into ’22. So it’s always going to be competitive out there and I think we like our chances given our relationship banking model, so.

Scott SiefersPiper Sandler — Analyst

Okay, perfect, thank you. And then I guess just a question on the the merger. President Biden had put out that executive order a couple of weeks ago. Have you guys seen any impact in discussions with regulators on the approval process? I mean, the order has kind of left a lot to the imagination. So just I’m curious how the conversations are going? If there is any change vis-a-vis what you might have thought prior to seeing the order?

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

No changes. No additional feedback from many of our regulators. Obviously, we’re curious. We’re not sure if it applies to us or or maybe our biggest brother out there. So time will only tell as we go through the regulatory approval process, but really no indications of any different, just full steam ahead.

Scott SiefersPiper Sandler — Analyst

Okay, perfect. All right. Thank you guys very much. I appreciate it.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Scott.

Operator

Our next question comes from Chris McGratty with KBW. Your line’s open.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Chris.

Chris McGrattyKBW — Analyst

Hey, Jim, how your doing. I wanted to ask about the bond portfolio given the back down — the move down in rates lately. You obviously have grown it too dramatically, but interested if you’re a bit more cautious about growing that near-term? And maybe what reinvestment rates are today versus the the 153 [Phonetic] that you gave in the quarter? Thanks.

Daryl D. MooreChief Credit Officer

Yeah, so we’ll continue to grow that investment fully to the extent we have excess liquidity that we can put to work in the loan portfolio. New business rates are probably down a little bit marginally from the average for the quarter, but not dramatically so at this point. So we’ll continue to be disciplined and our hope is that we continue to grow loans at the pace of our growing. And as we talked about, the end of period deposits have sort of moderated, that growth has moderated a bit. So hope is that we can continue to drive a better earning asset mix through the back half of the year.

Chris McGrattyKBW — Analyst

Okay. And on the loan growth, historically the origination has been quite granular. I’m interested if any of the growth this quarter was a deviation from that or if it continued.

Daryl D. MooreChief Credit Officer

No, it’s still pretty granular credits. I mean, average loan — new production still continues to grow over time and I think we’re still just a little bit over I think $1 million bucks. So that’s again — that’s grown over the last few quarters, but still fairly granular.

Chris McGrattyKBW — Analyst

Okay. Maybe just one last one for Daryl. I mean, looking at your your slide on the reserve, I’m trying to figure out where reserve is bottomed with the improvement. I appreciate anything around 30% of your reserve is qualitative. But do we get to — do we breached CECL day one this year if the economy continues to improve at the pace of this?

Brendon B. FalconerChief Financial Officer

Hey, Chris. This is Brendon. I’ll take that one. Look, what I will tell you is the — is this credit portfolio is actually a better quality than it was pre-pandemic of day one CECL. That said, we are going to be very, very judicious in bringing that reserve down until we get some clarity around the economic outlook. But as we look forward, that — it’s a possibility. And we’ll measure our portfolio on our CECL reserve based on the model when the time comes.

Chris McGrattyKBW — Analyst

Great, thank you very much.

Operator

Our next question comes from Terry McEvoy with Stephens. Your line is open.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Terry.

Terry McEvoyStephens — Analyst

Hi, good morning, everyone. Maybe the first question, your outlook for expenses. You talk about the investment in new revenue generating talent positions. I’m just wondering if you could expand on certain markets where you’re hiring talent and what areas of the bank?

James A. SandgrenPresident and Chief Operating Officer

Yeah, Terry, this is Jim Sandgren. We’re really focusing really on primarily on wealth, in commercial, and we’ve added some really good talent in both those areas and up in the Minnesota region. We’ve added some talent in our loan production office there in St. Louis as well. Recently added some great talent [Indecipherable]. It’s really across across the footprint. We’re being again opportunistic. When we can find great talent, we’re adding them to the team and we’re going to continue to do that.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

I would also add we actually put a couple of key hires in our IT and data areas here recently to which — the function of us getting bigger. I suppose you’re getting better at some of those technology needs and so — while it’s a much smaller part of the total we are investing in some key support areas as well.

Terry McEvoyStephens — Analyst

Thanks. And then maybe a Jim Ryan a question for you. What’s been the feedback from your customers, in say Michigan, Indiana, in the Twin Cities where there’s just no overlap with First Midwest. I’m just curious from their perspective is there any reason for them to expect or worry about change at all? Or are they may be excited about the merger given what it could bring to the table?

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, I think by large I would guard characterizes the team members and our clients are excited about the prospects of just being bigger, being able to bring more product to the table, more services to the table. I think everybody’s kind of generally excited, and obviously we don’t know if there’ll be any impact to those individual clients. But I think generally everybody is really excited about the prospects of just being — having a bigger balance sheet as well.

Terry McEvoyStephens — Analyst

All right. Thank you.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Terry.

Operator

Our next question comes from Jon Arfstrom with RBC Capital Markets. Your line is open.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, Jon.

Jon ArfstromRBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Hey, good morning, good morning. Couple of follow-ups. Terry’s question on some of the new hires and you’re flagging that as maybe some, a bit of an expense headwind later in the year. How material do you expect the hiring to be in terms of the expense impact?

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. Not material. I’m thinking about $1 million to $2 million range per quarter. Its pretty consistent what we said. You know, as we were heading into the year about building that type, that pipeline of talent, $1 million to $2 million approximately.

Jon ArfstromRBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Okay. Brendon, question for you or maybe Jim on the deposit growth slowing a bit, its a little bit different than peers, kind of like your loan growth was a little bit different than peers. But what do you think that is for you? And does that potentially make you a little more optimistic on the ability to hold the NIM later in the year if this continues?

Brendon B. FalconerChief Financial Officer

Yeah, we’ll see. I think the excess liquidity has been sort of certainly outside of control on the chart largely driven by stimulus. So I know Jim and the team are still after their gathering deposits. Its still a focus of ours. But I think the stimulus generated excess liquidity seems to be not moderating at least in our footprint, in our portfolio today. And as I talked about earlier, I do think it will be helpful to margin as we are able to put that — put that back to work in the loan portfolio rather than the invest portfolio.

Jon ArfstromRBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Okay. And is it too simple to say that maybe some of your commercial clients are using some of their deposits and you’re seeing some of this may be pulled through in terms of loan growth? Or is it just the stimulus slowdown?

Brendon B. FalconerChief Financial Officer

Yeah, I think the core deposits still did grow quarter-over-quarter, just not at a rapid pace that they grew before. And actually our business deposits actually grew more than our retail deposits this last quarter. PPP funds are starting to get drawn down a bit, but we’re still holding a lot of PPP money still on deposit today.

Jon ArfstromRBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Okay. And then Daryl one for you. You touched on commercial real estate, retail and office. Just any changes in terms of your thinking there? Any new concerns or any information you can share?

Daryl D. MooreChief Credit Officer

No Jon, I don’t think they are. I think that has to play out as leases expire, right? So you’ve got people in those — in the office buildings today and in the retail structures that are still paying lease payments. The real decision making comes when those leases expire and what they do. Do they vacate those buildings? Do they renegotiate much lower rates? So we’re all concerned about watching it. But I think we still got probably 12 months, 24 months before that all kind of plays out and we see the trends.

Jon ArfstromRBC Capital Markets — Analyst

All right. Thanks for the question — or the answers. I appreciate it.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Jon.

Operator

[Operator Instructions] Our next question comes from David Long with Raymond James. Your line is open.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning, David.

David LongRaymond James — Analyst

Good morning, everyone. First question is related to credit and maybe this is more for Daryl. But as you were going through the process, the due diligence process with First Midwest, I’m sure you got to look at a lot of their loan book. Are you having constant discussions with them pre-closing about the loan make up and how they’re thinking about their ratings? Or is that something that wont really happen until after the deal closes?

Daryl D. MooreChief Credit Officer

Yeah, David, Daryl. We’re not having extensive conversations only because as the two banks put their their books together, there is very, very little difference in the way we approach loans and the way we look at risk. And so the the transition with the two banks is going to be probably as easy as any merger, we’ve done a partnership we’ve been up at this point in time. So we’ll get policies together. We’re looking at those. We’re tweaking those. We’re communicating a lot. But there is not a lot of kind of arm wrestling about you’re doing this right, you’re doing this wrong, it’s just pretty much the same.

David LongRaymond James — Analyst

Got it. Thank you, Daryl. I appreciate that. And then as far as IT spending goes, in the near-term prior to the close of the deal, do you guys adjust how you’re spending or how are you thinking about spending? And then any changes in your longer-term spending strategies once the deal gets closed?

Brendon B. FalconerChief Financial Officer

Hey, David, this is Brendon. No, I think as we talked about on the call, I think both banks had really robust IT roadmap. We’re going to continue to complete those roadmaps and make incremental investments where it makes sense as the time goes, but no material change in the run rate of our IT spend has been contemplated. But we think we have plenty of room to to invest in some technologies investments that will be meaningful to the combined organization going forward.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

David, I would jus add that the war for talent will continue on our side. We’re going to continue to ramp up talent in all of our markets and especially doubling down in Chicago and Milwaukee, in places like that. So I would just add that we’re going to continue to invest. I’m convinced that the key to our success and our story resonates really well right now and we’re going to take advantage of that and make sure we invest in a lot of great talent.

David LongRaymond James — Analyst

Got it. Thank you, guys. Appreciate it.

Operator

There are no further questions at this time.

James C. Ryan IIIChairman and Chief Executive Officer

Well, great. Again, we appreciate all your support. And as always, we are here to answer any questions when you have follow-up questions. Have a great day, everyone.

Operator

This concludes Old National’s call. Once again, a replay along with the presentation slides will be available for 12 months on the Investor Relations page of Old National’s website, oldnational.com. A replay of the call will also be available by dialing 855-859-2056. Conference ID code 7447647. This replay will be available through August 3rd. If anyone has additional questions, please contact Lynell Walton at 812-464-1366.

[Operator Closing Remarks]

Disclaimer

This transcript is produced by AlphaStreet, Inc. While we strive to produce the best transcripts, it may contain misspellings and other inaccuracies. This transcript is provided as is without express or implied warranties of any kind. As with all our articles, AlphaStreet, Inc. does not assume any responsibility for your use of this content, and we strongly encourage you to do your own research, including listening to the call yourself and reading the company’s SEC filings. Neither the information nor any opinion expressed in this transcript constitutes a solicitation of the purchase or sale of securities or commodities. Any opinion expressed in the transcript does not necessarily reflect the views of AlphaStreet, Inc.

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