Categories Earnings Call Transcripts, Technology

Xilinx Inc. (XLNX) Q2 2021 Earnings Call Transcript

XLNX Earnings Call - Final Transcript

Xilinx Inc  (NASDAQ: XLNX) Q2 2021 earnings call dated Oct. 21, 2020

Corporate Participants:

Matt Poirier — Senior Vice President of Corporate and Business Development and Investor Relations

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Brice Hill — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Analysts:

Ross Seymore — Deutsche Bank — Analyst

Aaron Rakers — Wells Fargo — Analyst

Ambrish Srivastava — BMO — Analyst

Tristan Gerra — Baird — Analyst

Tom O’Malley — Barclays — Analyst

William Stein — Truist Securities — Analyst

Christopher Rolland — SIG — Analyst

Kevin Feeney — Evercore ISI — Analyst

Matt Ramsay — Cowen — Analyst

Michelle Waller — Needham & Company — Analyst

Srini Pajjuri — SMBC — Analyst

Chris Caso — Raymond James — Analyst

Presentation:

Operator

Good afternoon, my name is Rob and I will be your conference operator. I would like to welcome everyone to the Xilinx Fiscal Second Quarter 2021 Earnings Release Conference Call. All lines have been placed on mute to prevent any background noise. After the speakers’ remarks, there will be a question-and-answer session. [Operator Instructions] I would now like to turn the call over to Matt Poirier. Thank you, Mr. Poirier, you may begin your conference.

Matt Poirier — Senior Vice President of Corporate and Business Development and Investor Relations

Thank you and good afternoon. With me are Victor Peng, CEO and Brice Hill, CFO. We recognize there have been a number of recent reports regarding a potential M&A transaction with Xilinx. Our policy on M&A rumors is to neither comment nor answer questions about them and we will abide by that policy with respect to these reports. The purpose of today’s call is to discuss our most recent quarterly results and outlook and we would ask that questions be limited to these topics.

Let me remind everyone that during our conference call today, we may make projections or other forward-looking statements regarding future events or the future financial performance of the company. We wish to caution you that such statements are predictions based on information that is currently available and that actual results may differ materially. We refer you to the documents the company files with the SEC including our 10-Ks, 10-Qs, and 8-Ks. These documents contain and identify important risk factors that could cause the actual results to differ materially from those contained in our projections or forward-looking statements. In addition to GAAP financial measures, we will be disclosing certain supplemental non-GAAP financial measures used by management to evaluate the company’s financial results.

We provide these measures to facilitate period-to-period comparability for purposes of evaluating continuing business operations by excluding the effects of non-recurring and unusual items such as amortization of intangibles and certain one-time items related to acquisitions. We believe that sharing these non-GAAP measures will be helpful for analysts and investors in analyzing the company’s ongoing core business. A reconciliation of non-GAAP financial information to the closest GAAP measure is included in our earnings release and has been posted on our Investor Relations website. This conference call is open to all and is being webcast live. It can be accessed from our Xilinx Investor Relations website. Let me now turn the call over to Victor.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Thanks, Matt and thanks everyone for joining today’s call. I hope you and your families are healthy and well. Let me now briefly touch on how we’re operating with the ongoing COVID-19 challenges before I discuss the business. Our supply chain and development activities have continued without much disruption. Most of our employees continue to work from home except in China where employees have been allowed to return to work. And we’ve continued to progress on our strategy despite approaching eight months of largely working from home. Overall, our teams are doing an outstanding job executing and delivering for our customers.

Now on to the business highlights. Fiscal Q2 revenues grew 5% sequentially and were $767 million, higher than the midpoint of our guidance. DCG performed better than expected and had a record quarter. Wired and Wireless revenues were slightly better than expectations. In the core businesses, AIT revenue grew sequentially. Our A&D business was strong as expected, but offset somewhat from lower than expected TME revenue due to some emulation revenue shifting into Q3. ABC performed significantly better than expected with the auto business showing signs of recovery. The advanced products category constituted 70% of total revenues. Zynq-based revenues increased 28% compared to the prior quarter and were 22% of the company revenues. Our Zynq SoC design momentum continues to strengthen across our target markets and we’re confident that SoC revenue will be a much larger portion of our overall business in the future.

Now, I’ll move on to business specific highlights starting with DCG. We saw strong growth in our DCG business during the quarter with revenues crossing the $100 million mark for the first time. Cloud service provider deployment of Alveo-based compute AI clusters and Solarflare NIC adapters contributed significantly to this growth. DCG customer traction continued to grow in Q2 including a marquee SmartNIC design win with a Tier 1 U.S. hyperscaler. This win is expected to realize well over $100 million in annual revenues by FY ’24. Notably, we won against several of the other top market players mainly due to the unique value we deliver with our adaptive SmartNIC hardware and our stronger software capabilities from our Solarflare acquisition.

Turning to other customer engagements and design win activity, we see growing 100-gig SmartNIC engagements with hyperscalers and proof of concept activities for 200-gig solutions. In compute acceleration, there’s great interest in an RT Video Server and we have multiple FinTech customers’ engagements in banking and electronic trading exchanges. Finally, in storage, we saw the next-generation storage platform commitments from new customers.

With respect to our progress in our platform software and ecosystem development, we’ve had close to 43,000 downloads of Vitis since announcing it late last year. To date, we’ve trained over 15,000 developers and have over 1,000 software partners releasing a growing list of applications. We’ve also made progress with the AI developer community and have 50 AI application examples open sourced on the Xilinx GitHub account.

Moving to WWG, as expected, we saw a significant revenue contribution from one of our Tier 1 OEM customers that is ramping our RFSoC to production this quarter. These RFSoC deployments are for sub-6 gigahertz massive MIMO radio deployments in North America. Our design win pipeline for RFSoC continues to expand globally. We’re also beginning to see revenues from a Tier 1 customer who is using our 7 nanometer Versal ACAP and we expect further revenue growth when deployment starts in 2021. As 5G deployments begins to ramp in more geographies, we are very well positioned to benefit from the significant increase in deployed radio units especially in massive MIMO configurations. Our product leadership with RFSoC and Versal ACAP and the value that these adaptive SoCs provides our customers are unique in the industry.

We’re also offering customization of our products to optimally meet our customers’ cost, power, and form factor requirements by harboring [Phonetic] selective IP while maintaining our unique adaptive capability. We’ll share more details about this in upcoming announcements. We also made great progress in the Open-RAN space where we see a big opportunity over the next several years. We’re working with key stakeholders to drive O-RAN initiatives to ensure 5G and future networks be openly developed, interoperate, and adaptable. As I mentioned last quarter, we are a member of both the Open RAN Policy Coalition and O-RAN and have contributed to the 3GPP specifications for 5G mobile networks.

Our products empower our customers to innovate and gets to market with a differentiated and custom solution faster than any other option. This unique capability will accelerate realizing the promise and performance of massive MIMO and O-RAN. Last quarter, we announced a Tier 1 telco accelerated card for O-RAN distributed units and virtual baseband units in 5G networks. Customer interest continues to be solid in this area with positive feedback from market leaders like Nokia and Mavenir. Vodafone recently identified Xilinx as a technology front-runner in the massive MIMO category for Open-RAN enabled radio unit hardware products. In addition, KMW recently announced that it has selected Xilinx as their strategic partner and silicon supplier for the company’s base station radio equipment business.

Moving now to the core markets, I’m delighted to say that we’re very close to being back to our pre-COVID-19 business level and poised to resume growth. As you know, our core markets are diversified and provide a highly resilient foundation for our overall business. Our core markets provide significant and consistent cash generation to support reinvestment in these markets as well as in our strategic initiatives. Aerospace and Defense business grew in the quarter and set a new record. We expect this business to be a secular growth driver in the long-term with some lumpiness from time to time. Global defense budgets are generally trending up and we see emerging technologies like hypersonics and increasing adoption of AI. During the quarter, our 20-nanometer radiation tolerant Kintex UltraScale FPGA received a platinum honor from the 2020 Military and Aerospace Electronics Innovators Award in the interconnect technology category.

The industrial business is recovering which is consistent with the recent manufacturing PMI data and our leadership in E&P remains very strong. We recently announced the world’s largest FPGA the VU19P, which is in production. With 35 billion transistors, the VU19P provides the highest logic density and I/O count on a single device ever built. The VU19P sustains our product leadership in the emulation and prototyping market that was established with our 28 nanometer generation of products.

We saw a recovery in the auto market over the last quarter though it’s not quite back to our pre-COVID run rate. We expect this trend to continue into the second half of the fiscal year. We had several design wins in ADAS as well as in DMS where we are a leader. Subaru selected Xilinx to power its new-generation EyeSight system debuting with the Subaru Levorg in Japan. Our Zynq MPSoC will be powering their next-generation ADAS system to offer features like automatic emergency braking, adaptive cruise control, and lane keeping assist. We also announced with Continental, the world leader in automotive radar systems, that our Zynq products will be powering their advanced radar systems. Continental has the industry’s first production-ready 4D Image Radar that can support Level 2 to Level 5 autonomous driving. We expect the auto market to resume robust long-term growth as the industry continues to recover and adoption of ADAS grows. Now let me turn it over to Brice.

Brice Hill — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Thank you, Victor. As Victor mentioned, we had a solid Q2 with broad strength across many of our end markets. This strength drove total revenue of $767 million, above the midpoint of guidance we provided on our Q1 earnings call and 5% higher than our previous quarter. By end market, the Data Center Group revenue grew 23% quarter-over-quarter and 30% year-over-year driven by continued build out of an AI Compute Cluster at a cloud service provider and ongoing strength with our Solarflare products. Note, we prioritized our orders to comply with the most recent trade restriction rules which resulted in a significant outperformance. Without the impact of these additional trade restrictions, DCG revenue would have come in approximately flat to Q1 as originally expected.

Wired and Wireless Group revenue decreased 13% quarter-over-quarter and 36% year-over-year. The expected sequential decline was due largely to the CIV related order acceleration seen in Q1. Wired performed ahead of expectations while wireless business was largely in line with expectations. Wired outperformance was driven by ongoing access network build outs as well as some benefit from the recent trade restrictions. In wireless, we saw a healthy ramp of our RFSoC product with a Tier 1 OEM for 5G deployment at a North American operator.

Across our core markets, encompassing our AIT and ABC groups, revenue grew 10% quarter-over-quarter and 5% year-over-year driven by improving business conditions across multiple end markets. More specifically, ABC or Automotive, Broadcast, and Consumer revenue increased 36% quarter-over-quarter and declined 8% year-over-year with a strong rebound during Q2 in the automotive end market with meaningful improvement across multiple Tier 1 OEMs. Solid broadcast end market performance during Q2 came in line with expectations. AIT or Aerospace and Defense, Industrial and Test & Measurement revenue increased 3% quarter-over-quarter and 11% year-over-year with strong performance in Aerospace and Defense, which delivered a record quarter. ISM performed as expected while TME results were less than expected due to an emulation customer program that started in Q2 and is now expected to extend into Q3.

Now some other financial highlights and metrics. Company level gross margin was toward the high-end of guidance with GAAP gross margin of 70.7%. The performance was primarily driven by end market mix and lower costs. GAAP operating expenses of $336 million or 44% of revenue were within our guidance range. Higher sequential operating expenses were driven by higher bonuses due to our first half profitability and our salary increases in July. GAAP operating income was $205 million or 26.8% operating margin. Our GAAP tax rate was 0.4%, in line with guidance. Note, our lower fiscal Q2 tax rate is driven by a tax benefit associated with the vesting of appreciating stock awards. GAAP net income was $194 million and diluted earnings per share was $0.79, a 108% quarter-over-quarter increase and 11% year-over-year decrease. Diluted share count increased quarter-over-quarter to 246.8 million shares.

On a non-GAAP basis, gross margin was 71.5%, operating expenses were $332 million, operating income was $216 million, tax rate was approximately 1%, net income was $203 million, and non-GAAP diluted EPS was $0.82, a 26% increase from Q1 and a 13% decrease year-over-year. Note, the difference between our GAAP and non-GAAP is due to M&A related expenses and amortization and related income tax effect of non-GAAP adjustments.

On to balance sheet and cash flows, total cash and short-term investments increased $100 million to $3.1 billion in the quarter and our total debt remains $2 billion. Accounts receivable increased to $362 million and 43 days compared to 38 days last quarter. The days sales increase was driven primarily by linearity of shipments. Inventory decreased to $282 million and days of inventory stood at 114 days, same as the prior quarter. We generated $248 million in operating cash flow or 32% of revenue and $232 million in free cash flow or 30% of revenue. During the quarter, we paid dividends of $93 million. Through the first half of fiscal 2021, we have returned a total of $239 million or 52% of free cash flow through both dividends and share repurchases.

Turning now to the outlook for fiscal third quarter 2021. We expect third quarter revenue to be between $750 million and $800 million, which at the midpoint is approximately up 1% quarter-over-quarter and 7% year-over-year. This reflects continued strength in our core markets led by TME, auto, and broadcast end markets. DCG is expected to be lower after our record Q2 and WWG is expected to increase as 5G deployments and ramps continue.

Some additional color into our outlook by end-markets. Within AIT, TME sales are expected to increase meaningfully due to strong emulation and prototyping program revenues. Aerospace and Defense sales are expected to moderate from a record quarter, but should still be in line with historical levels. Industrial science and medical is expected to decline modestly as fiscal Q3 is generally a seasonally lower quarter. We continue to see general recovery in manufacturing activity in the U.S., Europe and Asia.

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ABC markets are expected to continue recovery driven by strength in auto where we are seeing increased demand from our ADAS platforms at our Tier 1 customers. Our broadcast end market is also expected to strengthen as live sports and other live events like the U.S. election coverage increase. DCG sales are expected to decline from a record quarter in Q2. As mentioned previously, the DCG business saw some order acceleration during Q2 related to trade restrictions. WWG is expected to be up modestly with a strong increase in wireless as 5G ramps continue across multiple OEMs and multiple regions offset by a decline in wired due to trade restrictions, COVID related slowdown, and seasonality. Please note, Huawei has been removed completely from our outlook across the business.

Fiscal Q3 non-GAAP gross margin is expected to be between 68.5% and 71.5%. Non-GAAP operating expense is expected to be between $333 million and $347 million. Non-GAAP other expense is expected to be between $12 million and $16 million. Non-GAAP tax rate is expected to be between 6% and 9%. In closing, we are pleased with our performance in the first half of fiscal 2021 reflecting the strength of our business across diverse end markets and continued transformation to a platform company. Our adaptive SoCs including Zynq, MPSoC, RFSoC, and our upcoming Versal line are both broadening and deepening the market and customers set for Xilinx allowing us to compete more effectively in areas traditionally served by ASSPs and ASICs. We remain as confident as ever in the opportunities ahead of us and furthering our technical and market leadership. Thank you and let me now turn the call to the operator for Q&A.

Questions and Answers:

Operator

[Operator Instructions] And your first question comes from the line of Ross Seymore from Deutsche Bank. Your line is open.

Ross Seymore — Deutsche Bank — Analyst

Hi, guys. Thanks for letting me ask a question. I just wanted to ask about some of the surprises in the quarter and what it means going forward. On one side, it looked like the AIT side didn’t grow nearly as strongly, but it looks like it’s going to rebound in the out quarter in December because of the emulation side of things. So any color on why that keeps getting pushed out? And then similarly, on the data center side, it was a great quarter by any measure in September, but your guidance for December sounds like some of that goodness was a pull-in due to the trade restrictions. So any sort of color about that would be helpful.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, Ross. Let me take that. So look on the emulation prototyping as you said, some revenue just moved over, but there is nothing fundamentally different about what we’re doing there. As I said in the prepared remarks, we really have maintained leadership with the VU19P and we’ve established that for several years now. It’s just a situation with a particular customer, I wouldn’t read anything into it beyond that.

Regarding the data center, yeah, we are saying that we saw some pull-in because of the most recent restrictions, but you can think about that really as on order of one quarter pull-in. This is not a big thing and again, I guess what I would say is that I think that it’s still an indication that we’re getting really good traction in data center. Of course, kind of, we said even without perturbations like new trade restrictions, things are generally lumpy right now in the data center as we’re still scaling the business and in general also, it’s a pretty consolidated business, so it would have some natural lumpiness and it is just causing some more perturbations on a quarter-to-quarter basis, but overall we’re still tracking to good growth and so we’re still very confident about what’s going on in data center.

Ross Seymore — Deutsche Bank — Analyst

Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Aaron Rakers from Wells Fargo. Your line is open.

Aaron Rakers — Wells Fargo — Analyst

Yeah, thanks for taking the question. Just on the topic of 5G, we saw Verizon announce this morning that I think they deployed more base stations on 5G in the last two months than they did of all of 2019. So in that context, as we see the pace of this start to accelerate, can you just revisit how you guys see the content expansion in 5G and just in general where and how we should think about the progression of that cycle and what it means for Xilinx. Thank you.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, it’s a good question, Aaron. As you said, one of the things we’re really pleased about is we’re starting to see our RFSoC being deployed in sub-6 band in North America and we also see more deployments around the world. So we’re very, very excited that we are seeing that ramp. I think just like the previous question with trade and a few other things, in particular in 5G that’s caused some pertubations, but if you step back in the big picture, right, we still are absolutely confident this is going to be a very significant opportunity for us. We have the strongest lineup we ever had. We have a Versal win for 5G, we have RFSoC deployed in areas and you’ll be hearing more about what we’re doing even with RFSoC family in terms of further derivatives and announcements. So, yeah, it’s still the first wave. You’ve heard me talk about three generations of equipment.

What’s being deployed right now is still the first wave and we certainly see that it’s good to see North America is starting to pick up, China continues and it’s had some choppiness because of various trade issues, but we are seeing other geographies starting to deploy and that is going to drive the big opportunity that we talked about, but still first innings, right. So we got engagements with the second-generation equipment, but that’s yet to deploy and then there’ll be at least another third generation, if not perhaps some after that as well.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Ambrish Srivastava from BMO. Your line is open.

Ambrish Srivastava — BMO — Analyst

Hi, thank you. Victor, I just had a follow-up on the data center side. So good to see us hit the $100 million run rate. Couple of questions from that. I just wanted to make sure I understood the upside that came largely came in the compute side and given now that it is $100 million business, could you please help us understand what are the relative sizes of the various components within that business, how big is storage versus compute versus others. Thank you.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, I would say in the last quarter it was pretty much compute led the way, followed by networking and then storage and I would say that, you know, it’s still continues to look like there is good strength in that order although between compute and SmartNIC that’s probably going to at any given time vary right because again this perkiness and just big wins and adoptions and then there is some digestion, but I would say, certainly we’re seeing a lot of strong interest in compute and again to refresh your memory on this, some of the areas in terms of the applications, we’re very strong in video, database, you could bin [Phonetic] FinTech in SmartNIC because of the low latency aspect.

You could also think of it as computing as well, but certainly in general separate apart from FinTech, I think SmartNIC in general, we’re seeing a lot of pull right. So we’re very pleased about that big win, that marquee win that I referenced, but we see continued other really good momentum and good pipeline development there. So I would say compute and network are both strong and it varies from quarter-to-quarter, which is really higher. And by the way, I don’t want to say that nothing is happening in storage. We’ve seen good wins in storage as well. It’s just that I think we’ve consistently always felt like our opportunity there is probably not quite as large as the other two and that’s sort of what we’re seeing right now.

Ambrish Srivastava — BMO — Analyst

Right, but the relative sizes are networking and storage and then compute today, right?

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

I’m sorry, say that again.

Ambrish Srivastava — BMO — Analyst

The relative sizes of the various segments. That was my other question, what — how big [Speech Overlap].

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

I think in the long run, compute is still the largest and as we said in the last quarter, compute was a very big contributor and networking next and — but I guess what I’m just saying is that at any given quarter, it could move between compute and networking and occasionally storage perhaps, but I’d say as a more what I expect integrating over time in the long run, no, compute is probably the biggest some of that will take a while to flow through, networking will be very strong and we’re seeing a lot of strength there and then storage.

Ambrish Srivastava — BMO — Analyst

Got it. Makes sense. Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Tristan Gerra from Baird. Your line is open.

Tristan Gerra — Baird — Analyst

Hi, good afternoon. Just as a follow-up, any type of revenue update that you think you could guide for data center in fiscal ’22 now that you have more visibility with your SmartNIC hyperscaler win. How should we try to quantify the data center revenue opportunity next year for Xilinx?

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Tristan, I would say that, well, we do see strength improving in multiple markets. I think we still want to take pretty much a cautious approach here because there is still uncertainty in terms of the pandemic, how the economy is going to respond, of course, you have the Presidential election. So I think I’d defer to give any guidance right now in FY ’22. Certainly, when we have our Analyst Day in December, we’ll go through all of that, but what I would — let me put it this way, though, I would say is despite a number of different things happening in this FY ’21, we do still feel like we will hit double-digit growth and over the long run, as I said in my prepared remarks, we’re confident that data center will be our greatest growing market of all the markets we serve in terms of growth rate and that we will have sustained solid double-digit growth over the next several years.

Tristan Gerra — Baird — Analyst

Okay, that’s great. And then just a quick follow-up, it looks like you’re not holding XDF this year. I wanted to understand how important XDF is in terms of building developer community around the use of FPGAs in data center. Is that something that you plan on hosting in the future. Has anything changed in terms of your vision on how to build FPGA traction and [Indecipherable] for data center or are there other means to develop that whole ecosystem?

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, I would say the XDF like for everybody that was for us a very big event and we literally would bring 1,000 or 1,000 plus and certain geography of people together altogether. So obviously, because of the pandemic, we wouldn’t be able to do that. Then we looked at thinking about doing things virtually and in the end what we decided to do is actually modify that a little bit and we have a sequence of different events called Adapt. Right, this is new to continue to essentially convey the same information, get the same kind of users and various people together in a virtual setting.

So instead of having one big, big bang kind of event, if you will, we’re spreading out over a series of virtual events that we call Adapt. So I wouldn’t say that we’ve changed our view of how important it is engage with customers, partners, users and so forth and, of course, Xilinx as well. I just think the mechanism with which we’re going to deliver this year particularly because of the pandemic and so forth, we’re changing it up a little bit, that’s all.

Tristan Gerra — Baird — Analyst

Great. Thanks again.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Blayne Curtis from Barclays. Your line is open.

Tom O’Malley — Barclays — Analyst

Hey guys, this is Tom O’Malley on for Blayne Curtis, and thanks for taking my question. I just wanted to triangulate a bit more into the data center business. There was clearly a portion in September that was pull-ins but the business has grown quite nicely from December to March to June. When you ex out the pull-ins and you look into December, you’re obviously guiding that segment lower, but should we think about that business growing off of that June base or were the pull-ins enough where you’re resetting to a lower base in December or should you see it higher than that $86 million or so that you printed in June?

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

I think when you started out talking about how looking at the run rate overall for the year, I think that’s how to really think about how we’re growing here because again the quarter-to-quarter we’ve always said typically is thirsty [Phonetic] and then you add on top of that, very short fuse kinds of government actions that’s also caused some perturbations, but the important thing to look to see is I think in this stage of where we are with that segment is the year-to-year progress and that’s why I said, even though we’re not generally providing guidance I just want to say in general, we still feel confident about even in this year growing double-digits, right.

So I think that’s the key thing. I mean, in any given quarter, we are seeing volatility some that to some extent I think it’s natural, some that are a little bit unusual and just because of the I guess what I’d say is the trade environment today. And again I think that we’re seeing lots of — the thing that we watch for too is the fact that we have lots of customer engagement, the fact that we still see our pipeline growing and that we see again the early discussion about not just on the compute side, but on the SmartNIC engagements as well as in storage and memory. So we’re pretty — we feel pretty good in terms of year-to-year progress and we’re laser focused on keeping that consistently growing double-digit.

Tom O’Malley — Barclays — Analyst

Great and if you could sneak me in for a follow-up. I just wanted to isolate the medical business. Clearly, there’s probably some increased revenue due to what’s going on in the world right now. And you guided aerospace and defense for a record quarter. Can you talk about what percentage of your business is medical? I know that on prior calls, you indicated that, that percentage was maybe increasing a bit. Can you talk about what you expect for that business given maybe some pull-ins given the state of the world?

Brice Hill — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

This is Brice. We don’t break out exactly what is medical, but we have seen accelerations in the area for the COVID environment and we do think it’s a driver for our business going forward long-term. We had an announcement this quarter about an MPSoC product that will be deployed for AI X-ray capability with one of our customers and we think that’s a good example of Victor’s strategy of the adaptable SoC’s at the edge bringing more capability in the environment and helping Xilinx address more workloads. So you’re right, it’s a good driver for us and it’s those types of applications at the edge that will be a driver for that particular end market.

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Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

And by the way, I would also add that aside from direct medical equipment which were designed into a lot of places, we also are seeing medical applications in modeling and simulation in the cloud, right. So we talked about a number of ISVs that are focused on medical and they’re doing cloud acceleration. So we see that also within the DCG business if you will.

Tom O’Malley — Barclays — Analyst

Great. Thanks.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of William Stein from Truist Securities. Your line is open.

William Stein — Truist Securities — Analyst

Hey, thanks for taking my question. Two questions about data center. First, Victor, earlier you talked about double-digit growth in this market and one of the things that I’m trying to pay attention to is what you said at Analyst Days and the last one I think the company presented this 36% [Indecipherable]. I’m wondering if that’s still a realistic expectation. It seems like your beating it in some quarters, not in others. Is the long-term view still that you can hit that 36% growth number or perhaps better or worse?

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, I mean I think I would say that we don’t think things have changed that much other than yeah 2020 was a challenging year for a variety of things. So there’ll be some impacts of that, but I’d say overall, we’re still in that ballpark of growth, right. And again, we’ll talk about that at Analyst Day, but we still feel very confident and we do really think that this is a long haul kind of strategy, right. We’re not as focused on what happens quarter-to-quarter, we want to make sure that we’re progressing year-on-year and not just on revenue, but again, the pipeline, our ecosystem development, the Alveo boards business which again I want to bring everybody back to.

We had no business there two years ago and we’re tracking to that being a good portion of our revenue for FY ’21 and so I think that new revenue stream, which is new, we have to stand up an entire different distribution channel and VARs and distributors and system integrators and we’ve done that now and I think, yeah, I think we are — overall, I would say you’re not going to hear big changes, but stay tuned for the Analyst Day in terms of more granularity on that.

William Stein — Truist Securities — Analyst

That’s helpful. If I can have one follow-up. You’ve spoken a bit today and in the past about SmartNICs and I think that’s a very good business for you. There is a competitor that’s highlighting this product they call a DPU, although I’d say they’re not the only one. There’s at least two other companies that have highlighted similar products. I’m wondering if as Xilinx sees it, is this a marketing distinction or is this a more meaningful different product and if it’s more — if the difference is more meaningful, would Xilinx potentially have a play in that market?

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yeah, let me first sort of say what I think is a good validation which is that more and more people are saying the SmartNIC, they have to do a lot more customization in the data path and you know they can’t get away with just mainly a fixed function with a little bit of flexibility that the customers are demanding the ability to do more specialization for their unique needs, whether that’s for security or just how to optimize and tune, right, the overall economics of their data center, right. And so, I’d say that’s a good trend and people are now taking different approaches. That particular architecture is using a large array of fairly typical embedded processors cores if you will, which really isn’t the most effective efficient way to do that. We approach it obviously with a really very, very flexible and adaptive infrastructure that we have on our products.

And we still have ARM SoCs. So from a software program portion of it, that’s pretty typical, but how we actually do the acceleration and how we allow people to customize in the data path is, I think, much more powerful to deliver high-performance as well as low latency and really, again, customized to exactly what they need. Plus, I mean, you could make very significant changes on the same piece of silicon after things are fabricated. So just in terms of being able to make new features, capabilities or fixed new software holes — I mean, orry, security holes afterwards, it would provide the most future proofing, if you will.

So I think we have that strong capability. I think I would also add one final thing is that our software and systems knowledge was significantly increased when we completed the Solarflare acquisition. So not only do we have this really uniquely powerful hardware, adaptable hardware, but now we also have really good experts in terms of production and quality drivers and overall system expertise. So I think that certainly served us well in competing against all the top players, including the one that you mentioned.

William Stein — Truist Securities — Analyst

Thanks, Victor.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Christopher Rolland from SIG. Your line is open.

Christopher Rolland — SIG — Analyst

Thanks for the questions guys and solid quarter. My questions are around WWG and even in the late stages of 4G, you guys were doing more than $200 million a quarter likely in WWG and I know we’re on the early side here, but I thought we were expecting a content bump and then also historically, FPGA has been on the early side of the deployment. So I guess why aren’t we seeing more versus our expectations some ways back? And then also perhaps you had a competitor, Qualcomm that sounds like it’s getting into the macro business as well. Do you have any views on their parts and whether they are a competitive threat for you guys in WWG? Thanks.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, so let me address a number of those points there. So maybe on the — we typically enable people to get there really quickly. I think we did see that, right? I mean, I think what happened with Samsung in deploying in South Korea ahead of all geographies frankly, even ahead of China, which I think everybody largely expected would go first and we were there, right? And we’re there. In fact, we were there in such a big way, we were totally candid in saying that we don’t expect to hold on to some of that because we enabled exactly what you said, getting to market very rapidly and then over time, in the area in terms of the baseband where we’re traditionally not quite as strong, we got displaced, but we continue to grow where we have been traditionally been strong and in fact, we have a strong hand in the radio. And again, it’s going to be more radios, more different configurations with massive MIMO many different bands and so on.

So I think we still absolutely believe that we will beat the 4G kind of run rate, but again, things are kind of in the early stages. I guess the other thing is, I don’t want to keep getting back to the trade thing, but it is quite significant that at this point one of our top customers in communications is zero, right? So I just want to say that, that is a headwind that doesn’t just disappear overnight. In fact, I would say, considering we’re holding, losing one of our top customers in any segment, but in communications and especially 5G wireless, that is a significant challenge, but despite that, we still see that we’re going to exceed that. And what wasn’t around in the 4G, again, not only because there’s so much more complexity and challenges in 5G, but the whole advent that we talked about O-RAN, I think that’s a really potentially very big opportunity for us and we’re the ideal solution for that. So stay tuned. It’s still — I know it’s — everybody is looking for the quick inflection, but this is a long journey here and I think that we’re still in very good shape.

Christopher Rolland — SIG — Analyst

Yes, I think those are fair points. Did you have anything to say on the Qualcomm announcement and [Speech Overlap].

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Oh, I’m sorry, yes, look, that just broke now and look, I’m not going to pretend to be fully up to speed on that. I guess it doesn’t surprise me again because 5G is such a big opportunity and it’s just showing folks who have adjacencies are now wanting to move in. And look, I look at it as more competition, keeps you on your game, right? And that’s why I feel like we’re in a very strong position because we certainly upped our game with integrating things like analog capability and RFSoC, what we’ve done with Versal, and you’ll hear more announcements soon about other technologies that we’re bringing to bear in that market.

Christopher Rolland — SIG — Analyst

Thanks, again, Victor.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

You’re welcome. Thank you.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of C.J. Muse from Evercore ISI. Your line is open.

Kevin Feeney — Evercore ISI — Analyst

Hello, this is Kevin Feeney on for C.J. So just want to talk about wireless and I was just kind of curious on what are a couple of, I guess, the critical inflections you see over the next couple of years lke is that 5G and C-Band coming out or some of the other things you see ramping up? And then I guess, can you talk a bit more about design win activity you’ve seen maybe in second-generation equipment versus what you were seeing in first-gen equipment?

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes, I think in terms of the second generation, and again, people are in different stages. Some people are still fairly early, others are pretty far along. I think one of the things that we think that just from a timing perspective, right, Versal was really not going to be in time for the first wave, but Versal is there for the second and again, the public, the one that’s publicly announced is the work we’re doing with Samsung and we feel very good about that. Again, we have more coming down the pipe in terms of the RFSoC family. So, that’s been really successful and we’ve seen that deployed.

I think we’ve talked about how a lot of the regions have not really deployed very significantly and so I do think the fact that North America is starting to do their deployments and drive is a good sign. I think we’ve consistently felt that most of the action is going to be in sub-6, but millimeter wave will be there and our SoC is being deployed in some millimeter wave systems as well. So, yes, I think it’s still pretty early because we haven’t seen those second-generation equipment being deployed, but we’re going to be in a lot of those systems, both with Versal and RFSoC and again, stay tuned for that.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Matt Ramsay from Cowen. Your line is open.

Matt Ramsay — Cowen — Analyst

Thank you very much. Good afternoon. Victor, a lot have been focused on the call here on WWG and the data center businesses where there’s potential inflections and you guys are battling it out for design wins and that all makes sense. I wanted to actually focus on the primary AIT and ABC businesses. I think yourselves and your customer base have probably had some time to digest and another hiccup in the silicon road map at your primary competitor and you guys have done some great work on those businesses with consistent road maps for a while. So, I just wonder if you could update us on sort of the broad-based design win environment that you’re seeing versus Intel, Altera and what that might mean for the next several years?

And then just a quick one for Brice. I noticed it was a 14-week quarter in the guidance and that’s probably a holiday quarter, but if that’s significant or not, that would be helpful. Thank you.

Brice Hill — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Yes, Matt, this is Brice. Thanks for the question. I’ll start and then Victor I think will add a couple of points on. First, on the 14-week, we do think it will be relatively small. Those are holiday days, but we do have approximately $10 million in our forecast for that 14th week. So that’s about the size of it. When we think about the core markets that you talked about, really, I think the first thing I’d say is our strategy for the adaptable SoCs, you could really see in some of the announcements during the quarter of getting designs in various end markets that are going to help propel the business faster than just the traditional FPGA market, but also gaining new sockets. Examples were in automotive where we had two announcements on MPSoCs for automated driving systems and 4D radar. I mentioned the example of the healthcare AI X-ray design win that we had.

So we look across those end markets and we see that in the short-term automotive and broadcast are going to grow quickly as the economy recovers, but there’s also drivers as those devices get put in play in the edge and in autos and we think that will be significant for the company. And then on the larger section of end markets, Aerospace and Defense, Victor mentioned the radiation tolerant device that we got an award for. We also think that radar innovation will help drive utilization for our devices going forward.

And then when we think about industrial, the recovery is strong in industrial. We think that’s tracking the economy. And again, we’re just focused on the edge opportunities we have for machine learning and AI and high performance, low power device operations, which is where our products specialize. And then finally, we talked about Test, Measurement and Emulation and that’s a big business for us and we expect to have a strong quarter going forward and we talked about our 35 billion transistor device that we have for that market that is optimized and we think that, that market grows over time with product complexity. So really good drivers across all those businesses and we’re confident that we’ll have growth in the coming years that will be beyond what’s normal for the traditional FPGA market.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

The only thing I’ll add with regard to that competitive angle that you asked about is that, yes, we continue to and we’re confident we’ll continue to get our share relative to them overall. In fact, I think we’ve said it before in many instances now, we don’t — if they do compete they’re not necessarily in the short list of I’d say, the most challenging competitors when we get down to design wins. Very often, it’s really some other kind of products or certainly from a vendor perspective. I’d like to feel that most of that is really attributed to the fact that we’re innovating and executing so well, as you said, the fact that they may have some other challenges in addition to that. Yes, that could have some effect, but I think, by and large, we’re making our own opportunity there and we think that will continue.

Also Read:  LendingTree Inc (TREE) Q3 2020 Earnings Call Transcript

Matt Ramsay — Cowen — Analyst

Thanks. Really appreciate the color there guys.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Michelle Waller from Needham & Company. Your line is open.

Michelle Waller — Needham & Company — Analyst

Hi, guys. Thanks for taking the question. I’m on for Quinn. So just one quick one for me. It seems like Nvidia has been gaining strong momentum in inferencing based on some of their recent benchmark results. Just wondering if you guys can update us on your progress in inferencing and how that opportunity is shaping for you? And actually — and then a quick one for Brice, just on the tax rate beyond the December quarter. It looks like it’s been fluctuating over the past few quarters and just kind of wondering what we should assume beyond the December quarter?

Brice Hill — Executive Vice President and Chief Financial Officer

Okay. I’ll tackle the tax rate first, and then Victor will comment on the other. So for the tax rate, yes, you probably noticed in Q2, we had an ultra-low tax rate, 1% on the non-GAAP and what really happened in Q2 is our share-based awards vest and if they’ve appreciated, we get a tax benefit for that. So that’s what’s driving the lower tax rate for the quarter. When we look forward, you see a more normal rate. So, Michelle, the Q3 guide is probably more normal and then when we think about longer term, we’ll probably increase 1 point or 2 points over time as our Singapore rate goes from 0% to 5%. So, hopefully, that answers the question.

Michelle Waller — Needham & Company — Analyst

Yes. Thanks.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yes and then, in terms of inference. First of all, I want to make sure everybody really does understand that inference goes well beyond the data center, right? So, for instance, all those applications you kind of referred to, recent ones in automotive wins, were in wins in other kinds of edge applications that I don’t mean just edge computing, but just edge devices as well as endpoint devices. So we’re doing very well I think in the broader inference. Within data center, I think we’ve always said is that most applications are not completely dominated by the AI portion, the neuro network processing and we’re able to accelerate other portions of the application. That’s why we kind of coined the phrase whole application acceleration, right?

And so I think the areas where we tend to shine is where we’re actually accelerating other parts of the application as well as including AI. And yes, we continue to be focused on inference. We’re not really driving towards training. So the competitor you mentioned what they’re doing, that’s fairly new. We’ll sort of see how that plays out, but again, I think that we’re accelerating not only AI inference in the cloud, but also just applications that don’t necessarily have AI at all and I think that’s what to think about it is that we are not building hardware that has to be dedicated to only do one thing. Again, we have this great dynamic range, if you will, of all these things that we can accelerate and support and enable people to really differentiate.

Michelle Waller — Needham & Company — Analyst

Okay. Thanks. That’s helpful.

Operator

Your next question comes from the line of Srini Pajjuri from SMBC. Your line is open.

Srini Pajjuri — SMBC — Analyst

Thank you. Hi, guys. A couple of questions, Victor. First on the SmartNIC market. It looks like a lot of you guys are talking about [Indecipherable] and Marvell and NVIDIA, etc, it looks like there’s an inflection in the market itself. I know SmartNICs have been around for a while. I’m just curious as to what’s driving that inflection? And then I think you did mention about $100 million potential from one of the design wins. If you could give us some idea how big that business is for you and when do you see that hitting that $100 million run rate? And then I have a follow-up.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Okay, yes, look I think the reason why there’s so much momentum towards SmartNIC is, one is data centers are a means to upgrade just the bandwidth that they have, but I think the clear recognition that having driver code to support more networking is really causing the economics of the data center to be somewhat bottlenecked by that. So by offloading, running that code, which you don’t get paid for right, you don’t get to monetize those codes by doing that. If you could ship that off to a SmartNIC rather than just a dumb NIC, then that’s a big win in and of itself, but then there’s — it goes beyond that because there’s lots of things that people want to do in terms of security. And then indeed, you could actually do computation, right, while data is in motion, right? And I think this is all part of the bigger picture that the data center architecture is being disrupted, right?

I think many people really — people smarter than I in this have coined the phrase that the entire data center is really the computer, that people want to compose resources of how many CPU cores they need, the amount of network bandwidth and service level that they need there and then storage and there’s really going to be computing distributed throughout all of that and we play in all those areas, right, with one scalable architecture and that is unique. Other people have to do that with multiple different types of architectures and devices. So the SmartNIC is just one part of that whole I guess what I would say is disruption and revolution in the data center architecture. And again, the flexibility, the ability to customize exactly what people need and also to change things that are pretty significant way after they’ve been deployed, I think those are the unique value that we enable our customers with.

So in terms of the $100 million that we talked about, I think we referenced that we see that run rate hitting in the FY ’24 time frame. Obviously, the revenue will start somewhat before that, but it will be a fairly quick ramp. And that is just to be clear, one customer. We’ve got multiple that we’ve already won and we’ve seen business from, but obviously, there’s different things in the pipeline that we haven’t yet converted to wins and revenue, but yes, a lot of good activity in SmartNIC.

Srini Pajjuri — SMBC — Analyst

Got it. And then more of a strategic question, Victor. Given all the M&A that we are seeing, in particular, NVIDIA looking to acquire ARM. It looks like, certainly, there is a case to be made for having both the accelerator and the CPU together or at least as part of the same package or module. You guys have been — have done extremely well on the acceleration side and you also have ARM SoC capability, which you’ve been investing in the last few years.

So my question is, does it make sense or why wouldn’t it make sense for you guys to be a bit more aggressive on the CPU front, even kind of targeting things like ARM server market, because that seems to be finally taken — I mean, I don’t want to use word the word taken off, but at least there seems to be a lot of interest in that market and you already have the expertise in house. And I’m just curious, given the large TAM opportunity out there, why wouldn’t it make sense for you guys to target the market?

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

So first I would say is that this group has been very disciplined and respectful about what Matt said at the top of us not commenting or answering any questions regarding the rumors. So, since you’re asking me about how I think about CPU market, I’ll focus it that way as opposed to any other noise around M&A.

I believe that Xilinx has got this unique technology and capability. We invented the FPGA and this whole notion of a silicon architecture that after manufacturing, you can modify it to a very large extent through software and that being a very scalable architecture and over time, adding more and more capability to that, to the extent, as you point out, a number of years ago, now we’ve had multi-core ARM SoCs in there. So we do have SoC capability. My own background as I was back when I was doing real engineering, a microprocessor designer. So we certainly have many other people with that expertise, but we really feel like we want to stick to the core strength of this company, right, and the core strength of the company is us understanding how to create that hardware architectures that are very capable including this adaptability, this flexibility, together with the software that you need to sort of make that happen, right?

And I think it serves us well to stay to our really core strength, but we do have expertise in those areas, but I think from a strategy perspective, that is not something we’re thinking about is going out to server class kinds of CPUs. I think we have a lot of capability in SoCs and we’ll exercise that, but really, it’s the combination of all those elements, right, the SoC, together with the adaptable engines together with now our AI engine, a multi-core tiled kind of many people consider the spatial processor. I mean, I think we have pretty much all the skill sets of the future, which is heterogeneous computing, high-performance heterogeneous computing and that’s what we’ll focus on, right? That view of the world as opposed to say, hey, I’m going [Phonetic] to take on companies that have historically been all about CPUs and computing. So —

Srini Pajjuri — SMBC — Analyst

Got it. Thanks, Victor.

Operator

And your final question comes from the line of Chris Caso from Raymond James. Your line is open.

Chris Caso — Raymond James — Analyst

Yes, thank you. Question is on O-RAN. And if you could expand upon some of the comments there about where you expect to play on that? And I guess specifically, where would you expect content to go on Xilinx — content to go in the O-RAN architecture? And what’s the value proposition for Xilinx against competing solutions? Where you guys win on that architecture?

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Well, I think with what we’ve done with our RFSoC and then future things that we’re doing again, you can think of it in one sense is it’s consistent with our story of how we’re transforming to more of a platform company as opposed to a component or device company. And I think, as I’ve said, not only is RFSoC a unique silicon architecture, but we have our own IP and we’ve worked with customers in terms of — we talked about [Indecipherable] but there’s other functions primarily on the radio side and some of the other things in digital front end that we’ve really gotten a lot stronger on terms of just our own state of [Technical Issues]. Now, for O-RAN, we’re still partnering too. So, I’m not professing to say that we have all the elements and from a software perspective, we’re partnering both with AltioStar as well as Mavenir and we’ve worked with other players as well. So, I think that a lot of it is not just the silicon, but we’ve come a long ways in terms of understanding the system solution, right? And again, you’ll hear more about that.

And I think in O-RAN, in particular, because O-RAN is going to have to be — when that’s deployed, it has to interoperate with a lot of different things and these deployments are unique and all these different carriers have unique things and I think this flexibility that we just talked about that permeates all of our products is going to be very important in the O-RAN situation, right, to be able to not have to do custom silicon for all those things that have one base of hardware, a platform that you could then customize for all those different deployments and different configurations. So, that’s why I think we think we’re really well suited for O-RAN and we have both some of the knowledge and we’ll partner with others as well.

Chris Caso — Raymond James — Analyst

Thanks.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Yep.

Operator

And we have reached the allotted time for questions. Mr. Victor Peng, I turn the call back over to you for some closing remarks.

Victor Peng — President and Chief Executive Officer

Thank you. So, look, I just want to say in closing, I’m extremely proud of my team’s excellent execution delivering these very solid Q2 results despite COVID-19 challenges given the most recent trade restrictions. We’re making great progress on our data center customer wins and engagements as you’ve heard, we’re seeing good adoption of Alveo, and we continue to grow our software and ISE as well as the broader ecosystem. And we’ve had a lot of discussion on — while in the near-term, quarter-to-quarter, revenue is still lumpy, we’re very confident in our data center strategy and we’re very confident about being able to sustain double-digit growth over the long run.

We expect WWG business to resume growth. Again, as RFSoC volume continues to ramp and then once Versal also begins production deployment, and of course, as 5G, in general becomes more broadly deployed around the world in all the different geographies. While O-RAN is still in its early days, it’s gaining momentum and we believe this is a very big opportunity for us in the future. Lastly, our core business is showing strength in several markets, including very encouraging sign for recovery in the automotive business, which was impacted a little bit more than others. So we’re extremely focused on our platform transformation, growing our ecosystem and deploying a very robust and complete software development environment.

We’re also enhancing our capabilities to deliver customized solutions for our customers to meet their needs in the most optimal way, balancing performance, power costs, again, enabling very fast time to market and also a degree of future proofing. So while 2020 has been — presented several challenges, we remain confident in our strategy and sustained solid growth over the long run. So thank you for joining us this afternoon on the call. And I’ll turn it back to Matt for a few housekeeping comments.

Matt Poirier — Senior Vice President of Corporate and Business Development and Investor Relations

Great. Thanks, Victor and thanks everyone for joining us today. We’ll have a playback of this call beginning at 7:00 PM Pacific, 10:00 PM Eastern later today. For a copy of our earnings release, please visit our Investor Relations website. Our next earnings release date for the third quarter of fiscal year 2021 will be on Wednesday, 25th of January, after the market close. This completes our call and thank you very much for your participation.

Operator

[Operator Closing Remarks]

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