Categories Earnings Call Transcripts, Industrials

Harley-Davidson Inc. (HOG) Q2 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

HOG Earnings Call - Final Transcript

Harley-Davidson Inc. (NYSE: HOG) Q2 2020 earnings call dated July 28, 2020

Corporate Participants:

Shannon Burns — Director, Investor Relations

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Darrell Thomas — Vice President, Treasurer, and Interim Chief Financial Officer,

Lawrence G. Hund — Chief Commercial Officer

Analysts:

James Hardiman — Wedbush — Analyst

Shawn Collins — Citigroup — Analyst

Jaime Katz — Morningstar — Analyst

Gerrick Johnson — BMO Capital Markets — Analyst

Fred Wightman — Wolfe Research — Analyst

Craig Kennison — Baird — Analyst

Brandon Rolle — Northcoast Research — Analyst

Adam Jonas — Morgan Stanley — Analyst

Sharon Zackfia — William Blair — Analyst

Tim Conder — Wells Fargo Securities — Analyst

Colton West — Longbow Research — Analyst

Joseph Spak — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Felicia Hendrix — Barclays — Analyst

Presentation:

Operator

Ladies and gentlemen, thank you for standing by and welcome to the 2020 Second Quarter Earnings Conference Call. [Operator Instructions].

I would now like to hand the conference over to your speaker today, Mr. Shannon Burns, Director of Investor Relations. Thank you. Please go ahead, sir.

Shannon Burns — Director, Investor Relations

Good morning everyone. You can access the slides supporting this call at investor.harley-davidson.com. Click the Earnings Materials box in the center of the page. Our comments will include forward-looking statements that are subject to risks that could cause actual results to be materially different. Those risks include, among others, matters we have noted in our latest earnings release and filings with the SEC. Harley-Davidson disclaims any obligation to update information in this call. Joining me this morning are CEO Jochen Zeitz; Interim CFO Darrell Thomas; and COO, Larry Hund will also be joining for Q&A.

Jochen, let’s get started.

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you, Shannon and hello everyone. We continue to face challenges during these unprecedented times. But as The Rewire is implemented, I’m very pleased with our accomplishments so far. COVID-19 continues to challenge us personally and professionally. Our dedicated workers have returned to our production lines and our priority is keeping everyone safe. We recognize that life and work will be far from normal for as long as the virus poses a significant threat. Recent events have also renewed our commitment to stand up for inclusivity and equality. Through this new reality, our team has pulled together extraordinary ways, making significant progress towards the goals of The Rewire and our future success. We are encouraged by the positive feedback from key stakeholders and the early impacts we are already seeing in the marketplace.

I would first like to provide an update on our ongoing actions in response to COVID-19. First and foremost, the health, well-being and strength of our community continues to be at the forefront. We have diligently implemented and are constantly fine-tuning our protocol to keep workers safe in our factories. We expect most non-production workers to continue working from home until the end of the year.

Second, as I said last quarter, we are executing prudent cost saving measures and expect to deliver $250 million in cash savings, excluding restructuring charges this year. Additionally, discretionary share repurchases continue to be suspended, and we will pay Q3 cash dividend of $0.02 per share, in line with our Q2 dividend.

Third, we have further strengthened our strong liquidity position with nearly $4.7 billion at the end of the quarter. In Q2, we secured an additional $3.3 billion of liquidity. And finally, throughout the second quarter, we provided significant help to ease the burden on dealers and riders, by providing dealer support, based on the unique needs of each region, including financial support for motorcycle inventories, extending certain cash payment due dates and adjusting requirements for warranty and training. To help our riders, we also extended payment terms for those who requested assistance.

At the end of the quarter, about 93% of our global dealers were open for retail motorcycle sales following pandemic interruptions. Three months ago, I have shared with you that significant changes were necessary. Complexity needed to be dramatically reduced. Goals set needed to be achievable and realistic. Our strategy had to be refocused to better align with our capacity and capabilities, and also our new reality, focusing on what makes a difference and nothing else. We also needed to reignite the soul of Harley-Davidson and strengthen our culture.

Based on the urgency of these realities, we defined areas for immediate attention and created The Rewire playbook. We set out to rewire Harley-Davidson from top to bottom. Our implementation of significant changes has been swift and diligent, which has led to progress on all our priorities. First, our new operating model and organizational structure is now simpler, more focused and will enable faster decision-making across the entire company. Significant work has been done across all areas of our global business to eliminate duplication, inefficiencies and complexity. We’ve taken a hard look at our priorities, the dollars we are spending, and how work at Harley-Davidson is getting done, to align our operating model and cost structure to the current realities of the business, setting us up for long-term stability and success.

Every function, region and country has rebuilt its organization from the ground up to focus on what is essential and valuable. We are simplifying into actions and processes, scrutinizing spending categories, large and small and eliminating activities that are not essential. Here are some examples; we’ve created a new global commercial function, accountable for sales and inventory management across all our product lines, regions and countries. The marketing function has been restructured to maximize our new messaging. Building on our strong brand legacy, we will shift marketing plans to put the spotlight back on the brand, heritage and great product, on events that drive true conversion, on investments that build desirability.

The first brand building approach will be shown in a social media campaign, directed by Jason Momoa, celebrating the shared journey and unrelenting spirit of our Harley-Davidson community during these challenging times, and strengthening the positivity and freedom we all find in riding motorcycles. Harley-Davidson Financial Services is increasing operation support, specialist staffing and collection capabilities and will improve consumer online processing support and better align hours of operation with dealer needs. Manufacturing has been optimized to our future volume needs, while also providing better management of production peaks and valleys throughout the year.

Product development and engineering have been reconfigured to align more clearly with our product priorities going forward. Motorcycle Management, a newly created function, is focused on enhancing our core strength, better balancing expansion into new spaces, and fine-tuning the product portfolio and lifecycle plan. Clear performance criteria will be set, focusing on the most desirable and profitable products, while reducing overall product complexity.

Our new operating model includes a newly created administrative function to support our critical people and stakeholder priorities. This will drive greater efficiency in our facilities and lead our future of work initiative. We plan to add a Sustainability Officer to the team, who will further our commitment to the planet and to society. We’ve merged communications with PR and Investor Relations. This will ensure we’re effectively engaging with our communities internally and externally, providing a cohesive approach with our core messaging and mission.

Finally, digital and IT is being elevated out of the finance organization. We recognize digital technology as a critical priority in the future for Harley-Davidson, as we continue to significantly improve our GIS capabilities. The significant changes to our operating model have not been without painful choices. But these are actions that are necessary to deliver success. The streamlined structure requires approximately 700 fewer positions across the company’s global operations, with approximately 500 employees unfortunately leaving us.

To strengthen our new operating model, we are adding new hires to critical positions and are also filling key roles with our exceptional internal talent. I appointed new leadership and direct reports in all functional areas, including product development and engineering, commercial, [Indecipherable] Investor Relations, legal, motorcycle management, HDFS, HR and the newly created administrative functions. The search for a new CFO is in progress.

Second, our product portfolio and launches have been reset for maximum impact with a fully aligned go-to-market process. We are streamlining our motorcycle models by approximately 30%, with plans to further refine our product portfolio. This enables us to invest in the products and platforms that matter the most, while better balancing our investment in new high potential segments. In this context, we plan to expand our offering of iconic motorcycles, those which most embody the spirit of Harley-Davidson.

We plan to expand our unprecedented market leading touring strength, with the delivery of our first Adventure Touring motorcycle, the Pan America. We see strong potential in Adventure Touring and we launch Pan America globally next year. We will be going to market with an improved launch process, beginning with model year ’21, we will shift our product launch and dealer reveal timing into early Q1, driving demand for products and sales for dealers at the start of the riding season. As we transition this year, we have extended our 2020 model year production through fall and expect model year 2021 bikes will arrive in dealer showrooms early in the new year. We will invest in the new go-to-market capabilities and elevated product launches and investment into our brand, using some of The Rewire savings.

Third we are focused on growth beyond motorcycles, and are building Parts and Accessories and General Merchandise businesses to full potential. The new P&A and GM organizations are now led by expert leaders who are tasked with ensuring each business is aligned to our priority markets and motorcycle strategy going forward. They’ve already laid out initial plans to reset our channel strategy and future product lineup.

For Parts and Accessories. We will better leverage opportunities for customizing our motorcycles at the point-of-sale to drive customer engagement and increased sales for us and our dealers. We also expect to reduce P&A SKUs by at least 15%.

Our General Merchandise business will bring the Harley-Davidson brand to new consumers, while enhancing the overall experience for our riders. We will plan to make strategic investments in new and emerging innovative technology, designed to create apparel that is durable safe, comfortable and stylish. To enhance our focus and reduce complexity, we expect to deliver SKU reductions of at least 25%. Our goal is to deliver a holistic approach in the marketplace, one that brings together our incredible line of motorcycles with General Merchandise and Parts and Accessories, enabling our consumers to truly customize the Harley-Davidson experience.

Fourth, we’ve reset our global business to be more focused. Major changes include concentrating efforts on the highest priority markets, primarily North America, with the U.S. and Canada, Europe and parts of Asia Pacific, and structuring in a way that shifts resources and marketing into the regions for maximum impact in line with our future strategy.

Our new global business structure better aligns our investments with their potential. Going forward, we plan to concentrate our efforts on approximately 50 markets, representing the vast majority of our volume and growth potential. We are evaluating plans to exit international markets where volumes and profitability do not support continued investment. We’ve streamlined our regional offices and created the freedom within a clearly defined framework for countries to make decisions, to drive their business. These in-market teams will be more agile and better equipped to understand consumer needs, provide focused attention to dealers and respond more quickly to local market conditions. We also plan to optimize our dealer network to provide an improved and integrated customer experience.

Lastly, we’ve revamped our approach to supply, demand and inventory management to protect the value and desirability of our brand and products. As our factories reopened, we simultaneously implemented a new approach that is aimed at making the right decisions for the long-term health of our brand. As we’ve worked through The Rewire, it was very evident to me that we had lost our focus on the strength of our brand, in favor of promotional activities, which erode our value and the investment our riders make in our products. We are not willing to sacrifice the strength of our legacy in the quest for pure volume growth going forward. We therefore have revamped our approach to supply and inventory management, focusing on products and initiatives that add value, while significantly reducing discounting price promotions. This drives retail pricing to help preserve the value and desirability of Harley-Davidson motorcycles for its customers and brand.

The outcomes of The Rewire are already significant, which is a testament to the extraordinary work across the organization this year. We are encouraged by the value that is being driven by our new supply and inventory management. On average, new motorcycles we are selling at MSRP in the U.S. In addition, we also saw a meaningful increase in used motorcycle pricing at retail and at auction.

I’m already witnessing a transformation in how the organization functions, with better engagement from our leaders and a change in how we evaluate decisions, more credible expectations and more voices across the business incorporated in the process. I’m seeing better awareness of cost management and ROI, an increased focus on privatization and simplicity along with more accountability and ownership of outcomes.

While many of The Rewire priorities have been executed, we still have a significant amount of work through the end of the year. I believe The Rewire will serve as a strong foundation for a successful future in phase 2 of our company development, our new five-year strategic plan. We intend to build on the foundation of The Rewire and focus all our efforts on Harley-Davidson as the most desirable motorcycle brand in the world. For 117 years, Harley-Davidson motorcycles have ignited desirability and that desirability will form the foundation of our strategy and every aspect of the Harley-Davidson experience into the future. All of the decisions we are making will focus on our customers, enhancing the desirability of our brand, promoting growth, while protecting the value of our iconic products for our riders. Future growth will be targeted and focused to where we can win, and balanced between the categories that drive us today and those that will power our future.

We strive to make riding the perfect remedy during these troubled times, The way to connect with our community and the world outside. To find peace and experience adventure, as one of the few brands in the world that delivers freedom for the soul. We intend to share the first look at our new strategic plan named The Hardwire in Q4.

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And now, I’ll turn it over to Darrell to discuss the financial results of the quarter.

Darrell Thomas — Vice President, Treasurer, and Interim Chief Financial Officer,

Thank you, Jochen. The summary of our Q2 results is on slide 8. Motorcycle segment operating income in Q2 was considerably lower year-over-year, driven primarily by lower shipments, as we suspended global manufacturing during the quarter due to COVID-19. Financial Services’ operating income was down significantly, driven by further adjustments to our provision for loan losses in accordance with CECL, as the pandemic persisted. Consequently, consolidated net income was down versus prior year, EPS reflected a loss compared to the second quarter of last year. Based on restructuring actions taken during the second quarter, charges were $42 million and are expected to result in annual ongoing savings of approximately $100 million.

On slide 9, second quarter worldwide retail sales of new Harley-Davidson motorcycles were down 26.6% versus prior year, primarily reflecting significant dealer closures due to COVID-19. As we noted on our Q1 call at the end of April, nearly 60% of our global dealer network was closed. We saw reopenings begin to occur towards the end of May into early July, and by the end of the quarter, 93% of global dealers have resumed normal operations.

U.S. retail sales in Q2 were down 26.7% versus prior year, as most US dealers experienced some level of COVID related closure or retail sales disruption. EMEA saw a year-over-year decline of 29.8%, down across all markets. Asia Pacific was down 10.2%, driven by declines in Japan and Australia, partially offset by growth in China and South Korea. Latin America saw declines in Mexico and Brazil and finished the quarter down 51%.

During the quarter, U.S. market share of new bike registrations was 38.5%, down 8.1 percentage points, driven by the impact of our new approach to supply and inventory management, growth in segments outside of our stronghold segments increased promotions from our competitors and a decline in fleet sales. Our year-to-date market share in Europe was 7.9%, down 1.1 percentage points versus prior year. While we experienced some slight improvement in our second quarter market share, we were adversely impacted by a better market performance in segments outside of our stronghold segments. We also saw increased price competition across all product segments.

Given the pandemic’s impact and as Jochen already mentioned, we are taking a new approach to supply and inventory management, not focus simply on volume, but on profitable and desirable volume. We’ll continue to aggressively manage the supply of motorcycles into the dealer network, as we manage through the pandemic and beyond as part of our strategy to strengthen the value of our motorcycles. These actions are driving long-term fundamental improvements across our business.

Shipments and revenue are noted on slide 10. Wholesale motorcycle shipments in Q2 were down 58.7%, significantly impacted by COVID-19 related disruptions. Our York factory was closed nearly two-thirds of the quarter and our Thailand factory was closed throughout April. Lower shipments impacted revenue for the Motorcycle segment, which was $669.3 million down 53.3%. Motorcycle family mix shifted from Touring to Cruising versus last year’s second quarter, which reduced average motorcycle revenue per bike. Foreign currency exchange also negatively impacted revenue per bike, partially offset by lower sales incentives and higher pricing.

Gross margin and operating margin detail is presented on slide 11. Gross margin in Q2 was down as a result of lower shipments, product mix, unfavorable foreign currency exchange and higher manufacturing expense, slightly offset by favorable raw materials and pricing. The mix impact was unfavorable by $16.3 million, driven by a higher mix of Cruises and Sportsters versus touring bikes last year, and also a mix of lower margin P&A. Currency exchange adversely impacted margin by $15.4 million, largely due to a stronger U.S. dollar. Margin also reflected lower absorption and productivity related to the plant shutdowns. partially offset by lower tariffs. Operating margin as a percent of revenue for Q2 was down compared to last year, driven by lower gross margin and restructuring costs, partially offset by aggressive cost management driving decreased SG&A.

Second quarter Financial Services segment operating income was $4.9 million, down 93.5% compared to Q2 last year. Net interest income was down $8.3 million, due to higher average outstanding debt, as we increased liquidity in the face of the ongoing pandemic. The Q2 provision for both retail and wholesale loan losses was $64.8 million unfavorable to Q2 prior year. This includes a $71.2 million increase in allowance for credit losses, partially offset by a $6.4 million decrease in actual credit losses. Credit losses were down as a result of lower delinquency and lower repossessions, helped by our offering of payment extensions to certain customers. Credit losses were also down on our inventory management efforts, which fueled stronger motorcycle values at auction, driven by increased demand for used bikes. The allowance for credit losses was up in Q2, as the economy continued to deteriorate through the quarter, due to the pandemic. The adjustments accounts for the current recessionary economic conditions and risk related to the continued and accelerated spread of COVID-19 in the United States. Our allowance reflects the estimated impact of losses over the entire life of loans in our portfolio.

Additional Financial Services segment details are noted on slides 13 and 14. Q2 retail originations were down 10.1% versus prior year, driven by lower new bike sales, partially offset by strong used bike sales by dealers. Harley-Davidson Financial Services market share was up a very strong 3.4 percentage to 59.3%. At the end of the quarter, we had $3.41 billion of cash and cash equivalent and $817 million of liquidity available through bank credit and conduit facilities, for a total available liquidity of $4.3 billion. Cash and cash equivalents remain elevated, as we prudently hold cash in the face of the economic uncertainty.

In Q2, we raised $3.3 billion of liquidity and fixed transactions, supported by the strength of the Harley-Davidson balance sheet. As of Q2, our debt-to-equity ratio was 5.1 to 1, well within our debt covenants, which required debt-to-equity to be no higher than 10 to 1. Our 30-day plus delinquencies were favorable, down 158 basis points, as we lapped start-up inefficiencies related to the implementation of a new loan management system last year. We continue to see customers request payment extensions due to the economic challenges of the crisis. The pace of these requests as much slower than it was in Q1 and the first half of Q2. Customers who have received COVID-19 related extensions, may pose an incremental future risk. However, approximately three quarters of the customers that have received extension, have made a payment on their loan. The Q2 retail credit loss rate was 1.87%, a 5 basis point increase over Q2 prior year.

The remaining Harley-Davidson Inc. financial results are summarized on slide 15. Our quarter end cash and cash equivalents balance was $3.86 billion. Year-to-date, operating cash flow of $610.2 million was driven by lower inventory levels and favorable cash flows from wholesale financing activity, partially offset by lower net income this year compared to last year. Our year-to-date effective tax rate was 3.7% compared to 24.1% last year. The year-over-year decrease in the rate was primarily due to these discrete income tax expenses recorded during the first half of 2020, it should reduce the company’s income tax benefit, expressed as a percent of pre-tax loss.

We believe the charts on slide 16 demonstrate that over time, we are a leader amongst our peers in ROIC, at the Motor Company, and ROE at HDFS, and we are a demonstrated leader in our ability to generate cash. In the second quarter, we paid a quarterly dividend of $0.02 per share. As you will note and as communicated previously, we did not repurchase any of our stock on a discretionary basis in the quarter. As we continue to take prudent actions with our cash, given the uncertainty of the ongoing pandemic, we do not intend to repurchase stock in the back half of 2020.

The Board did approve a Q3 dividend of $0.02 per share. Much uncertainty remains, as we assess the current environment and the pandemic’s impact on the global economy and on our business. And it remains difficult to reasonably forecast our financial performance. Therefore we continue to suspend financial guidance for 2020.

To wrap up the financials, while COVID-19 is impacting our short-term results, as Jochen says, we are confident of the actions we’re taking with The Rewire, will strengthen our business and drive long-term value for our stakeholders.

Now, let’s take your questions.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions]. Your first question is from James Hardiman of Wedbush.

James Hardiman — Wedbush — Analyst

Hey good morning. Thanks for taking my question. So it’s somewhat of an open-ended question with regards to whatever you’ll give us on the retail front, I’m curious what the momentum was within the quarter? Maybe if you could sort of talk through how the dealers that were actually open in the quarter did for month-to-month and then any color on what June looked like and ultimately now that we’re almost at the end of July, how July looks like? So obviously you have different policies on which of those things you want to touch on, but any color you can give us would be really helpful?

Lawrence G. Hund — Chief Commercial Officer

Thanks, James. This is Larry Hund. So if you take a look at sequentially, end of April, we only had about 40% of our dealers open for motorcycle sales. Dealerships then tended to open, as we went throughout May. By the end of May, we had about 80% of worldwide dealers open for motorcycle sales, and then saw additional openings in June, so that there were — by the end of June, you had about 90% worldwide dealers open for sale. So as you can imagine, sales increased sequentially by month, as we went throughout the quarter, obviously June being the strongest month of the quarter. And then as far as July, I would say once again we’ve got most of our dealers open and I would say sales are trending as expected, given our new approach to supply, demand and inventory management.

James Hardiman — Wedbush — Analyst

And I guess if I may, just a follow-up to that last point, trending as expected with the caveat, is the expectation that — now that inventories are significantly lower as a result of the new strategy, that to some degree that has and will continue to limit retail as we move forward?

Lawrence G. Hund — Chief Commercial Officer

So I think as Darrell said we’re not giving — updating guidance here. But clearly I think there is a new approach to balancing supply and demand and inventory management will have an impact on retail sales, as we work to create desirability and some of the benefits of that, that we saw, as we went through the quarter of benefits to retail pricing both for new and used motorcycles and benefits for used motorcycle prices at auction.

James Hardiman — Wedbush — Analyst

Excellent, thanks for the color, guys and good luck.

Operator

Your next question is from Shawn Collins of Citigroup.

Shawn Collins — Citigroup — Analyst

Great, thank you. Hi guys, good morning.

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Good morning Shawn.

Shawn Collins — Citigroup — Analyst

Thank you. I wanted to ask about the SG&A cost savings. I know you laid out that you’ve got $250 million in cash savings. Can you break that out between the capex savings and the annual SG&A savings that are expected, please? Thank you.

Darrell Thomas — Vice President, Treasurer, and Interim Chief Financial Officer,

Yeah. Thanks Shawn for your question. We are not going to break that out any further than what we’ve done on revenue, which is basically, we expect that those savings will be made up of SG&A and capital expenditure reductions, and so that’s at this point, all we’re going to say about the $250 million. I will tell you though that, we are on track to deliver the $250 million that we discussed in Q1. So we’re confident that we’ll be able to deliver that for the full year, and that is before any restructuring charges that we are going to be taking.

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

And to add to that, what Darrell said earlier, is that the restructuring charge we took in the second quarter, we expect to deliver $100 million in SG&A savings. So that gives you some indication.

Shawn Collins — Citigroup — Analyst

Okay, that’s really helpful. Thank you very much. I will get back into the queue. Thanks.

Operator

Your next question is from Jaime Katz of Morningstar.

Jaime Katz — Morningstar — Analyst

Hi, good morning. Thanks for taking my question. I’m curious if you’re willing to give us any insight on the exit of international markets that you’re looking at, if there is any way we can maybe think about quantifying what percentage of shipments that might be? Thanks.

Lawrence G. Hund — Chief Commercial Officer

So won’t give an exact number, but I would say that is a relatively small percentage of shipments — if you take a look at it, as we said, we’re focusing really on about 50 roughly primary markets that generate the vast majority of our retail sales and shipments, we are still evaluating which markets we may choose to exit. But those are markets that generate a relatively modest amount of our sales and a relatively modest amount of our profits.

Jaime Katz — Morningstar — Analyst

Okay. And then I think in the press release, it said the Adventure Touring model was being pushed back. Do you have any comments on the Street 500 model. I think that was set to come out next year as well?

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. At this point, Adventure Touring will be the focus going into next year. As I said earlier, we expect to streamline our product line up by about 30% in terms of model reduction and color reductions. Other product line related decisions, we will be revealing in real time. So it’s not really something we can and want to talk about at this point. But let’s focus on Adventure Touring as an exciting new segment for us going into the new year.

Jaime Katz — Morningstar — Analyst

Excellent. Thank you so much.

Operator

Your next question is from Gerrick Johnson of BMO Capital Markets.

Gerrick Johnson — BMO Capital Markets — Analyst

Hi, good morning. I’m not sure you quantified this, so the $100 million in ongoing savings related to current actions, is that a run rate or is that what you expect this year and how much of that is incorporated in the $250 million that you mentioned earlier?

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Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

That is run rate. But as Darrell said, we are looking as part of the new five-year strategic plan to also reinvest into brand building initiatives. So if you take dollar for dollar, that is correct at the run rate, but with a caveat that we might want to decide on reinvesting and investing more into brand building initiatives.

Gerrick Johnson — BMO Capital Markets — Analyst

Okay. And Jochen, a question for you. You mentioned strengthening the HD culture, in your book, Manager and the Monk, you say that managers should ask themselves this question, which elements of collective memory should be recognized? What must be brought in and what must be discarded? So how would you answer your own question?

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Well read. Well look, we have very dedicated employees and workforce around the world, which is really fantastic. The culture has suffered. The company has seen five consecutive restructurings every year, in order to sort of chase the downward trend in sales, that has affected morale and engagement by our team members around the world, which is totally understandable, and that’s the culture we will need to revitalize I see a huge amount of commitment. Obviously, the last couple of weeks have been tough, because we had to let go of over 500 people, that this is a very difficult thing to do and has its effect on morale too. But overall, I do believe there is an incredible energy and passion for Harley-Davidson to get back on the winning street, and that’s the — that energy and passion, I want to — I’m calling upon by our employees around the world, and I’m certain we will get that and we are seeing already positive changes, despite the difficult environment we are in.

Selectively, as I also mentioned earlier, we are bringing in new talent. We have fantastic talent, but in some areas we are looking to hire and have already brought in new talent into the company. So we are complementing a strong team with new talent from the outside. And I think that’s about it. A lot of the things that didn’t happen are very much down to the way the company was run, the way the structure — the organization was structured, the way the processes were defined, and that’s why this is a really comprehensive reset and rewire of how Harley-Davidson operates in a newly defined operating model and newly defined processes going forward, and that I think will unlock the power of the team that we have in place going forward.

Gerrick Johnson — BMO Capital Markets — Analyst

Okay. Thank you very much for that.

Operator

Your next question is from Greg Badishkanian of Wolfe Research.

Fred Wightman — Wolfe Research — Analyst

Hey guys, good morning, it’s actually Fred Wightman on for Greg. If we just look at the market share figures, particularly in the U.S., I mean that was down pretty significantly year-over-year and this is definitely a transition year. But how do you expect share to trend over the next few quarters? And is there any risk that some of that market share erodes permanently?

Lawrence G. Hund — Chief Commercial Officer

So once again, we’re not giving guidance going out. I think as Darrell talked about right, there were really four things that impacted share here in the second quarter. One, certainly growth in segments outside of where Harley-Davidson primarily competes. Fleet sales, if you think about sales, lot of those tourists come from Europe, and that drives a lot of the fleet market, and certainly that type of travel is — with COVID has really been dramatically reduced. So that had a meaningful impact on Touring.

And then we had — obviously there was a lot of promotion in the market in the quarter, with our whole approach to supply and demand and inventory management, we didn’t do promotion in the U.S. in the quarter. So those are really the big drivers during the quarter, what I would say is that, we think that the positives that came out of our supply, demand, inventory management with increased pricing at retail for new and used motorcycles with increased pricing at auction for used motorcycles in closing that new-used price gap in the long term, is a positive for Harley-Davidson, and that’s going to drive a greater results going forward.

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

And if I may add to what Larry said, I think, look at this way, share is more meaningful, once supply and demand is balanced and until then, it’s really the desirability of the brand, that is more important. And as Larry mentioned, we are not focused simply on volume or share for that matter, we will not oversupply the market and if you look at the past, and what I have experienced. If you look at supply and demand or push and pull model, we want to make sure that demand pulls our sales and we are not pushing products into the market and start promoting our bikes before the season even started. So we are not going to pursue volume at the expense of the right fundamentals of our business, and we will actually define new metrics that will define desirability and Larry had already alluded to some of them that have improved in the last couple of months.

Fred Wightman — Wolfe Research — Analyst

Okay. And maybe just to follow-up on that last point, I mean, dealer inventories in the U.S., down 17,000 bikes, I mean, where is that versus where you would want it to be ideally in sort of your internal plan?

Lawrence G. Hund — Chief Commercial Officer

So I would say, we were down more. Obviously as Darrell said, we had we had plants closed. We were certainly down more at the end of the second quarter. Worldwide inventories were down about 32%, the U.S. was down more than that. So inventory throughout the second quarter was certainly a fair amount lighter than we would like going forward. Won’t give you a specific number, but certainly that amount we were down at the end of second quarter, fair amount lighter than we would expect, and we think is the right measurement for the business. And that has come back, you know as plants have been open and shipping motorcycles on a regular basis.

Fred Wightman — Wolfe Research — Analyst

Great. Thank you.

Operator

Your next question is from Craig Kennison of Baird.

Craig Kennison — Baird — Analyst

Yeah, thanks for taking my question and kudos to Gerrick, and a great question as well. My topic is affordability and kind of demographics, with a premium brand like Harley-Davidson, the focus on scarcity value makes sense. But building that next generation of riders, means that affordability is going to be a factor. What can you do to make that first bike more accessible for the next generation of riders? And is that important?

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, I think affordability has not been a problem in the past. But when your launch prices go down, your MSRP piece goes down, that obviously devalues the value of our bikes, and that’s what needs to be corrected. So when you are making a significant investment into a Harley-Davidson product, you want to make sure that your value is preserved, and it doesn’t deteriorate from the moment you buy the Harley-Davidson product. So I think affordability is relative. Some have said that we want to be exclusive. No, we don’t want to be exclusive. In fact, we want to be inclusive as a brand, but we want to protect the value of our products for our customers, and that is all built around the desirability, which we are managing through different metrics and as part of the next five year strategic plan.

I think demographics, we also need to look at who has been buying Harley-Davidson in the past and who do we expect to buy Harley-Davidson in the future. And quite honestly, I think that we’ve had a more — a rather oversimplified view. Harley-Davidson is for those who share our mission, and we call at the time, this pursuit of adventure, freedom for the soul, and that is regardless of age, and it’s important to remember that the customer targeting is so much more dynamic than actually looking at age. I’ve heard now so often that, our consumer is aging out. Well I’m aging, as they say, and I feel like riding right now. In fact, I would say, consumers are aging into riding, as they have more free time and resources, especially post this pandemic. And so Harley-Davidson is really more about attitude and emotion than age and demographics, and if you look at the data, that actually does show that the people at the age of 30 plus over time age into riding, and that is critical. That is not to say that we will be attracting a lot of teenagers to our brand. That’s just not the focus of our company. But that being said, if you look at engagements or an incidence rate, that’s increased 1.5 times for young adults since 2010 and actually for 50 plus, it has increased over two times since 2010. So that’s a positive.

And if you look then at sales of used and new bikes together, we’ve actually done really well in the second quarter, and that shows that there is huge amount of demand for our product in 2019 alone over 500,000 life riders have purchase new and used bikes. We tend to focus only on new bikes, I think that we need to change. So I’d say affordability by protecting the value of our product, but not certainly by cheapening it and hence focusing on desirability will be the future. Entry models, we will look into, but I will be talking more about that in our five year strategic plan.

Operator

Your next question comes from Brandon Rolle of Northcoast Research.

Brandon Rolle — Northcoast Research — Analyst

Good morning. My question is on the new rider dynamics you’re seeing in the industry. Could you comment on Riders Academy registrations or what you’re seeing? Seems like outdoor power sports industries are seeing new riders. Could you comment on that?

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, I mean. Yeah. COVID-19 certainly has sparked interest, especially in the U.S., but also internationally for outdoor activities, and that is visible in positive sales trends, in particularly bicycles and boats and RVs and other outdoor products. Motorcycling, and Harley-Davidson specifically we believe has and will continue to benefit from this trend, as we’ve said now, taking new and used sales together, we’ve actually seen a slight increase in the second quarter. And yes [Technical Issues] has increased as well. In particular regarding the riding academy, we’ve added two new programs with Experience-To-Ride and Learn-To-Ride, and we actually expect all of our classes to be full for the rest of the year. So we’ve seen a significant increase in our riding academy classes at our U.S. dealerships. And in the long run, in the long term, we believe that an increased interest in outdoor power sport activities, including motorcycles, should then also have a positive effect on Harley-Davidson going forward.

Operator

Your next question is from Adam Jonas of Morgan Stanley.

Adam Jonas — Morgan Stanley — Analyst

Thanks very much. The question just asked was what I was going to ask, but I want to pivot to just, Jochen, how are you seeing morale in the company right now? You’re being refreshingly open with some of the degradation in the company and how it’s hit the culture. But as you’ve been able to reach much deeper into the management of the dealers to the line workers, any anecdotes, thoughts, moods you want to share, as the company kind of comes out of this dark period and kind of maybe can transition from anxiety to some hope?

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

That is a great and very important question. Let me say this, from my perspective, management has been, how should I say removed — too much removed from business and from culture, and that is something that needs to change dramatically. And if I’d meet Managing Director of a relatively important country, and that person has not spoken to 15 years — for 15 years to senior management, there is a problem, right. So first of all, we have to make sure that decision making happens where it needs to happen, and that’s what I tried to say in my speech early on. We need to delegate responsibility out to those who know how to make the right decisions, within a clearly defined framework. So that doesn’t mean that we just delegate, it means that those who know best that run the countries, that run the regions, should be having a clear framework, within which they can make decisions, and don’t have to wait for a leadership to ultimately micro manage in markets.

That’s not going to happen going forward. I think that will have a significant effect on morale. Obviously as I said earlier, it has been a tough couple of weeks, having to let go so many of your colleagues is very tough, and it’s certainly not helping morale. But I do believe based on the feedback I’ve received, that there is a general understanding that this is not a cost cutting exercise. This is really about setting the company up for long-term success. It’s making sure that we have the right operating model, the right people in the right place with the right flow processes, so that we will make the right decisions and become faster and less complex and more focused. And that’s essentially what the focus was. The side effect, the positive side effect is of course that our costs will go down, and that we are adjusting up our cost structure to the new reality. But more importantly to me, we shouldn’t just focus on the cost side, but actually after five years of slicing costs down, actually setting ourselves up for long-term success, but being a much more high-performance company. That is really the focus of The Rewire, and we’ve made tremendous progress.

I’ve been to the factories now except Tomahawk. I visited our Powertrain operation. I visited York and as well, I think more engagement by senior management to understand what’s actually going on in the factories is required, and we’ve gotten and received a lot of positive input that we take into account. I reference to Peaks and Valleys in our production throughout the year. It’s something we need to work at. It’s just inconceivable that you lay off people to then rehire then three months later, that is never good for quality. In the interim, you have to bring in casual workers to fill the gap, not having the same experience and not putting the same focus on quality. So that’s something we need to work on. That’s an area that we are focusing right now. And I think dealers, well, I mean I’ve been in touch with many dealers. In fact I’m reaching out to many dealers in the next couple of weeks virtually, rather than physically with order restrictions on travel that we are still seeing. But I think overall, I’ve only received positive feedback from our dealers so far, that we are making the right decision.

Also Read:  WW Grainger Inc. (GWW) Q2 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

So I do believe anxiety will pass quickly and we are going forward with a lot of hope. But it’s not hope, it’s actually clear plan, it’s a clear strategy, it’s a clear Rewire playbook that we’re executing and that we are communicating on in a much more significant way. I’m communicating personally every week. After this call we have a global seminar for all employees, because it’s important that every step we take is being communicated throughout the organization, to have full transparency, of the good the bad decisions and all the things we can improve. I hope that answers your question?

Operator

Your next question comes from Sharon Zackfia of William Blair.

Sharon Zackfia — William Blair — Analyst

Hi, good morning. Thanks for taking the question. On the $75 million year-over-year decline in SG&A, could you help us understand what if anything in there was unusual related to the coronavirus disruption versus something that might be more ongoing and structurally lower? And then on the HDFS originations, I think they were actually higher than the total company’s revenues. Did you do something different, as related to the used financing within the quarter?

Darrell Thomas — Vice President, Treasurer, and Interim Chief Financial Officer,

Thanks Sharon. So on the first part of the question, on the SG&A side, there is nothing that is necessarily unique from a COVID point of view, except for the fact that people aren’t in the office and therefore they’re not spending to the same extent that they would be otherwise. And obviously we’ve put a hiring freeze in place and that helped drive down the SG&A that that you’re seeing. So the $76 million is really part of the promise that we made with respect to the $250 million commitment, and it’s just coming through those all lines of SG&A. We’re not traveling. We’re not spending money and we had a hiring freeze. There is nothing unique to COVID that I could point to.

So with respect to HDFS, yes, their performance was better and it was driven by used. However, there were no promotions. I think it all goes back to the supply and inventory strategies that we’ve been taking, that we talked about already, that are basically creating a demand for used bikes better being sold through our dealers, HDFS is well positioned to finance those bikes, and as you can see, their performance was stronger than the Motorcycle segment. So again, it’s all part of the whole supply and inventory management process, and we’re seeing it play out at HDFS, through strong originations of use. There was no promotions, nothing special about financing used, except for those where the opportunities were.

Operator

Your next question comes from Tim Conder of Wells Fargo Securities.

Tim Conder — Wells Fargo Securities — Analyst

Thank you. Jochen, if I may, one for you and one for Larry, whoever wants to take this. On the new-used spread, can you kind of just give us a reference point where that was at the end of Q2 versus a year-over-year basis and maybe a long-term average. So it’s maybe for Larry. And then, Jochen, looking at the part of The Rewire, are you looking in any way at changing, especially North America, the replenishment profiling regional areas of dealers and maybe changing what their stocking base is and how that’s replenished, as part of The Rewire or The Hardwire maybe program?

Lawrence G. Hund — Chief Commercial Officer

Okay. So on the new-used spread, obviously there was a lot more used motorcycles in the market than new. But it’s probably about one-third, two-third split roughly, third new, maybe two-thirds used.

Tim Conder — Wells Fargo Securities — Analyst

I guess Larry from the pricing differentials, as that narrows obviously back to, if you have better value for the consumer, it holds the value better, doesn’t depreciate right out of the dealer floor as much, that precipitates just long-term value interest in the brand, what you guys are talking about — yeah?

Lawrence G. Hund — Chief Commercial Officer

What we saw was probably, I will give you two things on that. We saw used pricing increase about 6% throughout the quarter. Certainly higher than we’ve seen in any previous quarter for a good while. If you look at the auctions, we probably saw — as you went through the quarter, not for the entire quarter. As you went through the quarter, as auctions kind of opened up back in May and June, we saw that comparable bikes were going for roughly about 10% more, than they were previously. So that gives you a couple of benchmarks in the way used pricing solidified in the second quarter.

Tim Conder — Wells Fargo Securities — Analyst

And then just sort of where that is versus the long-term or where you want it?

Lawrence G. Hund — Chief Commercial Officer

Obviously, anything that closes that gap is good. Certainly, I think that — those are levels that we haven’t seen in quite a while, Tim. So I think that — we think that’s a lot of momentum in the right direction. Obviously, if it closes more, that would be great. I don’t think we have a benchmark on that. We clearly think that having that gap be less, is a good thing, as far as Jochen said, as far as used motorcycles retaining their value, and a customer feeling like they could buy a new motorcycle, that depreciation curve isn’t going to be as steep as it was in the past.

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah. And Tim, to your other question, as I said, balancing supply demand and healthy inventory levels is key, and that applies to the U.S., it applies to all of the markets around the world, because we have quite a dense dealer network in the United States in particular, that has even more importance and hence there is a lot of focus on our new SD&I management process, as we call it now. So inventory management will sit with the commercial function and the responsibility will sit with the commercial function, and hence that is something that has actually changed. Inventory management was in the past a responsibility and accountability, were not with the people that ultimately called on the inventory. That’s a problem that we needed to fix.

In terms of replenishment, yes of course that automatically has an effect on how we replenish. But I think there are also some other factors that we should bear in mind, and that is, that we also want to make sure that inventories are right throughout the network, and that means that if some dealers have too much of one model or product, that they also start trading among each other. So unlocking trade among dealers, I think is something that will also help to improve our inventory overall, throughout the network. And what we also don’t want to do, is have our dealers compete with each other on price. As I said, price, promotions and discounting has to be reduced and will be significantly reduced, and that doesn’t only apply to us, but we hope certainly that by doing the right things with The Rewire and our advisory strategic plan, that our dealers will follow suit and stopped competing with themselves from time-to-time, if they think it’s needed and rather focus on our competition, than looking at our fellow dealers as competitors. I think that’s something that we also need to address and they actually need to address going forward.

Operator

Your next question is from David MacGregor of Longbow Research.

Colton West — Longbow Research — Analyst

Hi, good morning. It’s Colton West on for David. Thanks for taking my question. Are you guys still planning to move forward with the small displacement like in Asia? And if so, can you give us an update on the progress there?

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

As I said, we would like to reveal our products much closer to actual launch. And whether and when we are going to launch specific products, is not something that I would like to elaborate on right now. We will provide further detail in the fourth quarter. At this point, there’s really nothing new to say about that.

Operator

Your next question is from Joseph Spak of RBC Capital Markets.

Joseph Spak — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Thanks, good morning everyone. Two questions; one, I was wondering if you could give us an update or a sense of how much plans or I guess line consolidation can occur, as you get your capacity to align with your new gopher view [Phonetic] of the company’s opportunity. Maybe how that compares to 2019 levels? And then secondly, most like U.S. inventories down maybe 40% or so year-over-year, but there were some reports that I think you wanted lower, maybe 65%. So, do you still plan to under-ship in the back half?

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Are you referring to our manufacturing capacity or you’re referring to our…

Joseph Spak — RBC Capital Markets — Analyst

Yeah, sorry. Manufacturing capacity. Yeah.

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, we have adjusted our manufacturing capacity to our expected volumes going forward with all the uncertainties obviously that surround the pandemic. But we’ve taken the necessary measures to align our manufacturing capacity. So I think we are pretty much set, assuming that what we see in the foreseeable future, are quantities that we’ll realize. But we have taken, I would say, a realistic conservative approach.

Lawrence G. Hund — Chief Commercial Officer

And Joseph, the second part of your question as far as shipping in the second half of the year, as Darrell said, we’re not providing guidance, but I think there are some things you should consider, as far as your forecasts are concerned. Combination of factors that are going to impact shipments, ultimately revenue in the back half of the year, most significantly as we said in the call, re-timing of our new model year delivery to early Q1 from historically, that’s been late August, right? So that is going to have certainly an impact on both shipments and retail sales, as far as the timing of that is concerned. I’d say, as we’ve mentioned several times on the call, our new approach to supply and inventory management, in line with demand to drive value and desirability, that’s going to continue through the rest of the year, and then into next year. And then we did mention, we are looking at exiting certain markets, smaller volumes, things like that, and we’ll probably have some continued dealership closures throughout the rest of the year in the back half, so that will probably have an impact as well.

And then finally, there’s the uncertainty of COVID-19 potential of additional disruptions that’s hard to predict at the moment, but that could certainly have an impact. So hopefully that gives you some direction I guess as to things that could influence shipments during the back half of the year.

Operator

Your final question comes from Felicia Hendrix of Barclays.

Felicia Hendrix — Barclays — Analyst

Hi. Good morning and Jochen, as a final question, it’s kind of big picture. So given there is a broad and sweeping program, but stepping back, if you had to prioritize the top three issues that Harley had, what would they be? And what do you think the customer wants, that Harley is not delivering?

Jochen Zeitz — Chairman, President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, I’m afraid three is not enough. So, I have to ask you to go back to everything I said. I think everything that is part of the playbook is really important and I wouldn’t want to highlight anything other than maybe say that, without a proper operating model and without the right people in place, the right organization structure, you can succeed. So that’s complete and we will move forward now focusing on other areas of The Rewire which we’ve already addressed and already have taken significant actions, but more to come until the end of the year.

We give customers what they want. I would say we do. We have extraordinary product and we have more product in the pipeline. But the complexity of our product offering has just been quite substantial, and sometimes it’s even hard to know what product is what and that complexity I think might even be for some customers a bit confusing at times, especially for those who come into the brand, and would like to buy a new bike. That is not a huge problem, but it certainly is something that makes our lives from a product development and investment point of view, more difficult. And that’s also one of the reasons why we don’t want to just launch into every category at once, but want to be very focused on the ones that are true to Harley, that our customers are looking for and that are not too much of a brand stretch. You can’t be everything for everybody. We are an extraordinary and desirable brand, but that doesn’t mean that we ever want to become everything for everybody. So that desirability needs to be retained and needs to be reflected in the products we offer, and the categories we launch ourselves into, if they are not part of the offering today.

Shannon Burns — Director, Investor Relations

All right. That wraps up our questions for today. Thank you everyone for joining us and hope you have an outstanding day.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

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